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Estrogen Dominance

Estrogen dominance – it’s the most common hormone imbalance for women in their 40s and has symptoms that will sound familiar to many of you – but many women don’t realize this imbalance even exists. So let’s shed some light on this imbalance so that no woman has to suffer in silence anymore.

Women’s Hormones 101

To understand estrogen dominance, first we have to start with a quick refresher on our two primary female hormones – estrogen and progesterone.

Estrogen is the main hormone in the first half of our menstrual cycle and causes the lining of the uterus to thicken. Estrogen is produced by the ovaries, but also by fat cells. Estrogen levels can also be raised by exposure to xenoestrogens – compounds in our environment that look like estrogen and are able to bind to estrogen receptors.

Progesterone is the main hormone in the second half of our cycle, and supports implantation and pregnancy. Increases in progesterone signal the body to stop making so much estrogen. Progesterone is made almost completely by the ovaries, but small amounts can be made in the adrenal glands as well.

WTF is Estrogen Dominance?

Women are born with all their eggs – so the eggs we ovulate each month have been along for the entire ride of our lives. As our eggs age their quality decreases – this has two major impacts that set us up for estrogen dominance.

  1. Older eggs take longer to mature – an older egg may be slower to reach maturity – this causes the brain to produce higher levels of FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) to attempt to mature the egg. The higher the FSH, the more follicles that are stimulated and the higher the estrogen production.

While many women believe estrogen levels decline in our 40s, the opposite is in fact true. Estrogen levels only significantly decline at menopause.

  1. Older eggs produce less progesterone – one of the main reasons our fertility drops off with age is that our older eggs make less progesterone. This drop in progesterone production can impact much more than our fertility – it is also the reason that PMS is more intense in our 40s and sets the stage for estrogen dominance.

Estrogen dominance is the state where estrogen levels are not balanced by progesterone levels – too high estrogen and too low progesterone. And this is where the chaos begins…

Symptoms of Estrogen Dominance

Not sure yet if you are dealing with estrogen dominance? Read these symptoms and see if they ring true for you.

  • Anxiety
  • Depression
  • Mood swings
  • Irritability
  • Insomnia
  • Bloating
  • Carbohydrate and sugar cravings
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Brain fog
  • Weight gain or difficulty losing weight
  • Frequent yeast infections
  • Joint pain or inflammation
  • Heavy or irregular periods (longer or shorter cycles)
  • More PMS
  • Headaches and migraines premenstrually
  • Swelling and water retention
  • Lack of sex drive/ low libido
  • Breast tenderness or swelling
  • Uterine fibroids

Why Haven’t I Heard of Estrogen Dominance?

Unfortunately a woman who presents to her doctor with the symptoms listed above will often be dismissed (It’s just stress! You’re getting older – it happens), be given an antidepressant, be put on the birth control pill (to “regulate” hormones) or told to relax, lose weight, or get counseling. Very rarely will a doctor delve into the hormonal fluctuations with hormone testing, or even discuss the likely imbalances that occur in our 40s.

Testing for Estrogen Dominance

For some women the symptoms are so clear that testing may not be necessary. But for most women, hormone testing is recommended to get a clear picture of what her individual hormone balance is, and to develop a plan that will help to restore her personal hormone harmony.

DUTCH test, hormone testing,hormone test, women's hormones, hormone healthHormone testing can be done via blood tests, saliva tests or the DUTCH urine test. I go into greater detail on hormone testing in this article: Hormone Testing Options

For any hormone test that is done, the most important thing to look for is balance. Many women are dismissed as “normal” when their hormone values are all within the normal limits. But more important than the actual value of the hormones, is the balance between the hormones. If estrogen is normal but progesterone is very low, estrogen dominance occurs. If estrogen is high but progesterone is normal, estrogen dominance occurs. You need to ensure that whoever is interpreting your tests with you has a great deal of knowledge on hormone balance.

