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How to Select a Naturopathic Doctor

I believe that women need the medicine that Naturopathic Doctors offer.  I believe that giving women the knowledge they need to make healthy decisions for their health, and the health of their families, is one of the most powerful ways we can empower women. This is the entire reason my website exists – to share knowledge and empower women.

But I can’t be everywhere.  And I can’t treat everyone.  As a Naturopathic Doctor I am a regulated health care professional and can only practice in jurisdictions where I am licensed (Ontario, Canada).  Every week I receive emails from people across Canada and around the world who want to find someone like me.  The great news is that there are many wonderful Naturopathic Doctors out there who are making huge impacts on the health of their community.  And you can find one in your area.

How to Select a Naturopathic Doctor

The Basics

1. Do they have a degree in Naturopathic Medicine?

In North America there are only seven accredited schools where a Naturopathic Doctor can obtain a degree.  Only two of these are in Canada.  You can check the schools on the website for the Council for Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME).

2. Are they licensed to practice in the province or state where you live?

Naturopathic Medicine is not regulated the same in every province or state.  In fact, only 5 provinces (Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba) currently regulate Naturopathic Doctors.  Many states in the USA also regulate Naturopathic Medicine, while others are still seeking regulation.  (Click here to check if your state is regulated).

Regulation is important to ensure the safety of the public – if you are in a regulated area only see a Naturopathic Doctor who is licensed to practice in that area.  If you are not, consider finding a Naturopathic Doctor who is licensed to practice in a regulated area.

The Right Fit

3. Do they have a practice focus? 

Naturopathic Doctors are primary care physicians – trained to support a wide variety of health care conditions and concerns.  However, many Naturopaths choose to focus their practice on treating a specific concern or population.  Ask your potential ND if they have a practice focus and see if it is inline with the concerns you are seeking care for.  You don’t want to see a cancer-focused Naturopathic Doctor if you are seeking care for PCOS.

4. Do they have any additional certifications or training?

The education of Naturopathic Doctors should not end when they graduate from naturopathic medical school.  There are additional certifications and associations that Naturopathic Doctors can obtain that can enhance the services they offer.  Examples include bio-identical hormone prescribing, IV micronutrient therapy, perinatal, cancer, or pediatric associations.

The Best Practices

5. What types of assessments or testing do they offer in their practice?

One of the core tenets of Naturopathic Medicine is to treat the root cause.  How is your Naturopathic Doctor going to help to uncover the root cause of your symptoms?  Do they offer the highest level of functional tests in addition to standard blood tests? Do they do mostly energetic testing?  Will they review lab tests from your Medical Doctor? How do they decide what tests may be necessary for you?

6. Do they incorporate evidence based information and research into their treatment plans? 

The body of research on naturopathic medicine is growing every single day.  How does your Naturopathic Doctor stay up to date on research in their practice?  Do they incorporate both modern research and traditional knowledge into their treatment plans?  Patients are often surprised by the amount of research we can provide on the treatments we are suggesting for their care!

7. Will they work integratively together with your current health care team?

Integrative Medicine is choosing the best of all forms of medicine with the sole purpose of improving patient outcomes.  ~ Dr. Lisa

I think the medicine of the future will be more patient-centered, with all different types of health care providers working together to improve the health of individuals and their families.  I love working with Medical Doctors, physiotherapists, psychotherapists, nurse practitioners, chiropractors, osteopaths, massage therapists, and many other health professionals.  I truly believe this approach benefits everyone, most importantly my patients.

8. What types of therapies do they use in their practice?

Naturopathic Doctors are trained in a number of different therapies, from acupuncture to herbal medicine, nutritional supplementation and homeopathy.  What therapies does your Naturopath use, and why?  Personally I don’t use a lot of homeopathy in my practice because there isn’t a vast body of research supporting its use.  I focus on the research based treatments of nutritional and botanical medicines.  Discuss what your Naturopath is using and see if it resonates with what you’re looking for.

9. How much experience does the Naturopathic Doctor have?

There are many more important considerations than the number of years a doctor has been in practice, but it is something to discuss when meeting a Naturopath for the first time.  You don’t necessarily want to be someone’s first patient with your health concern.

10. Do you trust them, feel listened to, and comfortable with them?

In my mind, this is one of the most important considerations.  Ideally you are building a long term relationship with your Naturopathic Doctor.  Consider the so-called “soft traits” like personality, approachability, empathy and trust when deciding on your Naturopath.  This can be the make or break factor in selecting your ND, and I encourage you to trust your gut.

To make things easy for you, I’ve made a pdf with all these suggestions.  Bring it along when meeting your Naturopathic Doctor for the first time.  Most NDs offer a free 10-15 minute meet and greet appointment – I highly recommend taking them up on this.  Take the time to choose the best ND for you, and you will benefit immensely from the investment!

