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How to Select a Naturopathic Doctor

I believe that women need the medicine that Naturopathic Doctors offer.  I believe that giving women the knowledge they need to make healthy decisions for their health, and the health of their families, is one of the most powerful ways we can empower women. This is the entire reason my website exists – to share knowledge and empower women.

But I can’t be everywhere.  And I can’t treat everyone.  As a Naturopathic Doctor I am a regulated health care professional and can only practice in jurisdictions where I am licensed (Ontario, Canada).  Every week I receive emails from people across Canada and around the world who want to find someone like me.  The great news is that there are many wonderful Naturopathic Doctors out there who are making huge impacts on the health of their community.  And you can find one in your area.

How to Select a Naturopathic Doctor

The Basics

1. Do they have a degree in Naturopathic Medicine?

In North America there are only seven accredited schools where a Naturopathic Doctor can obtain a degree.  Only two of these are in Canada.  You can check the schools on the website for the Council for Naturopathic Medical Education (CNME).

2. Are they licensed to practice in the province or state where you live?

Naturopathic Medicine is not regulated the same in every province or state.  In fact, only 5 provinces (Ontario, British Columbia, Alberta, Saskatchewan and Manitoba) currently regulate Naturopathic Doctors.  Many states in the USA also regulate Naturopathic Medicine, while others are still seeking regulation.  (Click here to check if your state is regulated).

Regulation is important to ensure the safety of the public – if you are in a regulated area only see a Naturopathic Doctor who is licensed to practice in that area.  If you are not, consider finding a Naturopathic Doctor who is licensed to practice in a regulated area.

The Right Fit

3. Do they have a practice focus? 

Naturopathic Doctors are primary care physicians – trained to support a wide variety of health care conditions and concerns.  However, many Naturopaths choose to focus their practice on treating a specific concern or population.  Ask your potential ND if they have a practice focus and see if it is inline with the concerns you are seeking care for.  You don’t want to see a cancer-focused Naturopathic Doctor if you are seeking care for PCOS.

4. Do they have any additional certifications or training?

The education of Naturopathic Doctors should not end when they graduate from naturopathic medical school.  There are additional certifications and associations that Naturopathic Doctors can obtain that can enhance the services they offer.  Examples include bio-identical hormone prescribing, IV micronutrient therapy, perinatal, cancer, or pediatric associations.

The Best Practices

5. What types of assessments or testing do they offer in their practice?

One of the core tenets of Naturopathic Medicine is to treat the root cause.  How is your Naturopathic Doctor going to help to uncover the root cause of your symptoms?  Do they offer the highest level of functional tests in addition to standard blood tests? Do they do mostly energetic testing?  Will they review lab tests from your Medical Doctor? How do they decide what tests may be necessary for you?

6. Do they incorporate evidence based information and research into their treatment plans? 

The body of research on naturopathic medicine is growing every single day.  How does your Naturopathic Doctor stay up to date on research in their practice?  Do they incorporate both modern research and traditional knowledge into their treatment plans?  Patients are often surprised by the amount of research we can provide on the treatments we are suggesting for their care!

7. Will they work integratively together with your current health care team?

Integrative Medicine is choosing the best of all forms of medicine with the sole purpose of improving patient outcomes.  ~ Dr. Lisa

I think the medicine of the future will be more patient-centered, with all different types of health care providers working together to improve the health of individuals and their families.  I love working with Medical Doctors, physiotherapists, psychotherapists, nurse practitioners, chiropractors, osteopaths, massage therapists, and many other health professionals.  I truly believe this approach benefits everyone, most importantly my patients.

8. What types of therapies do they use in their practice?

Naturopathic Doctors are trained in a number of different therapies, from acupuncture to herbal medicine, nutritional supplementation and homeopathy.  What therapies does your Naturopath use, and why?  Personally I don’t use a lot of homeopathy in my practice because there isn’t a vast body of research supporting its use.  I focus on the research based treatments of nutritional and botanical medicines.  Discuss what your Naturopath is using and see if it resonates with what you’re looking for.

9. How much experience does the Naturopathic Doctor have?

There are many more important considerations than the number of years a doctor has been in practice, but it is something to discuss when meeting a Naturopath for the first time.  You don’t necessarily want to be someone’s first patient with your health concern.

10. Do you trust them, feel listened to, and comfortable with them?

In my mind, this is one of the most important considerations.  Ideally you are building a long term relationship with your Naturopathic Doctor.  Consider the so-called “soft traits” like personality, approachability, empathy and trust when deciding on your Naturopath.  This can be the make or break factor in selecting your ND, and I encourage you to trust your gut.

To make things easy for you, I’ve made a pdf with all these suggestions.  Bring it along when meeting your Naturopathic Doctor for the first time.  Most NDs offer a free 10-15 minute meet and greet appointment – I highly recommend taking them up on this.  Take the time to choose the best ND for you, and you will benefit immensely from the investment!

How to Select an ND

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

 

Laryngitis in Mermaids: Top Five Tips

There is no more famous case of laryngitis than that of the Little Mermaid. While her voice was lost due to an unfortunate deal with an evil sea witch, mermaids must be mindful of maintaining their voices lest they lose the ability to lure unsuspecting sailors to their destiny in the sea.

This article gives my top five tips for treating and preventing laryngitis in mermaids, mermen and sirens. Don’t let your lost voice be the loss of your allure.

  1. Increase Vitamin C

Vitamin C can help merfolk boost their immune system and overcome the inflammation of laryngitis. Sea vegetables, like dulse or kelp, contain about 20mg of vitamin C per tablespoon. So up your seaweed intake, or consider getting a vitamin C supplement – it is a water soluble supplement so watch that it doesn’t dissolve in the sea.

  1. Sage Tea

Sage (Salvia officinalis) is a land plant that is most often associated with Thanksgiving turkey dinners. However, it can be used by humans and mermaids alike to calm a sore throat and heal laryngitis. Sage has astringent, antiseptic and antibacterial properties that make it ideal for laryngitis.

