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WTF Is Happening: Hormones in Your 40s

This event is for all those women who are wondering WTF is happening with my hormones?

As we move through our 40s our hormones enter into a “second puberty” – a time of significant upheaval in our previously balanced state.  And if you thought puberty was bad – try having kids and partners and jobs on top of it!

If you are curious if your hormones are contributing to your:

  • Mood changes, anxiety, depression, PMS or what we affectionately call “werewolfing”
  • Low libido (or high libido!  It happens!)
  • Acne, hair growth, or hair loss
  • Irregular periods, no periods, heavy periods, sometimes all of these, sometimes none of them
  • Breast changes
  • Insomnia or sleep changes
  • Or so many, many other issues

Then please join me at Oma Chiropractic on Thursday, May 31st as we drop some truth bombs on what REALLY IS HAPPENING during our 40s.

You can find more information on the Facebook Event page here:  https://www.facebook.com/events/161921597814032/ 

Hope to see you there!

PCOS and Mental Health

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is the most common hormone imbalance in women and yet very few people are talking about how significantly this imbalance is impacting women’s lives.

PCOS can impact any woman, at any age – from puberty to perimenopause, and in addition to the typical symptoms of irregular or absent periods, acne, facial hair growth and scalp hair loss, there can also be an increased incidence of mental health concerns.

PCOS and Depression

It has been my experience in practice that women with PCOS often have signs of depression – many of them due to the effects the symptoms of PCOS have on their body image. Researchers have found that nearly ¼ of women with PCOS have depression and they too suggest it may be linked to the “emotionally distressing” symptoms associated with PCOS, rather than the underlying hormone imbalance itself.

PCOS and Anxiety

Rates of anxiety are also higher in women with PCOS, with 11.5% of women in one study having both diagnoses (compared to an average 9% in the general female population).

Anxiety may be associated both with the physical symptoms of PCOS, but potentially may also stem from the hormone imbalances, such as low progesterone, that are common in PCOS. Progesterone is an anxiety-lowering hormone and low levels of progesterone occur when there is no ovulation – such as in PCOS.

PCOS and ADHD

Another interesting finding from the 2018 study on PCOS and mental health – women who have PCOS have an increased risk of having children who are diagnosed with ADHD (attention deficit hyperactivity disorder) or an autism spectrum disorder. The researchers suggest that it may be due to higher circulating androgens during development.

Support for PCOS and Mental Health

Focusing on whole body health, rather than just the visible symptoms of PCOS is important for all women with PCOS. While most women will want to focus on clearing acne and decreasing body weight, we must look at women as a complex entity of interlacing systems – ladies, we are all unicorns – we need to be treated individually and with attention to our specific wants and needs. Our mental and physical health are one and the same, and we should seek care from health care providers who recognize that.

Your Naturopathic Doctor can help you to put together a plan that focuses on your diet, lifestyle, obstacles to health, hormonal imbalances and mental and spiritual health.  Looking at your life and health as a whole, rather than individual symptoms to be managed, your ND works with you to achieve optimal health – in all areas of your life.

Select References

Thomas R Berni Christopher L Morgan Ellen R Berni D Aled Rees.  Polycystic ovary syndrome is associated with adverse mental health and neurodevelopment outcomes.  The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, jc.2017-02667

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Diagnosing PCOS

Polycystic ovarian syndrome is one of the most common conditions that I treat in my hormone balancing practice. It affects 1 out of every 10 women and shows up in many different ways – hair loss, facial hair growth, acne, difficulty losing weight, irregular menstrual periods or infertility. Because of the many different symptoms of PCOS, an accurate diagnosis is important.

The Rotterdam Criteria

In 2003 the Society for Human Reproduction and Embryology (ESHRE) and the American Society for Reproductive Medicine (ASRM) came up with a specific criteria for making a diagnosis of PCOS – The Rotterdam Criteria.  Diagnosis of PCOS requires that a woman meets two of three criteria:

  1. Infrequent or no ovulation (resulting in irregular or absent menstrual periods)
  2. Signs and symptoms or laboratory tests that show high androgen (male hormone) levels – these include acne, hair loss, facial hair growth, darkening of the skin at skin folds
  3. Cysts on the ovaries on ultrasound

For a diagnosis of PCOS it is also important to rule out other causes of these symptoms, such as a pituitary, thyroid or adrenal disease.