How to Select an ND

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

 

Sasquatches and Hair Loss: Supernatural Health Series

As a doctor in Canada I try to be very sensitive to the health concerns of my fellow Canadians.  Issues like high rates of autoimmune disease and multiple sclerosis, vitamin D deficiencies in the vast majority of individuals, and soaring rates of diabetes and heart disease are those I address in my practice every day.  And as a Canadian I also care about our supernatural community, most notably the Sasquatch.

Sasquatches (sometimes known as “Bigfoot” based on the most commonly found evidence of their existence), are native to the Pacific coast of North America, mostly through the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, Oregon and Washington state.  Population counts vary as the Sasquatch are notoriously a secretive race.

Hair Loss in Sasquatches

One condition that is known to be distressing to Sasquatches is hair loss.  As Sasquatches do not use clothing they rely on their full body hair for warmth during the long northern winters.

Hair loss can have many different causes in both humans and Sasquatches.  I have highlighted a few of the most common below:

  1. Aging – hair loss is a normal process of aging. By 40 years of age, human hair growth slows, and it may be the same for the Sasquatch.  New hairs are not replaced as quickly as old ones are lost.  This will impact both male and female Sasquatches, however males may have more prominent hair loss due to the impacts of testosterone.
  2. Hormones – hormones, like testosterone and other androgens (“male hormones”) can contribute to hair loss in men, women and Sasquatches. The hair loss patterns in androgen associated hair loss are often easy to identify.  If you see a male Sasquatch with a receding hairline, or with loss from the top of their head, they should consider having their hormone levels tested.  If you see a female Sasquatch with all over hair thinning or with more hair on her chin or upper lip, suggest she have her hormone levels looked at.
  3. Low thyroid function – with up to 1 in 5 human adults experiencing low thyroid function it may be possible that rates are equally high in Sasquatches. Low thyroid function can lead to diffuse, all over hair loss, or in some cases patches of total hair loss (alopecia areata.)
  4. Celiac disease – another condition often associated with alopecia areata, celiac disease occurs when consumption of gluten (wheat, barley, rye) damages the small intestines and causes systemic symptoms by creating antibodies that attack various cells in the body, including hair follicles. The only treatment for the Sasquatch with celiac disease is total avoidance of gluten containing grains – which is not typically a staple in the Sasquatch diet.
  5. Nutritional deficiencies – depending on the diet of the Sasquatch, they may be prone to nutrient deficiencies that are contributing to hair loss. Just about any nutrient deficiency can lead to hair loss but some of the most common include iron, vitamin A, zinc and essential fatty acids.

Help for Hair Loss in Sasquatches

Just as with my human patients, I encourage any supernatural being, Sasquatch or other, to seek comprehensive testing when they experience hair loss.  Many doctors do not adequately assess for the many different conditions that can lead to hair loss, leaving people (and Sasquatches) frustrated and feeling like there are no answers.  But most cases of hair loss have an identifiable root cause, and once that is addressed even the most hopeless Sasquatch can regain hope, and potentially a full body of healthy hair.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes by the supernatural community. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed monster doctor. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Frankenstein, or other primary care provider is recommended for any supernatural being suffering from a health problem.

Zombies, BRAINS and Essential Fatty Acids

Theories abound on how zombies came to exist.  Contaminated food supply, mutated viruses, radiation exposure or parasitic infection.  No matter the cause of the zombie state, one thing is consistent for all zombies – a need for BRAINS.

Why Brains?

As we don’t have any zombies to consult for this article, we must rely on a bit of speculation as to why zombies have a nutritional preference for brains.  The human brain is the fattiest organ in the body, made up of at least 60% fat.  However if the fat was the only nutrient a zombie was interested in, adipose tissue (body fat) might be an easier target, especially in North America where roughly 70% of the population is overweight or obese.

What brain tissue has that body fat does not is a high concentration of a specific omega 3 fatty acid, DHA (docosahexaenoic acid).  Concentrations of this essential fatty acid are higher in the brain than any other tissue.  Could it be that zombies are hungering for more DHA?

Functions of DHA in the Brain

DHA is essential for the development of the brain and nervous system in infants, and in the repair and protection of the brain in aging individuals.  Perhaps zombies are seeking the known benefits of DHA on cognitive function (as their function has been significantly decreased by the zombie state).  Some of the known benefits include:

  • Improved memory
  • Improved learning
  • Improved mood
  • Improved neuroplasticity
  • Decreased rates of dementia
  • Decreased rates of depression
  • Increased brain size (less loss of brain size with age)

Novel Nutritional Recommendations for Zombies

I’d like to encourage all zombies, and zombie caregivers, to consider other sources of DHA and to leave the brains where they are best put to use – in the heads of healthy humans.  While food sources of DHA are not abundant in the typical zombie diet, incorporating more of these foods may help to reduce brain cravings and support zombie health.