Sage is most commonly used as a tea – brew 1-2 tsp in boiling water and drink warm (2-3 cups per day). You can also add honey if available in your neck of the sea. Don’t use sage if you are breastfeeding merbabies, as it can reduce milk supply.

  1. Licorice Reduction

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) is the root from another land plant and has anti-inflammatory and soothing properties. My favourite way of using licorice is as a reduction. Simple to prepare, and delicious, licorice reduction is safe for meradults and merchildren.

To make the reduction boil 8 tbsp of licorice root in 6 cups of water. Reduce heat and simmer until the mixture reduces to 1 ½ cups. Remove from heat and add 6 tbsp of honey. Cool, bottle and keep in a cool wet sack. Merchildren can have 1 tsp three times per day, and meradults can have 1 tbsp three times daily.

  1. Total Voice Rest

While the temptation for mermaids may be to sing, total voice rest is recommended for any merfolk suffering with laryngitis. Even whispering can prolong the inflammation in the laryngx and slow healing. So give your voice a rest for a few days and trust to your body language to get your message across.

  1. Don’t Trust Sea Witches

My final suggestion for preventing laryngitis is to avoid sea witches, and never trust one if you do encounter one. Sea witches are one of the most common causes of laryngitis in mermaids (although a rare cause in humans). Remember – an ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure – so leave the sea witches to their own devices and reduce your risk of developing laryngitis.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes by the supernatural community. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed monster doctor. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Frankenstein, or other primary care provider is recommended for any supernatural being suffering from a health problem.

 

10 Tips to Treat PMS Naturally

PMS (premenstrual syndrome) sucks.  That’s not medical jargon, that’s just the way it is.  Once a month, up to three-quarters of women experience physical or emotional discomfort or pain which can last up to 14 days (seriously.  14 days.)  Over 150 symptoms of PMS have been identified but the most common symptoms are:

Naturopathic treatment of PMS
There are over 150 symptoms associated with PMS
  • Decreased energy
  • Irritability, nervousness, anxiety and anger
  • Food cravings
  • Depression
  • Headache
  • Altered sex drive
  • Breast pain
  • Muscle aches and low back pain
  • Bloating
  • Diarrhea and/ or constipation
  • Swelling of the hands and feet
  • Trouble concentrating
  • Difficulty sleeping

What causes PMS?

Honestly, we don’t exactly know.  Researchers, clinicians, and people all over the internet debate this constantly.  We do know that it’s most likely a combination of imbalances in our hormones, neurotransmitters, lifestyle factors and our environment that leads to symptoms of PMS.

Balancing these diverse systems gives most women relief from their PMS symptoms. But it can take some time to determine what will work for you!  Don’t try to do this alone – an experienced naturopath or functional medicine doctor can guide you and give you the best chance for bidding farewell to your PMS.

Below you will find my TOP TEN natural treatments for PMS.  Start here.  Empower yourself with knowledge.  Then find the support you need.

10 Tips to Treat PMS Naturally

1. Exercise

Come on.  We know exercise is important, but did you know it can decrease your PMS symptoms?  Studies have shown again and again that women who engage in regular exercise have fewer PMS symptoms than women who do not.  And the exercise doesn’t need to be intense – it just needs to happen regularly (at least 3 times per week throughout the month).

Exercise can reducing estrogen levels, improve blood sugar levels and raise your feel-good endorphins!  And really, any exercise will do.  So run, dance, swim, cycle, hula hoop, yoga or pilates – it doesn’t matter.  Just do it!

2.    Cut the sugar

Women who experience PMS have been reported to eat whopping 275% more refined sugar than women who do not get PMS symptoms.  DAMN.

Refined sugars zap our magnesium levels, increase salt and water retention and create imbalances in our insulin levels.  All of these concerns have been linked to PMS symptoms.

Eliminating refined sugar and limiting simple carbohydrates (grains, pasta, baked goods) in favour of high fiber complex carbohydrates (fruits and vegetables, whole grains) lowers levels of estrogen, improves magnesium levels and can significantly improve symptoms of PMS.   So cut out the cookies, cakes, bagels and breads in favour of oatmeal, popcorn, quinoa, brown rice and other fiber rich foods.

 3.    Eliminate caffeine

I hate to be the bearer of bad news, but caffeine consumption is associated with more and worse PMS symptoms.  Caffeine is linked especially to breast tenderness, anxiety, irritability and difficulty sleeping during PMS.  The impact is even worse when combined with sugar (pay attention all you Frappuccino drinkers!).  Eliminating caffeine, or limiting it during the premenstrual phase can improve PMS symptoms for a lot of women.

4.    Take a probiotic

Probiotics are not just for digestive health!  Those little buggers living in our intestines are working hard for our health.  Healthy bacteria can decrease symptoms of PMS by increasing beta-glucuronidase enzyme activity and promoting estrogen excretion.

The best way to establish healthy bacteria levels in your gut is to take a probiotic supplement.  Try for one with both Lactobacillus acidophilus and Bifidobacterium bifidum.  Taken with food, probiotics are extremely safe and have no negative side effects (you can experience bloating if you take too much – 1 to 10 billion is usually a safe amount).

 5.    Consider Cal-Mag

1k-7649 spinachEstrogen and calcium are BFFs in our bodies.  Estrogen is involved in the absorption, metabolism and utilization of calcium in our bodies (this is why we are more prone to osteoporosis as we age – we’re learning so much today!)  And studies have found that both mood and physical symptoms of PMS are improved with daily calcium supplementation

Magnesium deficiency is a serious concern and most women with PMS are deficient in magnesium!  I’m going to say that again – MOST women with PMS are deficient in magnesium.   Magnesium deficiency causes fatigue, irritability, mental confusion, menstrual cramps, insomnia, muscle aches or pains and heart beat irregularities.

