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MTHFR in Mental Health

MTHFR is an essential component of human health, one that you may not have heard of, but you likely will be hearing more about it in the future.

MTHFR is an acronym for a gene – methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. This gene produces an enzyme essential for human health – methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHF). It has been estimated that somewhere between 30-85% of humans carry a mutation, or SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) in this gene. This can lead to minimal changes in the function of this gene, or significant changes that can drastically impact health. Our current best guess is that between 6-14% of caucasians, 2% of African descent, and up to 21% of Hispanics have a severe mutation.

MTHFR in Mental Health

One of the essential functions of MTHFR is to produce neurotransmitters. Individuals with MTHFR mutations may be more at risk of developing one of the many mental health conditions associated with MTHFR:

  • depression
  • bipolar disorder
  • attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • schizophrenia
  • autism
  • addiction
  • anxiety

The neurotransmitters produced during the MTHFR cycle, in particular serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine and melatonin, have important mood stabilizing effects. The decreased function of the MTHFR cycle in people with a MTHFR mutation can lead to lower levels of these neurotransmitters, increasing the risk of developing a mental health condition.

MTHFR and Anti-Depressants

In addition to increasing the odds of developing a mental health condition, an MTHFR defect can also alter the ability of a person to respond to antidepressant medications. A higher rate of non-responsiveness and/or adverse effects has been found in people with an MTHFR mutation.

MTHFR Testing

If you suspect you may have an MTHFR defect the only way to know for sure is to do a genetic test that will identify if you have a mutation in this important gene at one of two locations – known as C667T or A1298C. If you have a single mutation in one location (inherited from one parent) you have a “heterozygous” mutation – if you have two mutations in one location (inherited from both parents) then you have a “homozygous” mutation, which is generally more severe. If you have two mutations in both locations then you have a “compound homozygous” mutation, the most severe.

What to do about MTHFR

The most important thing to do about MTHFR is to support the normal function of this enzyme pathway with essential nutrients. This pathway (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) produces folate as one of it’s primary actions. Folate, vitamin B9, can be taken as a supplement and reduce the negative effects seen with MTHFR mutations. Avoiding things that can interfere with folate is also important – digestive diseases, poor diet, alcohol consumption and some medications (include the birth control pill). Additionally, avoiding synthetic folic acid, found mostly in processed foods (like bread, crackers and cereals), is also important as the folic acid can slow down the MTHFR cycle further.

In addition to taking a folate supplement, focusing on a healthy diet is essential for managing MTHFR. Folate comes from foliage – so eating your leafy greens, broccoli and beans can provide folate in your daily diet.

Treating MTHFR can be complex. Working with a qualified practitioner, well-versed in MTHFR is essential to improve your health and support your mind and body.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Wheat Woes: Celiac disease, wheat allergy and gluten sensitivity

Many people are beginning to recognize the personal benefits of a gluten-free diet. For some individuals the simple avoidance of gluten (a protein in wheat, barley and rye) can improve or completely resolve symptoms of diarrhea, constipation, gas and bloating.

So what is the problem with gluten? Why are so many people benefiting from avoiding this specific protein? The answer is not that simple. In fact, there are three distinct medical diagnoses that may apply to people who improve on a gluten free diet.

Celiac Disease

Bread slicedCeliac disease is an autoimmune disease impacting about 1 in 100 people. In this condition the body is stimulated to produce auto-antibodies against the lining of the small intestine. These auto-antibodies are only produced in the presence of gluten in the diet. Celiac disease incidence has increased 5-fold in the past 40 years – a trend that is seen with a number of autoimmune conditions. Having celiac disease increases the risk for the development of other autoimmune conditions in your lifetime. The only treatment for celiac disease is lifelong avoidance of gluten.

Wheat Allergy

Wheat allergy results when the body produces an allergic reaction to gluten or another component of wheat. The allergic sequence is similar to other allergies, with the release of histamine from mast cells and basophils, triggered by immunoglobulin E (IgE) cross-linking. Symptoms of wheat allergy include redness, swelling, hives and other allergy-type symptoms. Wheat allergy is the rarest of the wheat-associated diagnoses with only 1 in 500 people being impacted.