It’s Not Just About Your Periods

As you can see from the list of symptoms above, estrogen dominance impacts a lot more than just our periods and our PMS. All our hormones function in harmony with each other – and when one hormone is imbalanced, there can be significant ripple effects on the other hormones. Below are just a few:

Estrogen dominance worsens hypothyroid – high levels of estrogen lead to an increased clearance of our energizing thyroid hormones – this can lead to symptoms of hypothyroidism (fatigue, brain fog, weight gain, hair loss) or worsen symptoms in women who have this condition

Estrogen dominance is worsened by stress – increased production of cortisol, as occurs during times of stress, lowers progesterone levels. Cortisol also competes with progesterone for receptors – which can cause symptoms of estrogen dominance even when progesterone levels are adequate. This can worsen symptoms of stress like irritability, decreased coping, fatigue and overwhelm.

Treatment of Estrogen Dominance

When we are treating estrogen dominance we have two main goals in mind – lower the estrogen and increase the progesterone.

Lowering Estrogen

  1. Decrease exposure to xenoestrogens – Commonly found in plastics, personal care products and household cleaners, avoiding exposure to the synthetic estrogens that are abundant in our environment is an essential first step.
  2. Support estrogen detoxification – B vitamins, probiotics, brassica vegetables, DIM and 13C are all essential for allowing your body to clear the estrogen and restore balance to your body. Your Naturopathic Doctor will help you to determine what the best choices are for you – but starting with a B complex supplement, a probiotic and choosing more foods in the cabbage family (broccoli, cauliflower, kale, cabbage, Brussels sprouts) is recommended.

Increasing Progesterone

  1. Make sure you can make it – essential nutrients for the production of progesterone include B vitamins (especially vitamin B6), and magnesium. So ensuring you have an abundance of these in your diet, or in supplement form, is important for overcoming estrogen dominance.
  2. Bioidentical progesterone cream – sometimes the only way to overcome estrogen dominance is to add back some of what we need – progesterone. Available in Canada as a prescription from your Naturopath, bioidentical progesterone provides your body with the progesterone you no longer make as easily. It can be a life changing treatment for many women in their 40s.

Harmonizing Hormones

Our 40s as women can be a tumultuous time – raising children, achieving career success, supporting spouses, aging parents – any number of significant life events. But our hormones don’t need to be tumultuous. We can support our bodies and our minds by focusing on achieving our individual hormone harmony. If you want to discuss more about your hormone health, book a free meet and greet or an appointment today.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

WTF Is Happening: Hormones in Your 40s

This event is for all those women who are wondering WTF is happening with my hormones?

As we move through our 40s our hormones enter into a “second puberty” – a time of significant upheaval in our previously balanced state.  And if you thought puberty was bad – try having kids and partners and jobs on top of it!

If you are curious if your hormones are contributing to your:

  • Mood changes, anxiety, depression, PMS or what we affectionately call “werewolfing”
  • Low libido (or high libido!  It happens!)
  • Acne, hair growth, or hair loss
  • Irregular periods, no periods, heavy periods, sometimes all of these, sometimes none of them
  • Breast changes
  • Insomnia or sleep changes
  • Or so many, many other issues

Then please join me at Oma Chiropractic on Thursday, May 31st as we drop some truth bombs on what REALLY IS HAPPENING during our 40s.

You can find more information on the Facebook Event page here:  https://www.facebook.com/events/161921597814032/ 

Hope to see you there!

PCOS and Mental Health

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most common hormone imbalance in women and yet very few people are talking about how significantly this imbalance is impacting women’s lives.

PCOS can impact any woman, at any age – from puberty to perimenopause, and in addition to the typical symptoms of irregular or absent periods, acne, facial hair growth and scalp hair loss, there can also be an increased incidence of mental health concerns.

PCOS and Depression

It has been my experience in practice that women with PCOS often have signs of depression – many of them due to the effects the symptoms of PCOS have on their body image. Researchers have found that nearly ¼ of women with PCOS have depression and they too suggest it may be linked to the “emotionally distressing” symptoms associated with PCOS, rather than the underlying hormone imbalance itself.

PCOS and Anxiety

Rates of anxiety are also higher in women with PCOS, with 11.5% of women in one study having both diagnoses (compared to an average 9% in the general female population).