Dietary sources of calcium include dark green leafy vegetables, dairy (cheese, yogurt, milk), tofu, and almonds.  Dietary sources of magnesium are similar and include green leafy vegetables, tofu, legumes, nuts, seeds and whole grains.  Take to your ND about a Cal-Mag supplement, and take it in the evening away from other medications and supplements.

6.    Bring the B vitamins

It is hard to keep track of the hundreds of different things B vitamins do!  One of the most important is the detoxification of hormones through our liver.  If you don’t have enough B vitamins, your body is going to be dealing with those hormones a lot longer than you want to be.

Vitamin B6 is also a superstar when it comes to treating PMS.  Necessary for the production of two neurotransmitters – serotonin and dopamine (read all about them in my article on hormones for happiness!), vitamin B6 can seriously ease symptoms of PMS such as low energy, irritability and mood swings.

As if that wasn’t enough, B6 is also involved in transfer of magnesium into cells – without B6 magnesium wouldn’t be able to enter cells.  This is another reason why B vitamins, and especially B6 are so important in the relief of PMS symptoms.

7.    Dong Quai

Dong Quai (Angelica sinensis) is a traditional Chinese herb with thousands of years of use for imbalances in women’s hormones.  It has been used for menopause, painful menstruation, no menstruation and as a uterine tonic.  Dong quai has phytoestrogenic properties and I recommend it for women who experience PMS symptoms in addition to painful menstruation.

Dong quai is usually used from ovulation (day 14) until menstruation begins.  If you are also experiencing painful periods, continue it until your period stops.

 8.    Chaste tree

The SINGLE most important herb in the treatment of PMS, chaste tree (Vitex agnus castus) has been a life-changer for many women in my practice.

The effects of chaste tree appear to be due to the impact it has on the hypothalamus and pituitary – the starting point for hormone production in the body.  As a result, chaste tree is able to normalize the production of many hormones, for instance, reducing prolactin levels and normalizing the estrogen to progesterone ratio.

Chaste tree is best taken daily throughout the menstrual cycle.  Studies have found it to be useful for almost all symptoms associated with PMS including irritability, mood swings, anger, anxiety, headache, and breast tenderness.

9.    Licorice

Licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) is an amazing herb – one of the most powerful we use.  It has been used in both Western and Eastern herbal medicine for thousands of years for a wide variety of ailments.  It also has impressive modern scientific research to back up its historical uses.

 Licorice is useful in the treatment of premenstrual syndrome because it lowers estrogen levels while simultaneously raising progesterone levels.  Licorice also blocks the hormone aldosterone, decreasing water retention.

Licorice is usually taken from ovulation (day 14) until your period starts.  It should not be used if you have a history of kidney disease or high blood pressure.  You should be under the care of a Naturopathic Doctor while taking licorice.

10. See a Naturopathic Doctor

Obviously I think this is the best thing you can do to help manage your PMS symptoms.  Naturopathic Doctors are experts in correcting the underlying imbalances that lead to PMS symptoms.  Your unique set of symptoms will give an experienced ND a lot of information that can be used to individualize a treatment plan just for you.  NDs also can order comprehensive hormone panels that will identify imbalances in cortisol, estrogen, progesterone or testosterone that may be contributing to your symptoms.  You can find a licensed Naturopathic Doctor in your area by visiting the national association websites – CAND in Canada and AANP in the United States.  And of course, you can contact me if you’d like us to work together.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

DUTCH test, hormone testing,hormone test, women's hormones, hormone health

DUTCH: Gold Standard in Hormone Testing

In my work with women’s health and hormones, one of the biggest areas of debate is hormone testing. Women are confused about when and how to test their hormones, and if I’m honest, a lot of doctors are confused as well. Which is leaving women under-diagnosed and under-treated for their very real (and very annoying) hormone imbalances.

But no more. Science has come a long way and right now we have the ability to test for hormones in ways that we never have been able to before. And women everywhere can benefit. So if you’ve ever wondered, “Do I have a hormone imbalance?”, now we can easily answer that question.

The DUTCH Test

Hormone testing with the DUTCH testDUTCH is an acronym that stands for Dried Urine Test for Comprehensive Hormones. It is a simple, but sophisticated test that looks not just at your hormones, but how your body processes and metabolizes them.

The DUTCH test looks not just at your reproductive hormones (although it does look at those quite thoroughly), but it also looks at your stress hormones, your androgens (male pattern hormones), your melatonin and the new DUTCH test also looks at organic acids – markers for mood and nutritional balance in the body.

8 Reasons the DUTCH Test is the Gold Standard for Hormone Testing

  1. Simple collection

Nothing is easier than peeing on a piece of filter paper. (Ok… some people might get a little pee on themselves, but still… is that the worst thing that can happen to you today?)

  1. In depth hormone levels

If you have a question about your hormones, the answer is likely to be found in the DUTCH test. While your Naturopathic Doctor may still recommend blood testing for hormones like thyroid hormone, FSH or LH, just about every other hormone is covered in the DUTCH test.

  1. Metabolism matters

Hands down, the reason the DUTCH test is the best, is that it measures metabolites. The absolute level of your hormones matter – but what can matter more is what your body does with those hormones. This is metabolism – does your body turn testosterone into nasty acne-promoting 5a-DHT?? Does your body turn estradiol into DNA damaging 4-OH estrone? Are you healthfully metabolizing and eliminating estrogen from your body? The DUTCH test can tell you.

  1. It’s all about those curves

Not every hormone has stable levels over the entire day. In particular, our primary stress hormone, cortisol, and its metabolite cortisone, have a curve that changes over the course of the day. Blood tests only give us a single snapshot of your cortisol levels, but the dried urine test gives us not only the total levels of cortisol and cortisone, but also the curve – how those levels change over the day. This is some VALUABLE information for people who are struggling with stress, fatigue, anxiety, decreased libido, trouble sleeping and insomnia.