Food Sources of DHA

  • Algae
  • Fatty fish – especially cold water fish like anchovies, salmon, mackerel, and herring
  • Eggs – especially DHA enriched eggs
  • DHA supplements

Select References

Dyall SC, Long-chain omega-3 fatty acids and the brain: a review of the independent and share effects of EPA, DPA and DHA.  Front Aging Neurosci 2015;7:52 https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4404917/

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes by the supernatural community. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed monster doctor. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Frankenstein, or other primary care provider is recommended for any supernatural being suffering from a health problem.

Mummies & Dehydration: Supernatural Health Series

Water, water everywhere.  With 71% of the earth being covered in water, and around 60% of the human body being water, there is no doubt that water is one of the most important elements of health – health of the body and health of our environment.

But what about the health of mummies?  No one is more prone to severe dehydration that a mummified person or animal.  In fact, a lack of water is necessary for the mummification process.

So what is a health seeking mummy to do?  Let’s look at general guidelines for water consumption in humans, and see if our mummy brethren can benefit from this information.

Benefits of Water

Every system in our body uses water.  Without water many essential processes slow down or do not function optimally.  Some of the most important functions of water in the body:

  • carrying nutrients to your cells
  • allowing your cells to remove debris
  • flushing bacteria out of the bladder
  • supporting digestion
  • regulating bowel movements
  • supporting blood pressure
  • protecting joints
  • regulating body temperature
  • maintaining salt balance in the body

Signs of Dehydration

Dehydration can occur quickly, especially on hot days, or slowly with compounded effects day after day.  If you have any of the following signs of dehydration, you should increase your water intake and talk to your doctor.

  • headaches
  • dizziness
  • weakness
  • low blood pressure
  • confusion
  • dark coloured urine
  • dry skin
  • bandage wrapped skin and a birth date more than 100 years ago

How Much Water to Drink?

There is no hard rule for how much water to drink, but there are some general guidelines which can be helpful in keeping you hydrated.

  1. Two to three cups (250ml) per hour – This will keep you hydrated all day long
  2. 8×8 rule – eight 8oz glasses per day. – Simple, easy to remember, but not based on any hard science, the 8×8 rule is likely to work for most people
  3. 5-1.0 ounces per pound of body weight – A nice guideline that can be easily individualized based on your weight. Aim for the higher amount during hotter or drier weather.

For mummies, the recommended amount of water is likely to be much higher due to a baseline of severe dehydration.  I recommend tripling the above recommendations to meet a mummy’s water needs.

Human, or mummy, water is essential to our quality of life.  So pick a guideline above and challenge yourself to drink your way to optimal health.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes by the supernatural community. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed monster doctor. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Frankenstein, or other primary care provider is recommended for any supernatural being suffering from a health problem.

Laryngitis in Mermaids: Top Five Tips

There is no more famous case of laryngitis than that of the Little Mermaid. While her voice was lost due to an unfortunate deal with an evil sea witch, mermaids must be mindful of maintaining their voices lest they lose the ability to lure unsuspecting sailors to their destiny in the sea.

This article gives my top five tips for treating and preventing laryngitis in mermaids, mermen and sirens. Don’t let your lost voice be the loss of your allure.

  1. Increase Vitamin C

Vitamin C can help merfolk boost their immune system and overcome the inflammation of laryngitis. Sea vegetables, like dulse or kelp, contain about 20mg of vitamin C per tablespoon. So up your seaweed intake, or consider getting a vitamin C supplement – it is a water soluble supplement so watch that it doesn’t dissolve in the sea.

  1. Sage Tea

Sage (Salvia officinalis) is a land plant that is most often associated with Thanksgiving turkey dinners. However, it can be used by humans and mermaids alike to calm a sore throat and heal laryngitis. Sage has astringent, antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make it ideal for laryngitis.

Sage is most commonly used as a tea – brew 1-2 tsp in boiling water and drink warm (2-3 cups per day). You can also add honey if available in your neck of the sea. Don’t use sage if you are breastfeeding merbabies, as it can reduce milk supply.

  1. Licorice Reduction

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) is the root from another land plant and has anti-inflammatory and soothing properties. My favourite way of using licorice is as a reduction. Simple to prepare, and delicious, licorice reduction is safe for meradults and merchildren.