Clinical Evaluation

taking-notesThe first step in diagnosis of PCOS is a thorough evaluation with your medical or naturopathic doctor. Your doctor will ask a lot of questions. Be sure to share if you experience any of the following:

  1. Irregular periods – menstrual cycles that are longer than 35 days, infrequent periods or no periods at all can all be associated with anovulation and PCOS.  (Keep in mind: 1 in 5 women with PCOS still have regular periods, so having a regular period does not rule out PCOS)
  1. Acne – facial, chest, or back acne can be a sign of elevated androgens
  2. Hirsutism – abnormal growth of coarse hair in a male pattern (lip, chin, torso)
  3. Hair loss – elevated androgens is a major cause of head hair loss in women
  4. Oily hair or skin
  5. lump-sugar-549096_640Sugar cravings – a sign of insulin imbalance, one of the major hormonal imbalances in PCOS. Other symptoms include dizziness, lightheadedness or irritability (or “hangry”) if a meal is missed.
  6. Recurrent yeast infections – a sign of elevated blood sugar levels. Other symptoms include excess thirst and frequent urination.
  7. Overweight or difficulty losing weight – often a cause, and consequence, of the hormone imbalances in PCOS
  8. Darkening of the skin – especially at the back of the neck or in the skin folds at the underarms, under the breasts and between the thighs. This darkened skin is called acanthosis nigricans and is associated with elevated testosterone.
  9. Infertility – difficulty getting pregnant is often the driving factor for a diagnosis for PCOS
  10. Family history of PCOS or diabetes

Laboratory Testing

Laboratory testing is the second criteria for a PCOS diagnosis. Many different lab tests can be used to confirm a suspected PCOS diagnosis, and these tests may highlight the underlying hormonal imbalances that cause PCOS. If you are taking the birth control pill to suppress your PCOS symptoms these tests will not provide accurate information.

Luteinizing hormone (LH) – high – produced by the pituitary gland to stimulate ovulation, levels are often elevated because ovulation is not occurring

Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) – normal or low – typically assessed in relation to LH levels, some women with have a higher than normal LH:FSH ratio (greater than 1:1)

PCOS laboratory testingSerum testosterone (free and total testosterone) – high – 80% of women with PCOS have elevated levels of androgens. DHT levels may also be elevated

Progesterone – low – during the second half (luteal phase) of the menstrual cycle progesterone levels will be low due to the lack of ovulation

Estradiol – normal – typically in PCOS estrogen levels are normal or slightly elevated

Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG ) – low – if tested, levels may be low

Fasting blood glucose – high – women with abnormal blood sugar levels typically have higher body weight, have higher androgen levels and are more insulin resistance

HbA1C – high – a long term (3 month) measure of blood sugar stability

Anti-Mullerian hormone (AMH) – high – levels of AMH are often elevated in PCOS due to the lack of regular ovulation

DHEAS – high – half of women with PCOS will have elevated adrenal production of DHEAS

Prolactin – normal – elevated prolactin can cause symptoms similar to PCOS; if your prolactin levels are high a pituitary tumour must be ruled out.

Thyroid stimulating hormone – normal – should be measured to rule out other causes of menstrual irregularities

Cortisol – normal – should be measured to rule out Cushing’s syndrome

Additionally, a pelvic or transvaginal ultrasound may reveal multiple 2-6mm follicular (simple) cysts on the ovaries. Ovarian volume or area may also be increased.

Moving Beyond Diagnosis

PCOS DietAn appropriate diagnosis of PCOS is important for women seeking optimal hormone balance. But the diagnosis is only the beginning. Your naturopathic doctor can be your partner as you move beyond diagnosis towards understanding and hormone balance. Read the other articles in the PCOS Series by Dr. Lisa Watson: Understanding PCOS, The PCOS Diet (also available as an infographic), PCOS and Infertility, PCOS in Adolescence, PCOS and Pregnancy, Hormonal Balance in PCOS and Naturopathic Medicine for PCOS.