  1. Balanced estrogen

Estrogen is one of the most important hormones in our bodies, and it has so many benefits for our health, but it can also have negative impacts if it is not in balance.

Typical hormone testing for estrogen looks just at estradiol, the dominant estrogen in the body. But that only tells us such a small bit of information. If we want to balance our estrogen, and prevent complications of estrogen dominance, then we want to understand how our body copes with our burden of estrogen. What metabolism pathways does our body use? Are those the best pathways?

If you are considering bioidentical hormones (BHRT) for perimenopause, or menopause symptoms, then the DUTCH test is highly recommended at the initial visit to understand how you will metabolize the hormones.

  1. Androgens and acne and hair health

In my work with women, no one condition is more loathed or baffling than acne. WTF, am I right ladies? How did we reach our 30s and still have to deal with acne?? Often it’s an issue of androgen metabolism. But typical hormone testing just looks at the amount of testosterone being made, and not what your body is doing with it. If your body is sending more testosterone towards the DHT metabolites, you will have more acne and possibly hair loss (and chin/ upper lip hair growth!) The DUTCH test will tell you if this is happening – and then we can talk about what to do about it!

  1. Melatonin

If you are having difficulty sleeping, knowing your melatonin levels is amazing information to have. But not only those with insomnia or sleep challenges should know their melatonin levels. Melatonin is also a powerful antioxidant in our bodies, and optimal levels of melatonin have been found to reduce the incidence of hormonal cancers (including breast cancer). No other hormone test looks at melatonin, but the DUTCH test does.

  1. Organic acids

Natural treatments and testing for depression and anxietyA new addition in 2018 to the DUTCH test is the 6 OAT (organic acid tests). I’m so excited for this new information!

Three new markers for neurotransmitters – to help us understand your mood. If you struggle with depression, anxiety or insomnia, this information can be very significant. If you have tried antidepressants without benefit, your organic acid markers for specific neurotransmitters, like serotonin, may tell you why.

Additionally there are three new markers for nutritional levels – looking at your B6 and B12 metabolism as well as your glutathione status. If you are concerned about weight gain or inflammation as part of your hormone imbalance, now we may be able to identify why.

The 1 Reason I don’t love DUTCH Testing

  1. The test results are ugly

I know. Such an aesthetic issue. But the test results are ugly – seriously. The results are clear. The information is valuable. But the results look a lot like a airplane dashboard, and some patients find this overwhelming. So take the time to talk through the results with your ND to understand what they mean for you.

Toronto, naturopath, doctor, naturopathic doctor, holistic, functional doctor

Next Steps

If you are interested in DUTCH testing, I suggest booking a 15 minute complimentary meet and greet to discuss the details. It is an amazing, useful, sophisticated test. But it’s not the right test for everyone. So let’s talk and see if it is the right test for you.

Dr. Lisa

Further Reading

https://dutchtest.com

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/05/08/dutch-hormone-test.aspx

 

WTF is MTHFR?

The world of genetics is confusing AF.  But trust me, you will be hearing more and more about genetics in the coming years.  In 2003 researchers completed The Human Genome Project, a many year endeavour to sequence the human genome and understand what our genes can tell us about our health.  And one of the most important genes identified was MTHFR.

MTHFR

MTHFR is the acronym for the gene that makes methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. This is an essential step in the methylation pathway – a complex pathway that results in the production of neurotransmitters (mental health), glutathione (liver, inflammation and antioxidant health), and processing of estrogen and testosterone (hormone health). Methylation has been considered by many to be the most important enzyme function in the human body.

MTHFR Polymorphisms

Somewhere between 30-50% (perhaps more) people carry a mutation (also called a single nucleotide polymorphism – or SNP) in the MTHFR gene, with an estimated 14-20% of people having a more severe mutation. First identified by the Human Genome Project, researchers noted that people with the MTHFR mutation were more likely to develop certain diseases, including ADHD, autism, Alzheimer’s, atherosclerosis and autoimmune disorders.

Autism Alzheimer’s ADHD Atherosclerosis Miscarriages Fibromyalgia
Deep vein thrombosis Neural tube defects Gluten intolerance Pernicious anemia Schizophrenia Chronic fatigue syndrome
Post-menopausal depression Chemical sensitivities Parkinson’s Irritable bowel syndrome Pre-eclampsia Stroke
Spina bifida Bipolar disorder Male infertility Vascular dementia Blood clots Congenital heart defects
Gastric cancer Migraines with aura Low HDL cholesterol Epilepsy Atherosclerosis Oral clefts
Type I Diabetes Cervical dysplasia Glaucoma Prostate cancer Multiple sclerosis Essential hypertension
Thyroid cancer Premature death Heart murmurs Placental abruption Myocardial infarction Tongue tie
Asthma Bladder cancer Low testosterone Heavy metal toxicity
Conditions Associated with MTHFR Polymorphisms

It is important to remember that just because you have inherited a gene (thanks mom and dad), does not mean you will develop one of these health conditions. There are many factors (diet, lifestyle, nutritional status, environment) that contribute to gene expression.

Your genes are not your destiny, but they are your tendency

MTHFR C667T and MTHFR A1298C

Two main MTHFR mutations have been identified and are the focus of most research.

Mutations are inherited from our parents, and as such we have two copies of each gene. A mutation on either of these genes can be heterozygous (+/-) – meaning only one copy is abnormal – or homozygous (+/+), meaning both inherited copies is mutated. Homozygous mutations are more likely to cause health problems. And having a homozygous mutation in both MTHFR C667T and MTHFR A1298C is considered to be the most problematic.