Anxiety may be associated both with the physical symptoms of PCOS, but potentially may also stem from the hormone imbalances, such as low progesterone, that are common in PCOS. Progesterone is an anxiety-lowering hormone and low levels of progesterone occur when there is no ovulation – such as in PCOS.

PCOS and ADHD

Another interesting finding from the 2018 study on PCOS and mental health – women who have PCOS have an increased risk of having children who are diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) or an autism spectrum disorder. The researchers suggest that it may be due to higher circulating androgens during development.

Support for PCOS and Mental Health

Focusing on whole body health, rather than just the visible symptoms of PCOS is important for all women with PCOS. While most women will want to focus on clearing acne and decreasing body weight, we must look at women as a complex entity of interlacing systems – ladies, we are all unicorns – we need to be treated individually and with attention to our specific wants and needs. Our mental and physical health are one and the same, and we should seek care from health care providers who recognize that.

Your Naturopathic Doctor can help you to put together a plan that focuses on your diet, lifestyle, obstacles to health, hormonal imbalances and mental and spiritual health.  Looking at your life and health as a whole, rather than individual symptoms to be managed, your ND works with you to achieve optimal health – in all areas of your life.

Select References

Thomas R Berni Christopher L Morgan Ellen R Berni D Aled Rees.  Polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with adverse mental health and neurodevelopment outcomes.  The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, jc.2017-02667

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

PCOS and Hair Loss

My personal experience with hair loss in my early 20s has given me a keen passion to support women with hair loss of any cause. In other articles I’ve discussed the Root Causes of Female Hair Loss and Alopecia Areata but in this article I’m discussing the hormonal hair loss associated with PCOS.

PCOS: Hormone Havoc

In polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) the ovaries do not respond appropriately to hormonal cues from the brain (the pituitary gland to be precise), resulting in the formation of cysts in the ovaries.

These cysts are actually unsuccessfully ovulated follicles – in normal ovulation the follicle ruptures and releases an egg. But in PCOS the follicle continues to grow and becomes a cyst.

Because the follicle does not release the egg, and continues to grow, it also continues to release hormones – mostly estrogen and testosterone. And it is this hormonal havoc that can lead to hair loss.

Testosterone and Hair Loss

High levels of testosterone are known to contribute to hair loss, and women with PCOS often have elevated levels of testosterone and other androgens (including dihydrotestosterone – a super powerful form of testosterone).

The testosterone can bind to receptors in the scalp hair follicles, stimulating hair loss in a male pattern – typically hair is lost at the front of the hair line, and at the very top of the head. It’s usually in a diffuse pattern – meaning the hair falls out all over rather than in patches.

The low progesterone that occurs in PCOS (progesterone is only produced after ovulation – no ovulation, no progesterone) also binds to those same hormone receptors in the hair follicle – preventing hair loss from occurring. So the balance of high (or even normal) testosterone and little to no progesterone causes the hair loss we see in PCOS.

Treating PCOS Hair Loss

The goal of treatment in hair loss associated with PCOS is to get you ovulating again. The balance of hormones in a healthy menstrual cycle should prevent hair loss from occurring. In the early stages of treatment we may also use treatments like saw palmetto, spearmint, berberine or inositol to decrease the testosterone levels.

As with all treatments for hair loss, the benefits take time to become apparent. The life cycle of the hair is three months – any hairs that have already been triggered by testosterone to fall out will do so for the first few months. So don’t give up on your treatment if you don’t see a benefit right away. The work you do now will benefit future you.

If you have any questions about your hair loss – whether it is associated with PCOS or any other condition, book a free 15 minute consultation so we can talk.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Diagnosing PCOS

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is one of the most common conditions that I treat in my hormone balancing practice. It affects 1 out of every 10 women and shows up in many different ways – hair loss, facial hair growth, acne, difficulty losing weight, irregular menstrual periods or infertility. Because of the many different symptoms of PCOS, an accurate diagnosis is important.