Dr. Watson is currently accepting new patients at both her Toronto clinics. Contact her for a complimentary meet and greet appointment, or book your initial consultation today. The best time to start balancing your hormones is now.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Pin this article for later: https://www.pinterest.com/pin/207165651589076259/

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PCOS & Berberine

While your medical doctor may not have heard of it, the functional and naturopathic medicine community is raving about berberine for polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). And if you haven’t heard about it – you are about to go to school on WHY berberine may be exactly the treatment you have been looking for.

What is Berberine?

Berberine is a compound (technically a quaternary ammonium salt – damn! science!) found in several plants – most notably barberry, Oregon grape and goldenseal.  It has been used as a medicine in Traditional Chinese Medicine for over 5000 years.

Berberine Improves Insulin Responsiveness

One of the key findings in many women with PCOS is a poor response to insulin. When the cells (including those of the ovaries) stop responding to insulin, energy goes down, weight gain goes up and many of the hormone imbalances associated with PCOS show up.

One of the most common prescription treatments for PCOS is metformin, a drug that improves insulin response. But studies have found that berberine is able to do this too – and maybe even a bit better than metformin!

Berberine stimulates cells to take up glucose, so blood sugar and insulin levels drop. This can result in ovulation for women with PCOS. One study also found that the women taking berberine lost more weight than the women on metformin. Win-win!

Berberine Lowers Testosterone

The elevated testosterone associated with PCOS is the one hormone imbalance most women want addressed quickly. Elevated testosterone leads to the acne, head hair loss, chin and upper lip hair growth that women despise. Studies have demonstrated that berberine can lower testosterone levels and speed the resolution of these symptoms.

Berberine Benefits Your Gut

Berberine is not just great for your ovaries, but it’s great for your gut too. Berberine has been used for generations to treat symptoms of gas, bloating, constipation and diarrhea. Now we understand that it does this by helping increase the production of short chain fatty acids and supporting the healthy bacteria (probiotics) in our guts. Healthy bacteria help us to eliminate estrogen – minimizing the potential for estrogen dominace – another common hormone imbalance in PCOS.

Berberine Loves Your Liver

Your liver is essential in hormone balance. Berberine has been found in studies to increase the production of sex hormone binding globulin (that’s a mouthful…) or SHBG that binds to testosterone and makes it unavailable for use in your body.

Berberine has also been found to lower liver enzymes in non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, a condition that is commonly found in women who are overweight and have PCOS.

Berberine Benefits Fertility

Whether you are trying to get pregnant or just balance your hormones, it is reassuring to know that berberine can improve ovulation and pregnancy rates in women with PCOS. In women with PCOS undergoing IVF procedures, those who took berberine (no matter whether they were normal weight or overweight) had higher pregnancy rates than women using metformin or a placebo.

Berberine Boosts Weight and Fat Loss

Not every woman with PCOS is overweight (I talk about that more in the PCOS Types article), but if you are even mildly overweight berberine can help you to shed some unwanted fat.

Berberine has been found in multiple studies to support weight loss and to help target fat loss from the midsection of the body. Berberine helps to lower the production of our hunger hormone, leptin – a hormone that stimulates our appetite. Women with PCOS and women who are overweight often have abnormal levels of leptin.

Building on Berberine

Berberine is an excellent option for many women with PCOS. It can be the cornerstone for PCOS treatment and help you to achieve your dreams of hormone harmony.

Discuss with your Naturopathic Doctor if berberine is the best bet for you.  It may be used in combination with other natural treatment options, diet and lifestyle changes to improve your health and hormones, naturally.