The Consequences of MTHFR Mutations

The importance of the methylation cycle, impacted by MTHFR mutations, can not be understated. Some of the consequences of altered MTHFR function include:

  • Decreased methylationMTHFR, naturopath, nutrigenomics
  • Increased heavy metal toxicity (iron, copper, lead, mercury)
  • Low iron (often secondary to elevated copper)
  • Increased homocysteine leading to vascular inflammation (cardiovascular disease, increased blood pressure, increased risk of vascular dementia)
  • Poor conversion of homocysteine to glutathione (increased stress, fatigue, toxin build up, cellular stress)
  • Poor conversion of homocysteine to methionine (increased atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, anemia, inflammation)
  • Decreased production of SAMe and decreased serotonin levels (depression)

Nutrigenomics for MTHFR

One of the main reasons I became interested in genetic medicine, is the ability of nutrients, diet and lifestyle to strongly influence the function of our genes.  This field of study is known as nutrigenomics. 

When we know what our genetic tendencies are, we can alter and optimize them through dietary and supplemental choices. It’s an empowering way to look at our bodies.

In order to optimize MTHFR function, there are some things that need to be avoided:

  1. Synthetic folic acid – further slows the MTHFR function
  2. Cyanocobalamin – a form of vitamin B12 that slows methylation
  3. Birth control pills – block the uptake of folate in the gut
  4. Methotrexate – another medication that blocks folate uptake
  5. Proton pump inhibitors – a medication for heartburn that alters stomach acid levels and decreases vitamin B12 absorption
  6. Processed grains – contain synthetic folic acid
  7. Mercury amalgams and heavy metals – can lead to greater heavy metal toxicity due to poor metal clearance

Individuals who have MTHFR polymorphisms will often thrive with appropriate nutritional support. Supplements that can help to improve methylation are the cornerstone of MTHFR therapy.

Supplemental Support for MTHFR

Folate – natural folate, from leafy green plants (foliage – that’s how folate got its name!) and natural supplements will help to improve methylation. Especially important during the months prior to pregnancy, women of reproductive age with MTHFR mutations should be taking folate regularly.

Vitamin B6 – an essential cofactor in the methylation pathway, vitamin B6 helps to ensure folate works properly.

Vitamin B12 – vitamin B12 is a methyl donor – it contributes a methyl group to the methylation pathway, allowing it to function at optimal capacity. B12 should be taken in the methylcobalamin or hydroxycobalamin form, and never in the cyanocobalamin form.

Treatments for MTHFRTMG (Trimethylglycine or Betaine) – another methyl donor, providing three methyl groups to the methylation cycle, this nutrient is commonly deficient in people with MTHFR. Stress, infections, inflammation and high levels of heavy metals will all increase the demand for THM. In a healthy body, plenty is made, but it is also available as a supplement and in foods such as broccoli, beets and other vegetables. TMG is especially useful for people with depressive symptoms as it increases the production of SAMe.

SAMe – a consequence of poor MTHFR function is low levels of SAMe. Essential for the production of serotonin, low SAMe can be associated strongly with depression. SAMe acts as a methyl donor in the body, and is made in the body through methylation processes. Supplementation is available although often levels improve with supplementation of methyl donors, B12 and folate.

NAC (N-Acetyl Cysteine) – a direct precursor to the production of glutathione. NAC can be used to support detoxification and decrease oxidative damage in people with MTHFR mutations.

Confused? 

You’re not alone!  The study of genetics, and the influence of our genes on our health, is some pretty deep, dark science stuff!  But it’s also incredibly informative, and empowering.  And if you’ve ever wondered how your genes are impacting your health, you should consider genetic testing and working with a Naturopathic Doctor,  Geneticist or Functional Medicine Doctor who can help you understand your genetic tendencies, and realize your optimal health potential.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Is my IBS actually SIBO?

Gas, bloating, abdominal pain, diarrhea, constipation – present to your medical doctor with any of these symptoms and you’ll likely get a diagnosis of IBS – irritable bowel syndrome. But what if it’s more than that? What if rather than having a cranky digestive tract you actually have a bacterial imbalance in your small intestines? What if you have SIBO?

What is SIBO?

SIBO stands for small intestine bacterial overgrowth, a condition where abnormally large numbers of bacteria (both the good and bad kind) are present in the small intestine. SIBO is a very common cause of IBS-like symptoms – studies have shown SIBO to be involved in between 50-84% of IBS cases. More importantly, when treated for SIBO, a 75% reduction in IBS symptoms has been found. For people who have been suffering for years (or decades!) with IBS symptoms, a proper diagnosis of SIBO can be life-changing.

Symptoms

While most people who experience digestive issues are given a diagnosis of IBS, the symptoms of SIBO are so similar that I recommend every patient who has been told they have IBS be tested for SIBO. Symptoms of IBS include:

  • Gas and bloating (often causing visible distention of the abdomen)
  • Flatulence (farting) and belching (burping)
  • Abdominal pain, cramping or general discomfort
  • Constipation or diarrhea (or both!)
  • Heartburn
  • Nausea
  • Nutrient deficiencies (due to malabsorption – vitamin D, B12, K)

The bacterial overgrowth in SIBO can cause significant gas and bloating – if you are experiencing severe gas or bloating, SIBO testing should be considered. With healthy normal bacteria levels, a single ounce of milk will cause about 50cc of gas to be created. With SIBO, that same amount of milk will cause up to 5000cc of gas to be created! And that gas has to go somewhere – filling the intestines and causing pain, or being released as gas and burping.

Many conditions may also be associated with SIBO, with the additional symptoms of those conditions being present. Some of those conditions include:

  • Hypothyroidism
  • Gallstones
  • Crohn’s disease and inflammatory bowel disease
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Diverticulitis/ diverticulosis
  • Fibromyalgia
  • Chronic pancreatitis
  • Lactose intolerance
  • Celiac disease
  • Restless leg syndrome
  • Rosacea
  • Diabetes

What Causes SIBO?

In our bodies we support a population of around 300 trillion bacteria. Living mostly on our skin and in our large intestine, these bacteria are powerful supporters of healthy human function. Producing vitamins like vitamin K and B12, producing neurotransmitters like serotonin, and regulating the function of our immune system – these bacteria are essential for optimal health.