The Rotterdam Criteria

In 2003 the Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) came up with a specific criteria for making a diagnosis of PCOS – The Rotterdam Criteria.  Diagnosis of PCOS requires that a woman meets two of three criteria:

  1. Infrequent or no ovulation (resulting in irregular or absent menstrual periods)
  2. Signs and symptoms or laboratory tests that show high androgen (male hormone) levels – these include acne, hair loss, facial hair growth, darkening of the skin at skin folds
  3. Cysts on the ovaries on ultrasound

For a diagnosis of PCOS it is also important to rule out other causes of these symptoms, such as a pituitary, thyroid or adrenal disease.

Clinical Evaluation

taking-notesThe first step in diagnosis of PCOS is a thorough evaluation with your medical or naturopathic doctor. Your doctor will ask a lot of questions. Be sure to share if you experience any of the following:

  1. Irregular periods – menstrual cycles that are longer than 35 days, infrequent periods or no periods at all can all be associated with anovulation and PCOS.  (Keep in mind: 1 in 5 women with PCOS still have regular periods, so having a regular period does not rule out PCOS)
  1. Acne – facial, chest, or back acne can be a sign of elevated androgens
  2. Hirsutism – abnormal growth of coarse hair in a male pattern (lip, chin, torso)
  3. Hair loss – elevated androgens is a major cause of head hair loss in women
  4. Oily hair or skin
  5. lump-sugar-549096_640Sugar cravings – a sign of insulin imbalance, one of the major hormonal imbalances in PCOS. Other symptoms include dizziness, lightheadedness or irritability (or “hangry”) if a meal is missed.
  6. Recurrent yeast infections – a sign of elevated blood sugar levels. Other symptoms include excess thirst and frequent urination.
  7. Overweight or difficulty losing weight – often a cause, and consequence, of the hormone imbalances in PCOS
  8. Darkening of the skin – especially at the back of the neck or in the skin folds at the underarms, under the breasts and between the thighs. This darkened skin is called acanthosis nigricans and is associated with elevated testosterone.
  9. Infertility – difficulty getting pregnant is often the driving factor for a diagnosis for PCOS
  10. Family history of PCOS or diabetes

Laboratory Testing

Laboratory testing is the second criteria for a PCOS diagnosis. Many different lab tests can be used to confirm a suspected PCOS diagnosis, and these tests may highlight the underlying hormonal imbalances that cause PCOS. If you are taking the birth control pill to suppress your PCOS symptoms these tests will not provide accurate information.

Luteinizing hormone (LH) – high – produced by the pituitary gland to stimulate ovulation, levels are often elevated because ovulation is not occurring

Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) – normal or low – typically assessed in relation to LH levels, some women with have a higher than normal LH:FSH ratio (greater than 1:1)

PCOS laboratory testingSerum testosterone (free and total testosterone) – high – 80% of women with PCOS have elevated levels of androgens. DHT levels may also be elevated

Progesterone – low – during the second half (luteal phase) of the menstrual cycle progesterone levels will be low due to the lack of ovulation

Estradiol – normal – typically in PCOS estrogen levels are normal or slightly elevated

Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG ) – low – if tested, levels may be low

Fasting blood glucose – high – women with abnormal blood sugar levels typically have higher body weight, have higher androgen levels and are more insulin resistance

HbA1C – high – a long term (3 month) measure of blood sugar stability

Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) – high – levels of AMH are often elevated in PCOS due to the lack of regular ovulation

DHEAS – high – half of women with PCOS will have elevated adrenal production of DHEAS

Prolactin – normal – elevated prolactin can cause symptoms similar to PCOS; if your prolactin levels are high a pituitary tumour must be ruled out.

Thyroid stimulating hormone – normal – should be measured to rule out other causes of menstrual irregularities

Cortisol – normal – should be measured to rule out Cushing’s syndrome

Additionally, a pelvic or transvaginal ultrasound may reveal multiple 2-6mm follicular (simple) cysts on the ovaries. Ovarian volume or area may also be increased.