Gluten Sensitivity

By far the most common diagnosis associated with wheat is gluten sensitivity. It is estimated to impact 1 in 10 people and is 6x more prevalent than celiac disease. The symptoms of gluten sensitivity include:

  • Abdominal pain (68%)Gluten Free Logo
  • Eczema or rash (40%)
  • Headache (35%)
  • Foggy mind (34%)
  • Diarrhea (33%)
  • Depression (20%)
  • Anemia (20%)
  • Numbness in legs, arms or fingers (20%)
  • Joint pain (11%)

Diagnosis of gluten sensitivity is typically a diagnosis of exclusion. If you test negative for celiac disease (auto-immune antibodies), negative for wheat allergy (IgE immunoglobulins) but still improve on a gluten free diet then you will likely receive a diagnosis of gluten sensitivity.

Food sensitivity testing, such as the IgG food sensitivity panel, can help to confirm a diagnosis of gluten sensitivity. It can also identify other food sensitivities which may be occurring simultaneously, such as a dairy, egg or nut sensitivity.

If you suspect you may be gluten sensitive, cut it out of your diet for at least three weeks and watch your symptoms for improvement. Or contact your Naturopathic Doctor to discuss comprehensive testing for celiac disease, wheat allergy and gluten sensitivity. Take charge of your health, and let go of your wheat woes!

Select references

Sapone A, Lammers KM, Casolaro V, et al. Divergence of gut permeability and mucosal immune gene expression in two gluten-associated conditions: celiac disease and gluten sensitivity. BMC Med. 2011;9:e23

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Hashimoto’s and Gluten

Gluten. It seems like everyone is talking about it. Books are lining shelves declaring the evils of this grain-based protein most of us have been eating for years. The grocery stores are full of “gluten-free” labels and gluten free bakeries are popping up in cities all across the country.

Gluten Free LogoWhy are we suddenly so aware of this protein? And what does it mean for people who have Hashimoto’s? Let me take you through some of the basics.

What is Gluten?

Gluten is a protein found in several different grains – wheat, barley, rye, spelt, kamut and triticale. It is a combination of two different proteins, gliadin and glutenin. Not all grains contain gluten and a gluten-free diet can still provide the essential nutrients found in these grains.

Autoimmunity

Hashimoto’s thyroiditis is an autoimmune condition where the immune system attacks and destroys the thyroid gland. It is, in essence, an immune condition with the thyroid being the unfortunate victim.

Autoimmune conditions are thought to develop when there are a combination of different factors. The three most commonly suggested factors are:

  • Genetic predisposition
  • A triggering event – this can be a nutrient deficiency, acute illness, chronic infection, dysbiosis, excess stress, food sensitivities or impaired detoxification
  • Increased intestinal hyperpermeability or “leaky gut”

The increased intestinal hyperpermeability, or “leaky gut” is where gluten becomes a major issue.

Leaky Gut

Keep outThe cells that line our digestive tract are joined at tight junctions – these close connections allow only the smallest particles of digested food to present to our immune system. Certain foods, like gluten, are more difficult for our enzymes to completely digest. These partially digested proteins, called peptides, can cause inflammation at the lining of the digestive tract, leading to damage of the tight junctions. When these tight junctions are compromised they become more permeable, or leaky, allowing larger molecules (peptides) to present to our immune system.

Once the immune system has been exposed to these large peptide molecules it may begin to produce antibodies against the peptides – an attempt to protect us from this foreign molecule.

The issue of autoimmunity, especially Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, occurs when the immune antibodies begin to circulate through our body, searching for the sequence of amino acids that make up the gluten peptide. The surface of the thyroid gland is made up of fats and proteins – and unfortunately the amino acid sequence of proteins on the surface of the thyroid is the same as the gliadin peptide in gluten. This results in the immune system destroying the thyroid gland, mistaking it for the component of gluten that triggered the response in the digestive tract.

Gluten and Food Sensitivities

wheat is a common food allergenIn my practice I recommend that all people diagnosed with Hashimoto’s thyroiditis eliminate gluten from their diet. However, leaky gut can be caused by, or lead to many other food sensitivities which can also have the same devastating effect on the thyroid gland, and other tissues in the body.

Every person with an autoimmune condition, including Hashimoto’s should seriously consider having an IgG based food sensitivity panel done to identify their own sensitivities. Understanding the action of your immune system in your body is imperative to decreasing the overactivity of the immune system and preventing further damage to your body.