SIBO occurs when the bacteria that should be in our large intestine migrate upwards into our small intestine. There they produce gases and disrupt nutrient absorption, leading the symptoms often attributed to IBS.

There are some specific triggers that can lead to this movement of bacteria into the small intestine. Some of those triggers include:

  • A stomach flu or food poisoning
  • Low stomach acid (or use of antacids)
  • Prior bowel surgery
  • Use of antibiotics (especially multiple courses)
  • Moderate or high alcohol consumption (greater than one drink per day for women or two drinks per day for men)
  • Use of birth control pills

One of the organisms involved in SIBO, Methanobrevivacter smithii has been linked to obesity in humans

Clues to SIBO

There are some clues that your IBS may in fact be SIBO. If you answer “yes” to any of these questions, you should invest in SIBO testing now.

  1. Did your digestive symptoms start, or become worse, after a bout of the stomach flu?
  2. Have you experienced short term improvement in your symptoms after taking an antibiotic?
  3. Do your symptoms get worse when taking a probiotic or prebiotic supplement?
  4. Does eating a high fiber diet worsen constipation or IBS symptoms?
  5. Do you have celiac disease that has not sufficiently improved following a gluten-free diet?
  6. Have you been diagnosed with an iron deficiency, despite having an iron rich diet?
  7. Do you have IBS symptoms and take antacids more than once per month (including Tums, Rolaids, Nexxium or Prilosec)?
  8. Do you experience gas that has a strong “rotten-egg” odour?

Diagnosis

The overgrowth of bacteria seen in SIBO can be identified through a breath test. The bacteria produce high amounts of hydrogen, hydrogen sulfide, or methane gas. These gases are not produced by human cells, but only through the action of bacteria on carbohydrates in our intestines.

The most common (and effective) test for SIBO is a combined hydrogen/methane breath test. This test is readily available from your Naturopathic Doctor. This is the only test for SIBO – stool tests will not help to diagnose SIBO.

Next steps

If you suspect you may have SIBO, you should see your Naturopath for appropriate testing. Once a diagnosis has been made you can embark on a treatment plan that may finally resolve your symptoms and get you back on the path to optimal health.

The treatment of SIBO is multifaceted and individualized for each person. Some of the key areas we focus on are supporting small intestine motility, optimizing digestive acids and enzymes, healing the lining of the digestive tract, eradicating biofilm and promoting healthy bacterial balance in the large intestine. Addressing the lifestyle and diet for long term prevention of recurrence is also important. Discontinuing medications, like antacids and proton pump inhibitors that encourage SIBO must also be considered.

You don’t have to continue to suffer. Digestive health is essential for optimal health. Get yourself tested, and get on the path to wellness today.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

MTHFR in Mental Health

MTHFR is an essential component of human health, one that you may not have heard of, but you likely will be hearing more about it in the future.

MTHFR is an acronym for a gene – methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. This gene produces an enzyme essential for human health – methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHF). It has been estimated that somewhere between 30-85% of humans carry a mutation, or SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) in this gene. This can lead to minimal changes in the function of this gene, or significant changes that can drastically impact health. Our current best guess is that between 6-14% of caucasians, 2% of African descent, and up to 21% of Hispanics have a severe mutation.

MTHFR in Mental Health

One of the essential functions of MTHFR is to produce neurotransmitters. Individuals with MTHFR mutations may be more at risk of developing one of the many mental health conditions associated with MTHFR:

  • depression
  • bipolar disorder
  • attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • schizophrenia
  • autism
  • addiction
  • anxiety

The neurotransmitters produced during the MTHFR cycle, in particular serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine and melatonin, have important mood stabilizing effects. The decreased function of the MTHFR cycle in people with a MTHFR mutation can lead to lower levels of these neurotransmitters, increasing the risk of developing a mental health condition.

MTHFR and Anti-Depressants

In addition to increasing the odds of developing a mental health condition, an MTHFR defect can also alter the ability of a person to respond to antidepressant medications. A higher rate of non-responsiveness and/or adverse effects has been found in people with an MTHFR mutation.

MTHFR Testing

If you suspect you may have an MTHFR defect the only way to know for sure is to do a genetic test that will identify if you have a mutation in this important gene at one of two locations – known as C667T or A1298C. If you have a single mutation in one location (inherited from one parent) you have a “heterozygous” mutation – if you have two mutations in one location (inherited from both parents) then you have a “homozygous” mutation, which is generally more severe. If you have two mutations in both locations then you have a “compound homozygous” mutation, the most severe.

What to do about MTHFR

The most important thing to do about MTHFR is to support the normal function of this enzyme pathway with essential nutrients. This pathway (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) produces folate as one of it’s primary actions. Folate, vitamin B9, can be taken as a supplement and reduce the negative effects seen with MTHFR mutations. Avoiding things that can interfere with folate is also important – digestive diseases, poor diet, alcohol consumption and some medications (include the birth control pill). Additionally, avoiding synthetic folic acid, found mostly in processed foods (like bread, crackers and cereals), is also important as the folic acid can slow down the MTHFR cycle further.

In addition to taking a folate supplement, focusing on a healthy diet is essential for managing MTHFR. Folate comes from foliage – so eating your leafy greens, broccoli and beans can provide folate in your daily diet.

Treating MTHFR can be complex. Working with a qualified practitioner, well-versed in MTHFR is essential to improve your health and support your mind and body.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Hormone Harmony in PMS

Welcome to the first installment of the “Hormone Harmony” series. In this series I’ll be exploring some of the most common states of female hormone imbalance, how your hormones can explain your symptoms, and some simple hormone hacks to help bring your body back into a state of hormone harmony.

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

While a definition of PMS may not be necessary if you are reading this (it’s likely you’ve had first hand experience), I will try to give one that encompasses exactly what PMS is.