Moving Beyond Diagnosis

PCOS DietAn appropriate diagnosis of PCOS is important for women seeking optimal hormone balance. But the diagnosis is only the beginning. Your naturopathic doctor can be your partner as you move beyond diagnosis towards understanding and hormone balance. Read the other articles in the PCOS Series by Dr. Lisa Watson: Understanding PCOS, The PCOS Diet (also available as an infographic), PCOS and Infertility, PCOS in Adolescence, PCOS and Pregnancy, Hormonal Balance in PCOS and Naturopathic Medicine for PCOS.

Dr. Watson is currently accepting new patients at both her Toronto clinics. Contact her for a complimentary meet and greet appointment, or book your initial consultation today. The best time to start balancing your hormones is now.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Pin this article for later: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/207165651589076259/

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PCOS & Berberine

While your medical doctor may not have heard of it, the functional and naturopathic medicine community is raving about berberine for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). And if you haven’t heard about it – you are about to go to school on WHY berberine may be exactly the treatment you have been looking for.

What is Berberine?

Berberine is a compound (technically a quaternary ammonium salt – damn! science!) found in several plants – most notably barberry, Oregon grape and goldenseal.  It has been used as a medicine in Traditional Chinese Medicine for over 5000 years.

Berberine Improves Insulin Responsiveness

One of the key findings in many women with PCOS is a poor response to insulin. When the cells (including those of the ovaries) stop responding to insulin, energy goes down, weight gain goes up and many of the hormone imbalances associated with PCOS show up.

One of the most common prescription treatments for PCOS is metformin, a drug that improves insulin response. But studies have found that berberine is able to do this too – and maybe even a bit better than metformin!

Berberine stimulates cells to take up glucose, so blood sugar and insulin levels drop. This can result in ovulation for women with PCOS. One study also found that the women taking berberine lost more weight than the women on metformin. Win-win!

Berberine Lowers Testosterone

The elevated testosterone associated with PCOS is the one hormone imbalance most women want addressed quickly. Elevated testosterone leads to the acne, head hair loss, chin and upper lip hair growth that women despise. Studies have demonstrated that berberine can lower testosterone levels and speed the resolution of these symptoms.

Berberine Benefits Your Gut

Berberine is not just great for your ovaries, but it’s great for your gut too. Berberine has been used for generations to treat symptoms of gas, bloating, constipation and diarrhea. Now we understand that it does this by helping increase the production of short chain fatty acids and supporting the healthy bacteria (probiotics) in our guts. Healthy bacteria help us to eliminate estrogen – minimizing the potential for estrogen dominace – another common hormone imbalance in PCOS.

Berberine Loves Your Liver

Your liver is essential in hormone balance. Berberine has been found in studies to increase the production of sex hormone binding globulin (that’s a mouthful…) or SHBG that binds to testosterone and makes it unavailable for use in your body.

Berberine has also been found to lower liver enzymes in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition that is commonly found in women who are overweight and have PCOS.

Berberine Benefits Fertility

Whether you are trying to get pregnant or just balance your hormones, it is reassuring to know that berberine can improve ovulation and pregnancy rates in women with PCOS. In women with PCOS undergoing IVF procedures, those who took berberine (no matter whether they were normal weight or overweight) had higher pregnancy rates than women using metformin or a placebo.

Berberine Boosts Weight and Fat Loss

Not every woman with PCOS is overweight (I talk about that more in the PCOS Types article), but if you are even mildly overweight berberine can help you to shed some unwanted fat.

Berberine has been found in multiple studies to support weight loss and to help target fat loss from the midsection of the body. Berberine helps to lower the production of our hunger hormone, leptin – a hormone that stimulates our appetite. Women with PCOS and women who are overweight often have abnormal levels of leptin.

Building on Berberine

Berberine is an excellent option for many women with PCOS. It can be the cornerstone for PCOS treatment and help you to achieve your dreams of hormone harmony.

Discuss with your Naturopathic Doctor if berberine is the best bet for you.  It may be used in combination with other natural treatment options, diet and lifestyle changes to improve your health and hormones, naturally.