To make the reduction boil 8 tbsp of licorice root in 6 cups of water. Reduce heat and simmer until the mixture reduces to 1 ½ cups. Remove from heat and add 6 tbsp of honey. Cool, bottle and keep in a cool wet sack. Merchildren can have 1 tsp three times per day, and meradults can have 1 tbsp three times daily.

  1. Total Voice Rest

While the temptation for mermaids may be to sing, total voice rest is recommended for any merfolk suffering with laryngitis. Even whispering can prolong the inflammation in the laryngx and slow healing. So give your voice a rest for a few days and trust to your body language to get your message across.

  1. Don’t Trust Sea Witches

My final suggestion for preventing laryngitis is to avoid sea witches, and never trust one if you do encounter one. Sea witches are one of the most common causes of laryngitis in mermaids (although a rare cause in humans). Remember – an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure – so leave the sea witches to their own devices and reduce your risk of developing laryngitis.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes by the supernatural community. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed monster doctor. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Frankenstein, or other primary care provider is recommended for any supernatural being suffering from a health problem.

 

Vampires and Vitamin D Deficiency

Very little is known about the health issues impacting our supernatural community. Notoriously secretive, no agency (that we are aware of) is maintaining statistics on the health of supernatural beings. In this series I will be bringing a greater awareness to this issue, discussing some of the most common concerns impacting the magical members of our global community. Perhaps through education we may bring some light to those inhabiting our darkest nights.

No Sunshine in Their Lives

The existence of vampires has been documented in cultures around the world since ancient times. While exact population counts are impossible to attain, vampires are thought to be one of the most populous of all the supernatural beings.

Dwelling only in the darkness, vampires at are significant risk of vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D is produced when the sun’s ultraviolet rays (UVB rays) penetrate the skin. With full body exposure to sunlight, a body can produce upwards of 10 000 to 20 000IU of vitamin D after just 15 minutes. This duration of sun exposure would certainly be fatal to a vampire.

40% of Humans, 100% of Vampires

It is estimated that 40% of humans are deficient in vitamin D, with rates being much higher during the winter months when UVB rays are unable to the Northern hemisphere. With no exposure to the sun it may be estimated that 100% of vampires are likely to be deficient in vitamin D.

Risks of Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D deficiency can lead to an increased incidence of colds and influenza, osteoporosis, autoimmune disease, and over 16 different types of cancer, including breast, pancreatic and lung cancer.

Vitamin D Supplementation for Vampires

Ideally testing for vitamin D levels should be carried out on vampires to determine ideal dosing. As vampires are notoriously secretive, and very few laboratories are open after dark, testing may be difficult to attain. I suggest all vampires consider a vitamin D supplement, to ensure their needs are met. A general guideline for humans and vampires is to take a minimum of 1000IU per day. Your Naturopathic Doctor can help to individualize your dose based on your body weight and sun exposure (or lack thereof).

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes by the supernatural community. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed monster doctor. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Frankenstein, or other primary care provider is recommended for any supernatural being suffering from a health problem.

Hormone Harmony during Breastfeeding

Going through my pregnancies with my two sons, and supporting hundreds of women in my practice through their pregnancies and beyond, I am always interested in the information that is given to pregnant women and what that says about what our society deems important.

Women going through pregnancy know a lot – they know what to eat, what to avoid, when their baby develops eyelashes (32 weeks) and what position to sleep in. They know how to track contractions, how often to breastfeed and the best positions for breastfeeding.

What women know very little about is what is happening in their own bodies. What the hormonal changes that occur during pregnancy, breastfeeding and the postnatal stage mean for their own energy, emotions and health.

This article is here to close that gap – to help women understand the hormonal changes that occur during breastfeeding and when that hormone balance is normal, and when to seek support when it is not.

Breastfeeding Hormones

Breastfeeding is associated with production of two specific hormones: prolactin and oxytocin. These two hormones allow for peak production of breastmilk as well as bonding with your new babe. Let’s look at each one in more detail.

Prolactin

Prolactin, or “pro-lactation hormone” is produced during breastfeeding to increase breast milk supply. Levels rise for almost an hour after the baby begins to feed, encouraging the alveoli in the breasts to make milk.

But that is not all prolactin does. In fact, not just breastfeeding parents produce it – all parents produce it. Prolactin is a calming and relaxing hormone that decreases progesterone and testosterone production in both parents. It can cause mothers to feel deep relaxation (and sometimes deep fatigue) during breastfeeding and for some time after.

Interestingly, prolactin is also released during sexual intimacy, counteracting the effects of dopamine (which is associated with sexual arousal) and resulting in a sensation of gratification and calm. With high circulating levels of prolactin during the breastfeeding stage, there is often less sex drive – your body feels like it’s already in the afterglow, and your libido is no where to be seen.