PMS is a recurrent set of physical and/or behavioural symptoms that occurs 7-14 days before a period and negatively impacts some aspect of a woman’s life

There have been over 150 (seriously!) symptoms of PMS identified. Some of the most common include:

  • Low energy
  • Mood changes – anger, crying, irritability, anxiety, depression, bitchiness
  • Food cravings
  • Headache
  • Low sex drive
  • Breast tenderness
  • Digestive upset – constipation, bloating, diarrhea, gas
  • Difficulty sleeping

Unfortunately we don’t really know what causes some women to experience PMS more than other women. But hormone imbalances are a common proposed cause, and in my practice I see balancing hormones as the most important means of decreasing symptoms of PMS.

Hormone Imbalances in PMS

The relationship between estrogen and progesterone is one of the most important hormone balances in a woman’s body. Imbalance in estrogen and progesterone levels is thought to be the primary cause of PMS.

Estrogen is produced throughout the month by the ovaries, adrenal glands and fat cells. It main action is growth – growth of breast tissue in puberty, and growth of the endometrial lining in the uterus during menstrual cycles.

Progesterone is produced during the second half of the menstrual cycle – after ovulation – by the ovaries.  Progesterone helps to balance the effects of estrogen and prepare the uterus for a possible pregnancy.

A too high estrogen level, or a too low progesterone level is thought to be the most likely cause of PMS symptoms in most women. This state, commonly called “estrogen dominance” is the most common hormone imbalance in women between the ages of 15 and 50. Estrogen dominance is becoming more common in North America due to increasing exposure to xenoestrogens (chemicals in our environment that mimic estrogen), high rates of obesity, decreased ability of our livers to detoxify and overwhelming amounts of stress.

The important thing to remember with PMS and hormone balance is that it is the relationship and balance of estrogen and progesterone that leads to symptoms. You may have normal levels of estrogen, but if your progesterone is low you will still experience symptoms. Progesterone levels are low in women who do not ovulate, and in those with significant stress (your body will convert progesterone into cortisol, leaving you deficient in much-needed progesterone).

Hormone Hacks for PMS

If you are a woman experiencing PMS, taking charge of your hormones and getting them into balance can make a huge difference in your quality of life. Below are some simple Hormone Hacks to get you started.

  1. Follow the PMS diet

There have been some significant findings in the diets of women who suffer from significant PMS. Compared to women who do not have PMS they eat 275% more sugar, 79% more dairy and 62% more refined carbohydrates. Avoiding these foods – and instead choosing fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy proteins – can diminish PMS symptoms significantly and promote healthy hormone balance.

  1. Cut the caffeine

No one wants to hear it, but drinking caffeine-containing beverages increases the severity of PMS. And those effects are worsened if you add sugar to your tea or coffee. So cut back, or cut it out all together if you want to decrease your PMS.

  1. Exercise

Women who exercise regularly have less PMS. Multiple studies have found this to be true, and the more frequently you exercise the better the boost. Exercise is known to decrease estrogen levels – so get out there and get moving.

  1. Get your nutrients in

Deficiencies in many nutrients have been found in women with PMS. Some notable ones include magnesium, vitamin B6, and zinc. All of these nutrients can be found in nuts and seeds – also known to be excellent sources of vegan protein.

  1. Get tested

Understanding your hormone imbalances can be incredibly valuable to managing symptoms like PMS. Testing your hormone levels will give you a clear understanding of what is happening in your body during a specific phase of your menstrual period. For PMS we test hormone levels (estrogen, progesterone and prolactin) about 7 days before your expected period.

  1. Herbal hormone balancers

There are some phenomenal hormone balancers in the world of herbal medicine. Vitex agnus-castus (also known as chaste berry) can improve progesterone levels, helping to balance estrogen dominance. Phytoestrogens, like those found in black cohosh, soy and flaxseeds, can also help to normalize estrogen levels by decreasing the action of our body’s own estrogen in favour of the milder estrogen signal from plant estrogens.

  1. Bioidentical progesterone

When all else fails in hormone balancing for PMS, your naturopathic doctor can prescribe low dose bioidentical progesterone in a cream that you can apply during the final weeks of your menstrual cycle. This will be helpful if your progesterone levels are low, or if your estrogen levels are high. Be sure your ND is qualified to prescribe bioidentical hormones, as additional training is required.

Don’t suffer with hormone imbalances like PMS.  You can achieve hormone harmony, and working with a Naturopathic Doctor can get you there.  Book an appointment, or a meet and greet now to find your personal balance.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.           

Female Hair Loss: Lab Testing

My expertise in treating hair loss in women started with a personal experience of hair loss in my 20s. After being dismissed by my Medical Doctor who assured me it was “totally normal” I persisted in understanding why a healthy woman in her 20s would start losing hair.

Laboratory Testing for Female Hair Loss

As I discuss in my article, Getting to the Root of Female Hair Loss, treating hair loss can only be effective if you understand the root cause – why is a woman losing hair? Through laboratory testing an answer can often be found.

When I am working with women with hair loss I generally advocate for a tiered approach to lab testing for hair loss – starting with the most likely causes and progressing to the more complex.

For myself, the issue was an iron deficiency. By correcting that iron deficiency I was able to resolve my hair loss in under a year and it hasn’t recurred since.

Use the checklist below with your Medical Doctor or Naturopathic Doctor to determine the root cause of your hair loss. And if you’re ready to work with someone experienced in hair loss in women, get in touch and book an appointment today.

Female Hair Loss – Printable PDF

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Natural Treatments for Tinnitus

Tinnitus impacts nearly 400 000 Canadians and can severely impact the quality of life. Tinnitus is defined as the perception of sound without an external source. It may be described as a hissing, ringing, or whooshing noise.   Many individuals diagnosed with tinnitus are told that the condition is chronic, will never improve, and they will just have to learn to live with it.

While Naturopathic Medicine can not guarantee a successful treatment of tinnitus, there may be hope in some of the integrative treatments available.