Select Resources

Toronto Naturopath, Dr. Lisa Watson discusses the use of berberine for PCOS - polycystic ovarian syndromeAn Y, Sun Z, Zhang Y, Liu B, Guan Y, Lu M. The use of berberine for women with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing IVF treatment. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2014 Mar;80(3):425-31

Wei W, Zhao H, Wang A, Sui M, Liang K, Deng H, Ma Y, Zhang Y, Zhang H, Guan Y. A clinical study on the short-term effect of berberine in comparison to metformin on the metabolic characteristics of women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Eur J Endocrinol. 2012 Jan;166(1):99-105.

Wu X, Yao J, et al. Berberine improves insulin resistance in granulosa cells in similar way to metformin. Fertility and sterility.2006; supplement S459-S460.

Yang J et al. Berberine improves insulin sensitivity by inhibiting fat store and adjusting adipokines profile in human preadipocytes and metabolic syndrome patients. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012

Zhao L et al. Berberine improves glucogenesis and lipid metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. BMC Endocr Disord. 2017 Feb 28;17(1):13.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Natural Treatment of PCOS

PCOS is the most common hormone imbalance impacting women and teenage girls. Polycystic ovarian syndrome, meaning “multiple ovarian cysts” can start soon after puberty and can persist for years. For some women it starts later – but for all women and teenage girls, it can be an incredibly frustrating, and sometimes painful condition.

WTF is PCOS?

Ovarian cysts occur when ovulation doesn’t occur as it is supposed to. In every cycle each ovary stimulates a number of follicles to develop, one of which will release an egg at ovulation. In PCOS the follicles are stimulated to grow (totally normal), but they do not respond to the hormonal cue to release an egg at ovulation. Instead they continue to grow and form cysts within the ovary.

There are many reasons why you may not respond appropriately to the hormones and instead form ovarian cysts – you can learn more about the types of PCOS in this article.

How Do I Know If I Have PCOS?

I talk about the diagnosis of PCOS in this article, but these are the most common symptoms that may suggest a diagnosis of PCOS:

  • Irregular or absent periods
  • Infertility
  • Hair growth on the upper lip or chin
  • Hair loss from the head
  • Acne – especially on the body or on the “beard distribution” of the face
  • Weight gain or excess weight around the abdomen

If you have a family member with PCOS, you are more likely to develop it. So talk to your mom, sister, aunts and grandmothers to see if you have a family history.

If you suspect you may have PCOS, then discuss it with your MD or ND and get an appropriate diagnosis.

What Causes PCOS?

PCOS is the result of failed ovulations – so the cause can be anything that disrupts healthy ovulation. Hormone imbalances stemming from the pituitary gland, the thyroid, the adrenal glands or pancreas can all cause PCOS. Insulin resistance – when your cells no longer respond to the hormone insulin – is probably the most common hormone imbalance that leads to PCOS.

How is PCOS Treated?

In conventional care, PCOS is most often treated with the birth control pill. Other choices, like spironolactone or metformin, are also suggested if acne or insulin resistance are present. However, many women are successfully choosing a more empowered approach to treating their PCOS through diet, exercise and some health supporting supplements.

Diet and Lifestyle

While not every woman with PCOS is overweight, if you are, losing weight is an important goal. Losing as little as 5% of your body weight can reverse insulin resistance, promote ovulation and decrease testosterone (less acne and chin/lip hair!)

I go into great detail on the basics of the PCOS Diet in this article – also available as a fun infographic! Check it out for all the information you need.

Vitamins and Minerals

Many different supplements can be used for managing PCOS. These are best selected by working with your ND – knowing what your hormone imbalance is will allow you to choose those supplements most likely to work for you. Here are a few of the most helpful options:

Vitamin B6 – can help balance prolactin levels, a hormone often elevated in PCOS.

Chromium – essential for proper blood sugar regulation. Taking chromium (also known as insulin tolerance factor) increases the uptake of glucose into cells, decreasing insulin resistance.

Vitamin D – essential for healthy ovulation. Every Canadian is deficient during the winter months, and supplementation is often needed to correct that deficiency.

Herbal Medicines

Plant medicines can be incredibly powerful medicines, especially when it comes to supporting hormone balance. It depends on your type of PCOS what herbal medicines may be recommended.