For more information on Naturopathic Medicine and Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis, please read the other articles on this website written by Dr. Lisa Watson, ND: Understanding Hashimoto’s, Hashimoto’s and Fertility, Naturopathic Treatments for Hashimoto’s. If you are ready to start on your path to healing your Hashimoto’s you can book an appointment with Dr. Lisa by following the links here.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Select references

Carrocio A, D’Alcam A, Cavataio F, et al. Gastroenterology. High Proportions of People With Nonceliac Wheat Sensitivity Have Autoimmune Disease or Antinuclear Antibodies.2015 Sep;149(3):596-603.e1.

Fasano A, Shea-Donohue T. Mechanisms of Disease: the role of intestinal barrier function in the pathogenesis of gastrointestinal autoimmune diseases. Nature Clinical Practices. 2005 Sep:2(9):416-422.

 

Natural Approaches to Heartburn

The number of patients in my practice with heartburn is staggering. And what is even more staggering to me is how many people think it is normal! Just because it is common does not mean that it is normal!

What is Heartburn?

Heartburn, also known as reflux or gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a burning sensation in the esophagus that may be associated with:

  • Sour, acidic taste in the mouth
  • Pain behind the breastbone or between the shoulder blades
  • Unexplained cough

A New Perspective on Heartburn

In conventional medicine, heartburn is the consequence of excess stomach acid and acid suppressing medications (proton pump inhibitors or calcium carbonate) to reduce symptoms. However, functional doctors and naturopathic doctors believe that low stomach acid may be a more likely cause of heartburn.

Stomach acid is necessary to for proper digestion. If acid production is decreased the stomach will not empty properly and the contents (partially digested food and stomach acid) can reflux up into the esophagus and cause heartburn.

Stomach acid production naturally declines as we age. Stress, unhealthy diet (high in refined grains, sugars and processed foods) and use of medications are all common causes of low stomach acid.

Treating Low Stomach Acid

Water There are a number of natural ways to improve your production of stomach acid. Your Naturopathic Doctor can help you to understand which options are best for you.

  1. Become a “chewitarian” – the longer the food spends in your mouth, the more signals your brain and enyzmes in your saliva will send to your stomach to produce stomach acid. So slow down, chew carefully and savour each bite.
  2. Limit beverages at mealtimes – water and other fluids can dilute stomach acid, requiring our body to produce more. Take only small sips of water during meals and save the majority of your water for between meals.
  3. Apple cider vinegar – can help low stomach acid by providing a source of acid, allowing your stomach to have an optimal pH even if you aren’t making enough stomach acid on your own. Doses vary, start low with 1 tsp and see if it helps you.
  4. Betaine hydrochloric acid – a powerful treatment for heartburn and low stomach acid, betaine HCl provides you with a safe source of stomach acid. This will help optimize your stomach acid levels and promote total digestion of food, leading to a healthy stomach emptying time and decreased symptoms. Your ND will give you guidelines on safe supplementation.
  5. Deglycyrrhizinated licorice (DGL) – an excellent support for heartburn, DGL improves symptoms of heartburn by healing the esophagus and tonifying the lower esophageal sphincter – the opening at the top of the stomach. Try chewing one capsule when you experience heartburn to decrease symptoms while you work to optimize your stomach acid levels.

The Importance of Treating Heartburn

Heartburn may be miserable, and uncomfortable and for many that is reason enough to try to clear the symptoms. But getting to the underlying cause of the heartburn is important because optimal digestion of our food is the only way we will get all of the nutrients we need for our bodies to function.

If you are producing inadequate stomach acid, or taking acid-suppressing medications, you may experience difficulty breaking down protein, an increase in food sensitivities, deficiencies in nutrients, and increased inflammation. The consequences of poor nutrient absorption can not be underestimated!

So speak with your Naturopath today to find ways to optimize your health and overcome your heartburn symptoms, once and for all!

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Nutritional Needs of Teens

There is a lot of growth during the teen years.  Emotional growth, intellectual growth, spiritual growth and, of course, physical growth.  All of this growing can be exhausting (this is one of the reasons teens need so much sleep!) It also means that nutritional needs are increased to support all this growth and change.

Teens need over 2 litres of water daily

The teen years are second only to pregnancy and lactation for high nutrient requirements.  The best way to ensure you are getting all of these nutrients is to eat a diverse diet high in different coloured fruits and vegetables, whole grains (such as brown rice, quinoa, barley, and millet), legumes and beans, lean meats (or alternatives) and low fat dairy (or alternatives).