Cause of Tinnitus

The exact underlying cause of tinnitus is not known. It can be associated with noise trauma (explosions, loud noises), physical trauma, post-inflammation, anxiety and other conditions. In many cases an underlying cause is not identified.

The symptoms of tinnitus may be processed by different parts of the brain than typical auditory pathways. The amygdala and limbic system – parts of the brain responsible for memory and emotions – seem to play a significant role in tinnitus.

Diagnosis of Tinnitus

Diagnosis of tinnitus is generally clinical – the presence of a reported noise with no external source. An audiologist assessment should also be performed. A contrast MRI is also a useful tool and can identify possible underlying causes of tinnitus. Blood work for autoimmune antibodies, vitamin B12, inflammatory markers (ESR), cholesterol levels, blood sugar levels, thyroid-stimulating hormone and comprehensive hormone testing can also provide useful information in identifying metabolic, hormonal, or autoimmune cases of tinnitus. Questionnaires can also be valuable in tracking progress with integrative treatment options.

Conventional Treatment Options

There are several different treatment options offered by qualified audiologists. Many involve sound therapy, masking, hearing aids or tinnitus retraining devices. A referral to an experienced audiologist is necessary for these treatments.

Correcting underlying causes of tinnitus will be helpful in a patient-by-patient basis. If the tinnitus is caused by a hormonal imbalance, such as thyroid disease, correcting the thyroid dysfunction can lead to resolution of symptoms. Antidepressants (impacting serotonin and/or dopamine) and GABA-enhancing medications have also been used in some individuals with success.

Naturopathic Treatment Options

While no guarantee of success exists in the treatment of tinnitus, the lack of conventional treatment options leads many people to seek out natural and integrative therapies. The majority of these options are safe and may provide some degree of relief to people suffering with tinnitus. Working with a knowledgeable Naturopathic Doctor is advised as these treatments may have side effects or interactions with other medications.

Ginkgo biloba

One of the most commonly sold botanical medicines worldwide, ginkgo is used to increase blood flow to the head and treat symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease, dementia and vascular tinnitus. ginkgo has antioxidant, neuroprotective and platelet-inhibiting effects. Studies suggest that ginkgo may have a positive impact on patients with tinnitus, by increasing blood flow to the ear and may be especially useful in the elderly. The use of ginkgo may be limited by its interactions with medications, especially blood thinners, aspirin and seizure medications.

Zinc

Zinc is an essential mineral with significant actions in the central nervous system, including the hearing pathway, as well as in hormone production, enzyme function, and synthesis of DNA and RNA. Studies have suggested that zinc deficiency impacts between 2-69% of individuals with tinnitus. Giving zinc to individuals with tinnitus is a low risk intervention, and measuring serum zinc levels may identify those in greatest need for supplementation.

Melatonin

Melatonin, a hormone produced by the pineal gland during the night, regulates sleep/ wake cycles and acts as an antioxidant. Some studies have found that supplementing melatonin may improve tinnitus, especially in individuals with sleep disturbances. Melatonin may also help in individuals with stress by balancing cortisol production, another hormone often involved in tinnitus.

Vitamin B12

An important nutrient, and common deficiency, there have been studies showing a relationship between vitamin B12 deficiency and abnormal function of the hearing pathway. For every individual experiencing tinnitus, vitamin B12 levels should be assessed and optimal levels should be achieved through dietary and supplemental means.

Garlic

The flavourful garlic bulb is useful for many cardiovascular conditions. It has cholesterol-lowering effects, lowers blood pressure and can decrease blood clot formation. It may be useful for tinnitus by improving blood flow to the inner ear. There are no current studies on the use of garlic for tinnitus, but the possible benefits are evident.

Pycnogenol

Preliminary research suggests that the antioxidant, pycnogenol (pine bark extract) can decrease symptoms of tinnitus after one month of use. It is suspected that it’s influence on inflammation and the cardiovascular system may lead to improvements in tinnitus.

Hormone Modulation

Hormonal imbalances have been identified in many individuals experiencing tinnitus, with imbalance in the hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis being most common. This HPA axis is involved in the stress response, with abnormal cortisol production being a common feature. One study found that individuals with tinnitus had a blunted cortisol response after stressful events. Identifying and correcting underlying hormonal imbalance can improve tinnitus in some people, especially those with stress.

Acupuncture

Several studies have demonstrated improvement in tinnitus symptoms with acupuncture treatment. Improvements with acupuncture have not been found in all studies, and improvements may be short lived (average of 100 hours in one study). Acupuncture is a very safe treatment, with limited side effects and no interactions with medications. Administered by a qualified naturopathic doctor or acupuncturist, it may be a valuable option for the treatment of tinnitus.

Taking an integrative approach, managing stress and balancing your hormones may help to improve the symptoms of tinnitus, and also improve the quality of life of people suffering with tinnitus. To learn more, speak to a qualified Naturopathic Doctor.

References:

The sound of stress: blunted cortisol reactivity to psychosocial stress in tinnitus sufferers. Hébert S, Lupien SJ. Neurosci. Lett. – January 10, 2007; 411 (2); 138-42

Diagnostic value and clinical significance of stress hormones in patients with tinnitus. Kim DK, Chung DY, Bae SC, Park KH, Yeo SW, Park SN. Eur Arch Otorhinolaryngol – November 1, 2014; 271 (11); 2915-21

Hormones and the auditory system: A review of physiology and pathophysiology Neuroscience, 2008-06-02, Volume 153, Issue 4, Pages 881-900, Copyright © 2008

Complementary and Integrative Treatments for tinnitus Gregory S. Smith MD, Massi Romanelli-Gobbi BM, Elizabeth Gray-Karagrigoriou Au.D and Gregory J. Artz MD  Otolaryngologic Clinics of North America, The, 2013-06-01, Volume 46, Issue 3, Pages 389-408

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.