Oxytocin

Mostly commonly referred to as the “love hormone”, oxytocin is released to encourage let down during breastfeeding. Oxytocin increases bonding and is produced in both parents during cuddling and intimate contact – with both the baby and with each other. Oxytocin levels are highest during new relationships, such as with your brand new baby, and while baby is breastfeeding.

Most of the time we respond to oxytocin in positive ways – it feels good to be awash in these bonding hormones. But it isn’t this way for all women. Some women are very sensitive to such high levels of oxytocin and feel more anxious, irritable or overwhelmed while breastfeeding.

Women’s Hormones in Breastfeeding

It is no surprise that women’s hormones fluctuate a lot in the time after pregnancy – after all, those hormones that helped to sustain the pregnancy are now dropping off (quickly!) to pre-pregnancy levels. How a woman feels in the months, and years, after her baby is born has a lot to do with the balance of her hormones.

Estrogen

Estrogen levels can hit menopausal levels for the months after giving birth – and for some women they stay low throughout the time she is breastfeeding. Low estrogen levels can cause mood swings, irritability, hot flashes and night sweats as well as vaginal dryness, tenderness and discomfort during sexual intercourse. Low estrogen can also zap your desire for sexual intimacy (let alone how dry your lady garden is…) Using a water-based lubricant, and engaging in foreplay can help to overcome some of these low estrogen issues, but if the concern persists, talk to your ND about a low dose topical estriol cream.

Low estrogen can also contribute to an increased incidence of yeast infections, especially in women who are prone to them. If this happens, talk to your Naturopathic Doctor about treatments that are safe during breastfeeding.

Progesterone

Progesterone – “pro-gestation hormone” is at sky-high levels during pregnancy and it can feel like a rollercoaster free fall when you return to pre-pregnancy baselines in the weeks after delivery. Prolactin production suppresses ovulation, especially during the first six months after delivery, and with no ovulation progesterone production is incredibly low.

Symptoms of low progesterone can include anxiety, depression, mood swings, low libido, and insomnia. Many clinicians believe that low progesterone is a contributing factor to the development of post-partum depression in some women. There are many available treatments for post-partum depression, if you are concerned that you may have PPD, talk to your Naturopathic Doctor right away.

Testosterone

Produced mainly by the ovaries, but also in the adrenal glands, testosterone levels are also low in breastfeeding women. Testosterone can contribute to sexual desire, as well as sexual response. Low levels can impact mood, focus and libido.

Beyond Hormones

The months after giving birth are a challenging time for everyone. My take home message here is that while lack of sleep, and an exhausting schedule are huge factors in the way women feel during the months and years of breastfeeding, there are also hormonal influences at play that need to be considered.

If you have been feeling off, feeling exhausted, or have mood swings or low moods don’t just attribute it to the busy-ness of having a baby – talk to someone about how you can support your hormones and restore your hormone harmony throughout breastfeeding.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

The PMS Diet

Premenstrual syndrome may hit you like a storm each month, throwing your mood and your body into chaos and misery. But does it have to be like that? We all know women who sail through their cycles with not a concern in the world. Is it possible that we all can achieve that level of hormone harmony and banish our PMS symptoms? Yes, I believe it is.

The PMS Diet

My philosophy is that health comes from the balance of three key components:

  1. What we put into our bodies (food, alcohol, drugs, etc.)
  2. How we move our body (exercise, flexibility, play, etc.)
  3. The thoughts we hold in our mind-body (gratitude, self love, frustration, etc.)

With this philosophy at the core of my approach, I often suggest that women with hormone imbalances consider the impact of their diet. And in PMS your diet can have a huge impact – for good, or for bad. So lets get to it and discuss how you can have an impact on your PMS by optimizing your diet.

  1. Quit sugar

Ladies, you know this one. But it is so damn hard to do – your body can send some pretty strong cravings for sugar when hormone imbalances associated with PMS cause your serotonin to plummet. But sugar is not going to make anything better.

Women who experience PMS eat, on average, 275% more refined sugar than women who do not have PMS. What?!! That’s a ton of sugar! And women with PMS also consume between 200-500 more calories per day – typically in the forms of carbohydrates, fats and sweets. That is not going to make anyone feel better!

The main issue is that sugar increases the loss of magnesium in the urine – and magnesium deficiency is thought to be the cause of a lot of PMS symptoms, including fatigue, irritability, brain fog, insomnia as well as period cramps. Just to add to your misery, sugar also increases salt and water retention, leading to swelling and breast tenderness. Ugh.