Saw palmetto (Serenoa repens) – an incredibly effective hormone balancer, saw palmetto decreases the conversion of testosterone to its more powerful form, dihydrotestosterone (DHT). This makes saw palmetto an excellent choice in the treatment of acne, hair loss, and facial hair growth.

Chaste tree (Vitex agnus-castus) – one of the best known herbal medicines for PCOS, chaste tree lowers prolactin levels and raises progesterone levels. It can also restore regular ovulation, the main issue in PCOS!

Other Natural Supplements

A few honourable mentions are necessary in any discussion of PCOS – treatments that have excellent research and deserve to be considered in any woman seeking a more empowered approach to her PCOS.

Inositol – a B-like vitamin, inositol has many benefits for PCOS – it decreases insulin resistance, decreases testosterone levels and helps to promote regular ovulation. It is a super-star for PCOS treatment.

Berberine – compared in studies to metformin, berberine has powerful actions on blood sugar regulation and insulin resistance. It can reduce testosterone, and androgens. Women taking berberine also achieved greater weight loss in some studies.

Next Steps

Knowing that there are a great many different options for the treatment of PCOS, some women can feel overwhelmed by information. This is one of the many benefits of working with a Naturopathic Doctor. Your ND can help you understand your individual hormone imbalance and guide you to the treatments that will be most effective for you.

Remember, any hormone imbalance will take time to resolve. Start taking the steps now to achieve your healthy hormone balance.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Ovarian Cysts: Simple and Complex

Ovarian cysts are small growths that form on or inside of the ovary. Many women are diagnosed with ovarian cysts on routine ultrasounds, and others are diagnosed when they experience changes in their menstrual cycles or painful periods. Often women are told they have cysts without really understanding what that means. This article will give you the knowledge you need to understand your diagnosis, and empower you to select the best treatment options for you and allow you to restore your optimal hormone health.

Simple Ovarian Cysts

Simple ovarian cysts are by far the most common type of ovarian cyst. A simple cyst forms when an egg fails to be released by the ovary at ovulation, or when the follicle the egg developed in continues to grow after ovulation. Simple ovarian cysts develop with exposure to estrogen, and are sometimes called ‘functional’ cysts.

Simple cysts often have no symptoms and will resolve on their own with time. Simple cysts are often found in a condition called Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome (PCOS) where many simple cysts develop and symptoms such as a lack of periods (amenorrhea), irregular periods, infertility, acne, hair loss or facial hair growth can occur.

Complex Ovarian Cysts

Complex cysts are much less common and are not formed during a typical menstrual cycle. There are three different types of complex ovarian cysts:

  • Cystadenomas – ovarian tissue filled with fluid or mucus
  • Dermoid cysts – composed of cells you have had since before you were born. Dermoid cysts contain cells that are used to produce dermal tissue, so they can contain skin, hair, fat, or teeth.
  • Endometriomas – a result of endometriosis. Endometriomas occur when cells from your uterine lining grow on or in the ovaries.

Complex ovarian cysts are most often benign, especially those that develop before menopause. Some ovarian cysts can be malignant so it is important to have them assessed fully.

Symptoms of Ovarian Cysts

Most simple ovarian cysts do not cause any symptoms at all. Some symptoms that may alert you to the possible presence of simplex or complex cysts include:

  • Bloating, pressure, or pain in the low abdomen
  • Frequent urination (if the cyst is large and pressing on the bladder)
  • Sudden severe pain (if the cyst ruptures)

If you have endometriomas – cysts associated with endometriosis, you may experience:

  • painful periods
  • pain during sex
  • pain during bowel movements
  • infertility

What Causes Cysts?

Simple cysts (like those in PCOS) are the result of hormonal and metabolic issues. You can read more about PCOS in these articles, Understanding PCOS, PCOS Types and Diagnosing PCOS.

Complex cysts can be present from birth and grow under hormone stimulation after puberty. Endometriomas, another complex cyst, occur when the lining of the uterus grows outside of the uterus, including on the ovaries. Cystadenomas can occur when ovarian cells mutate and grow (most often these are benign, but can be cancerous).