Below are two charts on micronutrient (vitamins and minerals) and macronutrient (protein, carbohydrate, fats, water) nutritional needs.  Values given are daily requirements.

Micronutrient_Needs_Teens

*Vitamin D requirements are higher in Canada from October to May due to inadequate sun exposure during the winter.

**Any female who is sexually active should be taking an additional 400mcg daily to prevent birth defects if pregnancy occurs

Macronutrient_Needs_Teens

Remember: these reference values are for normal, apparently healthy individuals eating a mixed North American diet. An individual may have individual physiological, health, or lifestyle characteristics that may require different intakes of specific nutrients.

If you are concerned you are not getting enough nutrients in your diet consider a high quality multivitamin-mineral supplement to meet your needs.  It is better to take a supplement to meet your needs than to deprive your body of the building blocks it needs to grow and maintain health through your teens and beyond.

References:

Health Canada Dietary Reference Intake Tables.  Available online at: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/reference/table/index-eng.php http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/reference/table/index-eng.php

Gratitude Goodies

Every year at the Integrative Health Institute, we celebrate our anniversary by celebrating you – our community – the reason we are able to do what we do.  You are the motivation that brings us to work every day.  You are the fire behind our passion for health care.  And so we thank you!

This year I celebrated our #IHIgratitude party by making my favourite healthy vegan snack – protein power balls! We’re calling them Gratitude Goodies and the recipes are below.

Ginger Coconut Gratitude Goodies

1 cup dates (soaked)
1 cup mixed raw almonds and cashews (soaked)
1 scoop Vega vanilla protein powder
1 tbsp coconut oil
1 tbsp grated fresh ginger
1/2 cup unsweetened coconut

Soak dates and nuts for 10 minutes in warm (not boiling) water.  Drain and place in food processor.  Pulse to mix.  Add protein powder, coconut oil and ginger.  Blend in food processor until desired consistency (I like a bit of crunch so I don’t puree until smooth).  Form balls and roll in coconut.

Mexican Hot Chocolate Gratitude Goodies

1 cup dates (soaked)
1 cup mixed raw almonds and cashews (soaked)
1 scoop Vega vanilla protein powder
1 tbsp coconut oil
1 tbsp raw cacao nibs
1/4 cup Mexican hot chocolate powder (I used the one from Soma Chocolatiers)

Soak dates and nuts for 10 minutes in warm (not boiling) water.  Drain and place in food processor.  Pulse to mix.  Add protein powder, coconut oil and cacao nibs.  Blend in food processor until desired consistency (I like a bit of crunch so I don’t puree until smooth).  Form balls and roll in powdered chocolate.

The PCOS Diet

A nutritious diet is the cornerstone of health – a foundation on which we can build healthy choices and behaviours. In no condition is this more true than polycystic ovarian syndrome. Choosing the right foods for PCOS and avoiding others can be enough for many women to balance their hormones and decrease symptoms of PCOS. And there are no harmful side effects – just the benefits of a healthy diet and vibrantly healthy lifestyle.

The PCOS Diet – What to Avoid

  1. Refined grains

Breads, bagels, muffins, crackers, pasta – all the many forms of refined grains that are common in the western diet, should be avoided in women with PCOS. These high glycemic-index foods quickly raise blood sugar levels and can lead to insulin resistance – a condition where your cells no longer respond to insulin. This is thought to be one of the underlying hormonal imbalances in PCOS.

  1. Refined sugars

Fighting Sugar AddictionSugars found in cookies, cakes, candies, sodas and sweetened beverages can wreak havoc on your hormones in a similar way to refined grains. Best to leave these foods out of your diet entirely and instead opt for naturally sweet fruits to nourish your sweet tooth.

  1. Alcohol

Alcohol is one of the most hormonally devastating things we can put in our body. Not only is it made of mostly sugar (and in PCOS we know what sugar can do to our insulin response!) it also prevents the liver from being able to effectively process and eliminate excess hormones. Women with PCOS also have an increased risk of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Limit alcohol consumption to red wine, have no more than one serving per day and don’t have it every day.

  1. Red meat

Red meats are high in saturated fats and contribute to inflammation. Saturated fats can also lead to increased estrogen levels. I recommend limiting red meat to lean cuts of grass-fed, hormone free meat and consuming it no more often than 1-2 times per week.