Select Resources

Toronto Naturopath, Dr. Lisa Watson discusses the use of berberine for PCOS - polycystic ovarian syndromeAn Y, Sun Z, Zhang Y, Liu B, Guan Y, Lu M. The use of berberine for women with polycystic ovary syndrome undergoing IVF treatment. Clin Endocrinol (Oxf). 2014 Mar;80(3):425-31

Wei W, Zhao H, Wang A, Sui M, Liang K, Deng H, Ma Y, Zhang Y, Zhang H, Guan Y. A clinical study on the short-term effect of berberine in comparison to metformin on the metabolic characteristics of women with polycystic ovary syndrome. Eur J Endocrinol. 2012 Jan;166(1):99-105.

Wu X, Yao J, et al. Berberine improves insulin resistance in granulosa cells in similar way to metformin. Fertility and sterility.2006; supplement S459-S460.

Yang J et al. Berberine improves insulin sensitivity by inhibiting fat store and adjusting adipokines profile in human preadipocytes and metabolic syndrome patients. Evid Based Complement Alternat Med. 2012

Zhao L et al. Berberine improves glucogenesis and lipid metabolism in nonalcoholic fatty liver disease. BMC Endocr Disord. 2017 Feb 28;17(1):13.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Men’s Quiz: Is My Testosterone Low?

My work in hormone balance isn’t just with women – men can experience symptoms of hormone imbalance with age as well.  Testosterone is about much more than libido – it is also essential for mood, energy, muscle strength, bone density and many, MANY other actions in the body.

We know that testosterone levels decline with age – with that decline starting as early as 30 years old.  Additionally it has been found that men today are making up to a quarter less testosterone than their grandfathers did.

If you suspect you may have low testosterone, take this quiz.  And if the results suggest you have low testosterone book an appointment to discuss further testing, lifestyle and treatment options.  There are options available, including bio-identical hormone replacement therapy.

 

ADAM – Androgen Deficiency in Aging Men

This symptom based questionnaire will help diagnose low testosterone levels in men. When used with laboratory testing a diagnosis of low testosterone, or andropause, can be made.

If you answered yes to questions 1 or 7, or at least three of the other questions you may have low testosterone levels. Be sure to discuss the results of this quiz with your Naturopathic Doctor, don’t delay – the effects of low testosterone can negatively impact your quality of life and future health.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Spearmint Tea for PCOS

Hormone imbalances are a characteristic feature of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) – you can read more about the many imbalances in my article Understanding PCOS. But research has shown that a simple treatment may help to balance one of the most common hormone imbalances in PCOS – elevated testosterone.

Researchers have found that drinking spearmint tea, two cups per day over a 30 day period decreased free and total testosterone levels compared to a group consuming a different placebo herbal tea. More importantly, the women in this study self-reported improvements in hirsutism (abnormal hair growth patterns).

This finding is remarkable for a number of reasons. First – improvements in testosterone levels can lead to more regular ovulation in women with PCOS and decrease symptoms associated with elevated testosterone (such as acne). Second – a decrease in hirsutism after just 30 days of study is a result many women with PCOS would be pleased to experience. A longer duration of spearmint tea use would likely result in more significant improvements in abnormal hair growth due to time needed to see changes in hair follicle response to androgen hormones.

Spearmint tea is also delicious, inexpensive and easy for most women to incorporate into their daily routines. Discuss with your Naturopathic Doctor whether spearmint tea might be a useful addition to your PCOS treatment plan!

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Reference:

Grant P. Spearmint herbal tea has significant anti-androgen effects in polycystic ovarian syndrome. A randomized controlled trial. Phytother Res. 2010 Feb;24(2):186-8.

 

 

Understanding Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

Polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) affects up to 1 in 10 women. It truly is a multi-headed beast – each woman manifests the hormonal imbalances and symptoms of PCOS differently. Only through understanding the underlying imbalances unique to each woman can we hope to overcome polycystic ovarian syndrome and achieve balanced, vibrant health.

What is PCOS?

PCOS is a “syndrome” – in medical language that means it is a condition characterized by a group of symptoms, not all of which are necessary for diagnosis. To be diagnosed with PCOS you must have two of the following:

  1. Infrequent or no ovulation (irregular or long menstrual cycles or no menstrual periods)
  2. Signs or symptoms (or laboratory testing) showing high androgens (testosterone or dihydrotestosterone) – these include acne, abnormal hair growth, hair loss, darkening skin at skin folds
  3. Polycystic ovaries on ultrasound

As you see it is possible to have PCOS and not have polycystic ovaries! It is a syndrome that results from hormone imbalances in the body – hormones that directly impact the ovaries and ovulation.