  1. Avoid alcohol

We’re still in common sense country here, but avoiding alcohol really is something you need to do if you want to balance your hormones and eliminate PMS. While reaching for a glass of wine (or two) is tempting when you’re in a PMS rage, you are not making things any better. Alcohol can inhibit your liver’s ability to detoxify hormones, and can lead to higher circulating estrogen levels. This can exacerbate the imbalance of hormones that is already thought to cause PMS – high estrogen to low progesterone.  So consider making a cup of tea instead, and skip the alcohol for your own sake.

  1. Cut the caffeine

I’m really not making any friends with this article. I’m feeling like a bit of a buzz kill! But let’s talk straight – hormone imbalances are strongly associated with our behaviours. And we can change our behaviours!

Drinking coffee, and other caffeine-containing beverages, has been found to be associated with PMS, and with a greater severity of PMS. If you have PMS, I encourage you to try a cycle without caffeine and see if you notice an improvement, a lot of the women in my practice have found this to have a huge impact.

  1. Skip the salt

If you experience bloating, breast tenderness or swelling during PMS, you should check your diet to see if you are eating too much salt. Mostly found in processed food, salt can contribute to water retention, and swelling. Skipping prepared, processed and fast foods should bring your salt intake down to a balanced and healthy level.

  1. Get complex

Breads, bagels, crackers, pasta and other simple carbohydrates are setting you up for blood sugar instability and almost guaranteeing a miserable PMS. Instead of these foods, opt for the complex carbohydrates, these are slower to digest, keep you full longer and your blood sugar stable. Women who eat more complex carbohydrates also eat more fiber, an important nutrient that promotes estrogen elimination from the body.

So banish the bread and instead go for whole grains – brown rice, oats, quinoa, millet, and amaranth are delicious. And try sweet potatoes, squash, lentils, and beans for filling complex carbohydrates.

  1. Go green

Leafy greens are a PMS fighting superfood! A rich source of calcium and magnesium, leafy greens also support liver function, encouraging the liver to detoxify and eliminate excess estrogen. Choose your favourite leafy greens and eat them every day – kale, spinach, arugula, swiss chard or collard greens are all excellent choices!

  1. Go fish!

Fish, and other foods that are rich in vitamin B6, are important for any woman struggling with PMS. B6, a water-soluble nutrient, is involved in over 100 reactions in our body, many of which are involved in the production of hormones and neurotransmitters. Vitamin B6 is one of the best studied nutrients for PMS, and it has been found to help restore balance for women with PMS and reduce symptoms, especially mood symptoms such as irritation, anger and sadness.

  1. Open sesame

Sesame seeds are an excellent source of calcium, and clinical trials have found that women with the highest intake of calcium have the lowest incidence of PMS symptoms. While most studies have been on calcium supplements, increasing dietary calcium is a great place to start.

Other great sources of calcium include tofu, sardines, leafy greens, cabbage, broccoli, green beans, squash, bean sprouts, almonds, brazil nuts, quinoa, chickpeas, beans and oranges.

  1. Beans, beans, beans!

There are many reasons why beans pack a powerful punch in treating PMS. Beans are an excellent source of magnesium, one of the most important nutrient imbalances in PMS. Taken as a supplement, magnesium can improve mood, reduce breast tenderness and relieve pain during periods.

But beans offer more than just magnesium. They also are a rich source of fiber and protein. Women who consume a mostly vegetarian diet have lower incidence of PMS and lower levels of estrogen – both benefits that can be achieved by just increasing the beans in your diet.

  1. Boost Bacteria

Fermented foods, like kim chi, sauerkraut, kombucha and kefir all contain probiotics – healthy bacteria that can live in our digestive tracts and support our overall health. Healthy bacteria do more than just help our digestion, they also support hormone balance – especially estrogen elimination, an important component of managing PMS.

When your bacteria balance is optimal your body is able to easily eliminate estrogen. When your bacteria levels are out of balance estrogen levels increase and can significantly contribute to PMS. So try some fermented foods, or take a daily probiotic to balance your bacteria.

 Diet and More

Diet is an excellent place to start in treating your PMS.  It may seem simple, but simple things can sometimes be incredibly powerful.  Each action you take on a daily basis, each food you eat, or those foods you don’t eat, all influence your hormone balance and determine whether you sail through PMS or struggle.  Once you have started with these dietary changes, if you are still experiencing symptoms, check out my top treatments for PMS, ask whether you may be experiencing PMDD or take a refresher on the hormonal imbalances of PMS.  And if you are ready to take the next step, feel free to get in touch so we can work together on resolving your PMS.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

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150 Symptoms of PMS

With 3 out of 4 women experiencing some symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, most of us can come up with a pretty good list of symptoms for ourselves. But did you know that 150 symptoms have been identified? That’s a pretty substantial number!

Ranging from mild bloating to severe mood changes and migraines, and everything in between, PMS can seriously impact a woman’s mood, quality of life, and relationships.