  1. Dairy

Dairy is a significant source of inflammation, unhealthy saturated fats and should be avoided by women with PCOS. Additionally, dairy increases the production of insulin-like growth factor (IGF) which is known to negatively impact ovulation in PCOS. Rather than reducing dairy, you should consider avoiding it all together to help manage your PCOS.

The PCOS Diet – What to Enjoy

  1. Vegetables and fruits

Eat food

The foundation of the PCOS diet is a plant-based diet. Vegetables, fruits, beans and legumes, nuts and seeds are provide the body with essential nutrients and fiber. Soluble fiber such as that found in apples, carrots, cabbage, whole grains such as oatmeal, and beans and legumes, can lower insulin production and support hormone balance in PCOS.

  1. Proteins

Healthy proteins are an absolute necessity for women with PCOS. While dairy and red meat are not recommended, plant based proteins like nuts, seeds, beans, lentils and legumes are encouraged. Other healthy proteins like turkey, chicken breast, eggs and fish should also be emphasized. For most women with PCOS, a daily intake of 60-80g of protein per day is recommended.

  1. Wild salmon

An excellent source of protein, wild salmon is also rich in omega-3 fatty acids. Omega 3s improve insulin response and blood sugar metabolism and studies have shown lower circulating testosterone levels in women who supplement with omega 3s. Choose wild caught salmon and other cold water fish two to three times per week and incorporate other healthy sources of omega 3s such as walnuts and flax seeds into your diet.

  1. Cinnamon

CinnamonSpices are an amazing way to increase antioxidants in your diet, and cinnamon is especially useful for women with PCOS because it can help to regulate blood sugar. Sprinkle it on apples, oats or quinoa in the morning, add it to teas and use it in flavourful stews or curries.

  1. Pumpkin seeds

    These zinc-rich seeds help to lower testosterone levels and are an easy, high protein snack to enjoy every day!

  2. Green tea

Studies have shown that green tea extract helps to improve the response of cells to insulin, as well as lower insulin levels. Consider drinking a few cups of green tea daily – or better yet, have some matcha to get a big nutritional benefit!

  1. Spearmint tea

Spearmint tea for PCOSAs little as two cups of spearmint tea per day for a month can lower testosterone levels and improve symptoms of abnormal hair growth (hirsutism) in women with PCOS. A must for all women with polycystic ovarian syndrome!

  1. Broccoli

Cabbage, cauliflower, bok choy, broccoli, kohl rabi, kale – these brassica vegetables are a source of indole-3-carbinole, a compound thought to support the detoxification and breakdown of hormones in the liver.

  1. Walnuts

Researchers have found that consuming 1/3 cup of walnuts per day for six weeks can reduce testosterone levels, improve insulin sensitivity, and improve fatty acid status in the body. Combine these with your pumpkin seeds for a satisfying afternoon snack!

  1. Leafy greens

Spinach, kale, arugula and all the amazing variety of leafy greens are good sources of vitamin B6 – a nutrient necessary for balancing prolactin levels – a hormone that is often elevated in PCOS. Greens are also high in calcium, a mineral necessary for healthy ovulation. One more great reason to get those greens!

I hope you will embrace the PCOS diet – you really can heal your body through food medicine. If you need more support or guidance, contact me to book a free 15 minute consultation and together we can find your vibrant balance.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Select References

Kaur, Sat Dharam. The complete natural medicine guide to women’s health. Toronto. Robert Rose Inc. 2005.

Hudson, Tori. Women’s encyclopedia of natural medicine. Los Angeles. Keats publishing. 2007.

Spearmint Tea for PCOS

Hormone imbalances are a characteristic feature of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) – you can read more about the many imbalances in my article Understanding PCOS. But research has shown that a simple treatment may help to balance one of the most common hormone imbalances in PCOS – elevated testosterone.

Researchers have found that drinking spearmint tea, two cups per day over a 30 day period decreased free and total testosterone levels compared to a group consuming a different placebo herbal tea. More importantly, the women in this study self-reported improvements in hirsutism (abnormal hair growth patterns).

This finding is remarkable for a number of reasons. First – improvements in testosterone levels can lead to more regular ovulation in women with PCOS and decrease symptoms associated with elevated testosterone (such as acne). Second – a decrease in hirsutism after just 30 days of study is a result many women with PCOS would be pleased to experience. A longer duration of spearmint tea use would likely result in more significant improvements in abnormal hair growth due to time needed to see changes in hair follicle response to androgen hormones.