Causes of Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

What causes the hormone imbalance that leads to the symptoms associated with polycystic ovarian syndrome? We don’t have a clear answer to that for every woman. There are some risk factors associated with developing PCOS, but women with no risk factors can still develop this syndrome.

            ScaleRisk Factors for PCOS

  • Genetics
  • Family history of diabetes
  • Obesity
  • Insulin resistance
  • High blood sugar
  • Low blood sugar
  • Use of seizure medication (valproate)

Hormones and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome

There are a vast number of hormonal imbalances that are intricately intertwined in PCOS. A brief summary is given below, for a more in depth exploration, please read the article Hormones and Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome.

hormone balanceTestosterone and dihydrotestosterone (DHT) – levels of free and total testosterone are often elevated. Production of androgens (male hormones) in the ovaries is increased in PCOS. The increased levels of testosterone and DHT lead to the characteristic acne associated with PCOS.

Luteinizing hormone (LH) – increased LH is characteristic of PCOS. The diagnosis of PCOS is often identified when the LH:FSH ratio is greater than 2:1.

Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) – can be low or normal. The lack of ovulation that occurs in PCOS is partially due to the lack of follicle response to FSH.

Sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG) – levels are decreased. SHBG binds to testosterone and DHT, rendering them biologically unavailable. With low levels of SHBG, increased action of testosterone is seen in tissues (resulting in hair loss, abnormal hair growth, and acne).

Insulin – high levels of insulin, or resistance to insulin in the tissues, is thought to be a primary cause of PCOS. Many doctors think that insulin imbalances are the first step in the cascade of hormone imbalances that occur in PCOS.

Symptoms of PCOS

The symptoms of PCOS occur as a result of the hormonal imbalances at the root of this condition. Your symptoms can help guide an experienced clinician to identify the dominant imbalances resulting in your PCOS.

            Common symptoms of PCOS:

  • Obesity and weight management issues (only in 40-50% of PCOS sufferers)
  • Acne (typically along the chin and around the mouth)
  • Oily skin
  • Polycystic or enlarged ovaries (found on ultrasound)
  • Blood sugar imbalances (“hangry”, dizziness, lightheadedness)
  • Darkening of skin at skin folds (acanthosis nigricans)
  • Long or irregular menstrual cycles (due to lack of ovulation)

Naturopathic Management of PCOS

Naturopathic medicine has great potential in the treatment of polycystic ovarian syndrome because it focuses on individualized care. There is no “standard” protocol for PCOS, your ND will need to discuss your symptoms and recognize your state of hormonal imbalance to develop an effective treatment plan.

Organic VegetablesYour naturopath may order additional laboratory testing if the underlying hormonal imbalances are not clear. Testing may include salivary or blood tests, depending on which hormone is being assessed. You may be asked to keep a record of your Basal Body Temperature, a simple means of tracking the hormonal ebb and flow of your monthly cycle.

The cornerstone of treatment for PCOS is improving response of the body to insulin. This often involves exercise and consuming a whole foods diet that is low in refined and processed sugars. Botanical medicines and nutritional supplements may also be used to address specific hormone imbalances such as elevated testosterone or decreased sex hormone binding globulin. Please read the article Naturopathic Medicine for PCOS to learn about the many treatment options available.

Beyond Understanding

At this point you have an understanding of the symptoms and hormonal imbalances associated with PCOS. Continue your understanding by reading other articles in this series by Dr. Lisa Watson, ND including Hormonal Imbalances in PCOS, PCOS and Infertility, The PCOS Diet, PCOS in Adolescence and Naturopathic Medicine for PCOS.

If you are ready to start working on achieving your healthy balance, Dr. Watson is currently accepting new patients at both her Toronto clinics. Contact her for a complimentary meet and greet appointment, or book your initial appointment today.

 

 

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