And remember, you don’t just have to accept PMS. You can manage it and treat it effectively. But that’s in another article. This one is The 150 Symptoms of PMS.

Digestive Symptoms

  1. Bloating
  2. Weight gain
  3. Constipation
  4. Diarrhea
  5. Nausea
  6. Vomiting
  7. Gas
  8. Cravings for salt
  9. Cravings for sweets
  10. Cravings for alcohol
  11. Increased appetite
  12. Decreased appetite
  13. Increased sensitivity to alcohol
  14. Increased sensitivity to taste/ spices/ flavour
  15. Increased thirst

Physical Symptoms

  1. Fatigue
  2. Water retention and swelling
  3. Increased sweating
  4. Night sweats
  5. Hot flashes
  6. Fatigue
  7. Increased sleep hours/ desire for sleep
  8. Clumsiness
  9. Easy bruising
  10. Increased heart rate
  11. Irregular heart beat
  12. Increased sensitivity to light
  13. Increased sensitivity to sound
  14. Increased sensitivity to touch
  15. Increased sensitivity to chemicals
  16. Seizures

Ear, Nose, Throat and Head

  1. Tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
  2. Dizziness
  3. Lightheadedness
  4. Headaches
  5. Migraines
  6. Cold sore outbreaks
  7. Puffy eyes
  8. Blurred vision
  9. Hordeolum (eye stye)
  10. Dry mouth
  11. Rhinitis (runny nose)
  12. Worsening of allergy symptoms
  13. Increased sensitivity to odours

Respiratory System

  1. Shortness of breath
  2. Worsening of asthma
  3. Sore throat
  4. Sensation of lump in throat
  5. Hoarse voice

Muscles, Bones and Joints

  1. Back pain
  2. Leg pain
  3. Joint pain or worsening arthritis
  4. Muscle weakness
  5. Muscle stiffness

Lady Garden Symptoms

  1. More frequent urination
  2. More frequent yeast infections
  3. More frequent urinary tract infections
  4. More frequent HSV outbreaks
  5. Dry vaginal tract
  6. Painful intercourse

Breast Symptoms

  1. Breast tenderness
  2. Breast swelling
  3. Increase in breast size

Skin Symptoms

  1. Acne
  2. Dry skin
  3. Oily skin
  4. Oily scalp
  5. Increased sweating
  6. Swelling of face or extremities
  7. Worsening of rosacea
  8. Worsening of eczema
  9. Worsening of psoriasis

Mood and Emotional Symptoms

  1. Increased libido
  2. Decreased libido
  3. Poor decision making
  4. Eating disorders
  5. Anger
  6. Aggression
  7. Irritation
  8. Forgetfulness
  9. Indecisiveness
  10. Poor concentration
  11. Brain fog
  12. Inability to think clearly
  13. Poor learning, less able to retain information
  14. Lack of motivation
  15. Increased sensitivity
  16. Avoidance of social interaction
  17. Avoidance of responsibilities
  18. Withdrawn
  19. Confusion
  20. Excitability
  21. Mood swings
  22. Restlessness
  23. Hopelessness
  24. Anxiety
  25. Depression
  26. Loneliness
  27. Guilt
  28. Apathy
  29. Poor self esteem
  30. Reduced confidence
  31. Jealousy
  32. Paranoia
  33. Fearfulness
  34. Tension
  35. Poor coping
  36. Inability to relax
  37. Feeling keyed up or on edge
  38. Sadness
  39. Suicidal thoughts
  40. Frequent outbursts
  41. Sudden outbursts
  42. Feeling overwhelmed
  43. Feeling out of control
  44. Difficulty controlling anger or sadness
  45. Crying
  46. Melancholy
  47. Defensiveness
  48. Stubbornness
  49. Negative outlook
  50. More easily offended
  51. More easily hurt or upset
  52. Lack of coordination
  53. Intentional self harm
  54. Increased addictive behaviours (shopping, drugs, alcohol)
  55. Increased productivity
  56. Decreased productivity
  57. Hypersomnia
  58. Insomnia
  59. Lack of pleasure in life
  60. Worsening of pre-existing mental health concerns
  61. Possible increase in criminal behaviour

Well, try as I might, I could only find 133 symptoms of PMS.  To be considered a PMS symptom, it must have the following characteristics:

  1. Restricted to the luteal phase (second half) of the menstrual cycle
  2. Resolve by the four day of the next cycle (fourth day of the period)
  3. Cause impairment or distress for the woman
  4. Occur in at least two cycles
  5. Not be an exacerbation of another condition

Can you think of any PMS symptoms I may have missed? Were you surprised by any of the symptoms on here? Let me know in the comments below!