Diagnosis of Cysts

Most cysts are diagnosed with a transvaginal ultrasound. Some can also be detected with a simple pelvic exam. Often the type of cyst can be identified with an ultrasound, but occasionally a biopsy or blood test (such as CA-125) may also be used.

Treatment of Cysts

Simple cysts are easily treated with Naturopathic approaches – hormone balancing, blood sugar stabilization and improved ovarian response are common treatment goals.

Some complex cysts require no treatment, but some may need to be removed if they are large or causing significant symptoms. Most often the cyst is removed through a simple surgery caused laparoscopy.

Endometriomas are treated in the same manner as other types of endometriosis. If you have endometriosis, please read the Endometriosis series of articles written by Dr. Lisa on this website.

 

If you have any more questions about your ovarian cysts, don’t hesitate to get in touch!  You can send Dr. Lisa an email or book a free 15 minute meet and greet here.

 

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Men’s Quiz: Is My Testosterone Low?

My work in hormone balance isn’t just with women – men can experience symptoms of hormone imbalance with age as well.  Testosterone is about much more than libido – it is also essential for mood, energy, muscle strength, bone density and many, MANY other actions in the body.

We know that testosterone levels decline with age – with that decline starting as early as 30 years old.  Additionally it has been found that men today are making up to a quarter less testosterone than their grandfathers did.

If you suspect you may have low testosterone, take this quiz.  And if the results suggest you have low testosterone book an appointment to discuss further testing, lifestyle and treatment options.  There are options available, including bio-identical hormone replacement therapy.

 

ADAM – Androgen Deficiency in Aging Men

This symptom based questionnaire will help diagnose low testosterone levels in men. When used with laboratory testing a diagnosis of low testosterone, or andropause, can be made.

If you answered yes to questions 1 or 7, or at least three of the other questions you may have low testosterone levels. Be sure to discuss the results of this quiz with your Naturopathic Doctor, don’t delay – the effects of low testosterone can negatively impact your quality of life and future health.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Empowered Menopause: Hot Flashes and Acupuncture

The most common complaint in menopause, hot flashes (and the dreaded night sweats) are experienced by 80% of women. For at least half of women these symptoms can last 7 to 10 years (years!!) and impact sleep, mood, comfort and quality of life.

There are many excellent treatments for hot flashes, bioidentical hormone replacement therapy, black cohosh, chaste berry, phytoestrogens and others, but acupuncture has been found in studies to be another excellent choice for women.

Acupuncture for Hot Flashes

Studies in the past 10 years have found that women with mild to moderate hot flashes and night sweats, acupuncture administered weekly can reduce the frequency of hot flashes by half (and for some women there was a nearly 90% reduction!) Compared to women who did not have acupuncture, who reported only a 10% reduction over the 8 week study, acupuncture was a very successful intervention.

How Acupuncture Works

While we don’t know all of the reasons acupuncture works so well, many researchers think that it may be due to the impact on the hypothalamus – the master regulator of our body temperature. Acupuncture has also been found to promote blood vessel dilation, increase the release of different pain-reducing endorphins, and balance the production of stress and reproductive hormones.

Why Acupuncture?

For women looking for a low risk intervention, with virtually no side effects, acupuncture can be an ideal option. Acupuncture is also very cost effective, especially for women with health care insurance coverage.

You will know within 4-6 weeks whether acupuncture is going to benefit your hot flashes. And if acupuncture is effective for you the great news is that it may continue to be effective even after you are done your sessions. One study found that the benefits seen 6 months of treatment was still providing benefit 6 months later.

If you are experiencing hot flashes or night sweats, book in today to discuss with Dr. Lisa whether acupuncture is the solution you have been looking for.

Select References

Avis NE, et al. Acupuncture in Menopause (AIM) study: a pragmatic, randomized controlled trial. Menopause: June 2016;23(6):626-637

De Valois BA, et al. Using traditional acupuncture for breast cancer-related hot flashes and night sweats. J Alt Comp Med. 2010;16(10):1047-1057

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.