Spearmint tea is also delicious, inexpensive and easy for most women to incorporate into their daily routines. Discuss with your Naturopathic Doctor whether spearmint tea might be a useful addition to your PCOS treatment plan!

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Reference:

Grant P. Spearmint herbal tea has significant anti-androgen effects in polycystic ovarian syndrome. A randomized controlled trial. Phytother Res. 2010 Feb;24(2):186-8.

 

 

Celiac Disease in Pregnancy

Celiac disease

Celiac disease is more than a gluten intolerance. It is an immune reaction that is triggered by exposure to gluten (a protein found in wheat, rye and other grains) that results in inflammation and damage to the digestive tract. The small intestines, the part of the digestive tract that is damaged by gluten in celiac disease, is also the location of most nutrient absorption. This inflammatory damage can lead to significant nutrient deficiencies and health problems outside the digestive tract.

More than 330 000 Canadians are thought to have celiac disease (rates have doubled in the past 25 years), but only one-third of those people have been diagnosed. Women have higher rates of celiac disease, although we’re not entirely sure why. Celiac disease does not always manifest clear symptoms (gas, bloating, diarrhea) so it can go for years without a diagnosis.

Celiac Disease During Pregnancy

Bread slicedWomen with undiagnosed or untreated celiac disease can experience negative outcomes in pregnancy – longer time to conceive, increased rates of neural tube defects, increased rates of miscarriage, more fetal growth restriction and increased low birth weight babies. Additionally, women with undiagnosed or untreated celiac disease have been found to have a shorter duration of breastfeeding (about 2.5 times shorter) than treated women with celiac disease.

The poor absorption of folic acid in celiac disease may be the primary cause of the majority of these outcomes. Folic acid is necessary for DNA replication and the production of new cells – two very important functions in early embryo development. We know that folic acid deficiency can lead to an increased risk of neural tube defects and has been linked with an increased risk of miscarriage. Additionally, deficiencies in zinc and selenium are common in untreated celiac disease. These nutrients are also necessary to ensure healthy pregnancy.  You can read more about the nutrient deficiencies in celiac disease in my article Nutrient Deficiencies in Celiac Disease.

There may also be an immune component to the impact of untreated celiac disease on pregnancy. It has been postulated that anti-transglutaminase antibodies may be able to damage the placenta or the maternal endometrial cells. These antibodies are only present during active, untreated celiac disease.

Testing for Celiac Disease in Pregnancy

Some researchers suggest that all women with unexplained miscarriages be tested for celiac disease. Some suggest that all women who are trying to conceive be tested. Still others recommend testing only if hemoglobin or ferritin (iron) levels are low. Testing is done with an initial blood test which can then be followed with a biopsy of the lining of the small intestine to confirm the diagnosis. Your Naturopathic Doctor or Medical Doctor can help you decide whether testing is warranted.

Managing Celiac Disease During Pregnancy

The negative outcomes of celiac disease on pregnancy can all be managed by consuming a gluten free diet and taking appropriate supplementation to ensure nutrient adequacy. In the majority of women, 6 to 12 months of a gluten free diet can reduce the risk of negative pregnancy outcomes down to normal levels. Using a professional quality prenatal or folic acid supplement can also help to improve pregnancy outcomes in women with celiac disease – discuss with your Naturopathic Doctor which gluten-free supplements will be most appropriate for you.

Select References

  1. Moleskia SM, Lindenmeyer CC, Veloskic JJ, Millera RS, Millera CL, Kastenberga D, DiMarinoa AJ. Increased rates of pregnancy complications in women with celiac disease. Ann Gastroenterol 2015;28:236-40.
  2. Tersigni C, Castellani R, de Waure C, Fattorossi A, De Spirito M, Gasbarrini A, et al. Celiac disease and reproductive disorders: meta-analysis of epidemiological associations and potential pathogenic mechanisms. Hum Reprod Update 2014;20(4):582-593
  3. Martinelli P, Troncone R, Paparo F, Torre P, Trapanese E, Fasano C, et al. Coeliac disease and unfavourable outcome of pregnancy. Gut 2000;46(3):332-5.
  4. Dickey W, Stewart F, Nelson J, McBreen G, McMillan SA, Porter KG. Screening for coeliac disease as a possible maternal risk factor for neural tube defect. Clin Genet 1996;49(2):107-8.
  5. Rostami K, Steegers EA, Wong WY, Braat DD, Steegers-Theunissen RP. Celiac disease and reproductive disorders: a neglected association. Eur J Obstet Gynecol Reprod Biol 2001;96(2):146-9.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Understanding Food Sensitivities

Each system in the body is important, performing essential functions for the health of the body. But I believe the digestive tract is one of the most important, because it provides every other system with nutrients for optimal function. If the digestive tract isn’t functioning well, every other system in the body will suffer.