 

PMS or PMDD?

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a many-headed beast – with over 150 different symptoms attributed to PMS, many women find the week before their period to be a challenging time.

But what about those women who are completely destroyed by their PMS? Who suffer with severe mood changes, insomnia and fatigue? For those women, they may be suffering from PMDD – premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

A Diagnosis of PMDD

PMDD is classified as a depressive disorder. It is not the same as clinical depression as it occurs with a very specific timing – during the second half of the menstrual cycle, after ovulation, and it resolves within a few days of starting your period.

PMDD causes a lot of distress and significantly impacts a woman’s ability to function and to maintain her quality of life. Between 2-6% of women experience PMDD, but many of them don’t seek treatment and instead suffer each month with severe symptoms.

PMDD is different from PMS in the severity of symptoms and the consequences of the mood changes.   The diagnosis is made by using symptom tracking reports and needs to meet the following criteria:

Treatment of PMDD

The conventional approach to treating PMDD results in most women being given one of two options: the birth control pill, or an antidepressant. While these treatments may be effective for some women, many more women are seeking a more natural, empowered approach to managing their PMDD.

Natural Approaches to PMDD

In my article on Ten Natural Treatments for PMS I discuss the lifestyle and diet for managing PMS. I suggest all women with PMDD also follow those recommendations. But for PMDD I tend to take a more aggressive approach – the symptoms are often severe enough to warrant a very targeted and bold plan.

Vitamin B6

Used in both PMS and PMDD, vitamin B6 is necessary for the production of cortisol, progesterone and serotonin – all hormones involved in PMS and PMDD. Taking high (orthomolecular) doses of vitamin B6 can be helpful at reducing symptoms of PMS and PMDD. Vitamin B6 is usually taken all month long, but higher doses can be used in the second half of the cycle if needed.

Calcium

Calcium has been found in studies to reduce a wide variety of symptoms associated with PMS. While I don’t find it to be useful on its own, in a robust protocol calcium can play a role in reducing both the mood and physical symptoms of PMS and PMDD.

L-tryptophan and 5-HTP

Two supplements that can increase the production of serotonin in the body, L-tryptophan and 5-HTP, show a lot of promise in the treatment of PMDD. Supporting the serotonin system in women has been one of the most effective means of treating PMDD. L-tryptophan and 5-HTP are the direct precursors of serotonin and can significantly reduce mood symptoms of PMDD. These supplements are not taken together, and should not be combined with other antidepressants. Use under the guidance of a knowledgeable and experienced Naturopathic Doctor.

St. John’s Wort

One of the most commonly used botanical medicines, St. John’s Wort is an excellent treatment for women with PMDD. Acting on the serotonin system in the body, St. John’s Wort can reduce depressive symptoms of PMDD and improve mood. It can be taken all month long, or just during the second half of the menstrual cycle.

Chaste Berry

Chaste berry (chaste tree, Vitex agnus-castus), which I also discussed in the PMS article, has been found to be effective for PMDD. Chaste berry can reduce anger, irritability, anxiety, mood swings, and physical symptoms associated with PMS and PMDD. My experience is that it can be moderately effective for PMDD, but often additional treatments are needed to help women feel considerably better.

IV Micronutrient Therapy

One treatment that I have found to drastically improve PMS and PMDD symptoms in women is IV micronutrient therapy (IVMT). IVMT allows us to administer doses of vitamins (like B6, calcium and magnesium) at higher doses than you would be able to take orally. IV therapy also provides an abundance of nutrients necessary for detoxification of hormones – and reducing the hormone burden in the body can greatly improve symptoms of PMDD. Not every woman is a candidate for IVMT, but talk to your Naturopath to find out if you are.

Bio-Identical Progesterone

While we don’t know exactly what causes PMS and PMDD, one suspect in this mystery is an imbalance of estrogen and progesterone – often called estrogen dominance. When progesterone levels are unstable, or low, and estrogen levels are high, PMS and PMDD depression and mood swings can result. For some women, especially those in their 40s, bio-identical progesterone can be a lifesaver. Your ND will give you a questionnaire to identify a possible progesterone imbalance, and may also recommend hormone testing.

Empowering Your Journey

If you are interested in learning more about how to manage your PMDD, I suggest working with a qualified Naturopathic Doctor who can guide you on this journey.  PMDD is too severe, and too complex to try and piece together a treatment on your own.  Working with an ND who can guide and support you on this journey may be the best decision you make for your health and your sanity.

Select Resources

Comprehensive Gynecology, Seventh Edition. Ed. Lobo R, Gershenson D, Lentz G. 2017; 37, 815-828.

Ferri’s Clinical Advisor. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder. Ed. Ferri FF. 2019

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

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