Food sensitivities are a common cause of digestive discomfort and testing for these sensitivities can allow for healing to occur and improve not only gut symptoms, but overall health as well.

Symptoms of Food Sensitivities

Food sensitivities can result in digestive symptoms, but also have an incredibly wide range of symptoms throughout the body including:

  • Indigestion, gas and bloating
  • Diarrhea and/or constipationdigestive problems in teens
  • Acid reflux or heart burn
  • Migraines and headaches
  • Irritability, depression, anxiety
  • Fatigue
  • Brain fog, difficulty concentrating
  • Hyperactivity and ADHD
  • Acne, psoriasis, eczema
  • Joint pain
  • Chronic or recurrent infections
  • Sinusitis

What is a Food Sensitivity?

One little known fact about our bodies is that the majority of our immune system is found in our digestive tract. When we consume a food our immune system assesses it for the potential to cause us harm. If the immune system considers the food to be a potential threat it initiates a chain of reactions that results in the release of powerful chemical agents – such as histamines, cytokines, lymphokines, interferon and immunoglobulins (antibodies). These hormone-like substances can influence the function of our digestive tract, hormone system, immune system and mood. This is what occurs in a food sensitivity.

Over time, exposure to food sensitivities can damage the lining of the digestive tract, leading to greater immune response, decreased nutrient absorption and worsening of symptoms.

Food Allergies and Food Sensitivities

PeanutsBoth allergies and sensitivities are immune reactions that result from exposure to specific foods, but there are some key differences between these two conditions.

A food allergy is an acute onset hypersensitivity reaction that results in an increased production of an immunoglobulin, IgE, in the body. This triggers a cascade of reactions, that may result in airway closure, throat swelling, tongue swelling, hives and other severe symptoms leading to anaphylaxis. Food allergies can be life-threatening.

A food sensitivity is a delayed onset hypersensitivity reaction that results in an increased production of an immunoglobulin, IgG, in the body. This too triggers a cascade of reactions that are more mild but predominantly inflammatory in their origin. Food sensitivities are not life-threatening, they can develop at any age and may or may not be present for life. 

Testing for Food Sensitivities

The most accurate way to diagnose food sensitivities is through a blood test that measures levels of the IgG immunoglobulin in the body. The IgG immunoglobulin is produced for several hours or days after exposure to a sensitive food and persists for several weeks to months.

This method of testing allows us to test for IgG response to up to 200 different foods, giving an understanding of what food sensitivities are present, and the severity of the sensitivity.

Treatment of Food Sensitivities

Once food sensitivities are identified, successful treatment requires five essential components:

  1. Avoidance of identified sensitivities/ intolerances
  2. Supporting balanced immune function
  3. Re-establishment of proper intestinal flora
  4. Healing the damaged intestinal mucosa
  5. Correction of underlying cause (e.g. maldigestion, insufficient enzymes)

Nutritional and botanical supplements are used to support the body as it repairs damaged tissue.  Supplemental enzymes may be used short term to support digestion as the body works towards correcting imbalances.

Why should I have food sensitivity/ intolerance testing done?

As I mentioned, the digestive system is one of the most important organ systems in the body. If you are suffering from any of the symptoms listed above, understanding the reaction of your body to foods you consume regularly can provide you with valuable information on the function of your body and empower you to improve your health.

One of the best reasons to have food sensitivity/ intolerance testing done is because you can cure the intolerance.  When you consume foods that you are intolerant to you are creating a state of inflammation (a product of immune system activation) in your digestive tract and other systems in your body.  When you take out the food intolerance, and give your body time and support to heal the damaged tissues in many cases (up to 80%) you can resume eating that food in moderate quantities. 

Learn More About Food Sensitivities

To learn more about food sensitivities, you can read my article comparing the three most common methods of food sensitivity testing here. Rocky Mountain Analytical provides information on the IgG food sensitivity test here. You can also book a free 15 minute meet and greet appointment to discuss your questions and learn more about food sensitivities and learn how to live a vibrantly, healthy life.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.