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Vampires and Vitamin D Deficiency

Very little is known about the health issues impacting our supernatural community. Notoriously secretive, no agency (that we are aware of) is maintaining statistics on the health of supernatural beings. In this series I will be bringing a greater awareness to this issue, discussing some of the most common concerns impacting the magical members of our global community. Perhaps through education we may bring some light to those inhabiting our darkest nights.

No Sunshine in Their Lives

The existence of vampires has been documented in cultures around the world since ancient times. While exact population counts are impossible to attain, vampires are thought to be one of the most populous of all the supernatural beings.

Dwelling only in the darkness, vampires at are significant risk of vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D is produced when the sun’s ultraviolet rays (UVB rays) penetrate the skin. With full body exposure to sunlight, a body can produce upwards of 10 000 to 20 000IU of vitamin D after just 15 minutes. This duration of sun exposure would certainly be fatal to a vampire.

40% of Humans, 100% of Vampires

It is estimated that 40% of humans are deficient in vitamin D, with rates being much higher during the winter months when UVB rays are unable to the Northern hemisphere. With no exposure to the sun it may be estimated that 100% of vampires are likely to be deficient in vitamin D.

Risks of Vitamin D Deficiency

Vitamin D deficiency can lead to an increased incidence of colds and influenza, osteoporosis, autoimmune disease, and over 16 different types of cancer, including breast, pancreatic and lung cancer.

Vitamin D Supplementation for Vampires

Ideally testing for vitamin D levels should be carried out on vampires to determine ideal dosing. As vampires are notoriously secretive, and very few laboratories are open after dark, testing may be difficult to attain. I suggest all vampires consider a vitamin D supplement, to ensure their needs are met. A general guideline for humans and vampires is to take a minimum of 1000IU per day. Your Naturopathic Doctor can help to individualize your dose based on your body weight and sun exposure (or lack thereof).

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes by the supernatural community. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed monster doctor. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Frankenstein, or other primary care provider is recommended for any supernatural being suffering from a health problem.

The Empowered Woman’s Guide to UTIs

This month I’m sharing some of my best advice on how to support and maintain a healthy lady garden. And no discussion on lady garden health would be complete without a mention of those miserable, burning, peeing-a-million-times-a-day UTIs.

Urinary Tract Infections

While men get UTIs as well, women are much more prone to getting urinary tract infections. This is due to a couple of unique things about the lady garden anatomy – the urethra is very close to two bacteria-filled environments, the vagina and the anus, and the urethra in women is much shorter, allowing a fast-track for bacteria to get into the urinary bladder.

Sex can also increase the incidence of UTIs in women because of, well, friction. If the bacteria in the vaginal tract are not healthily balanced those bad bacteria can be pushed into the urethra and lead to a UTI (this is why we are told to pee after sex ladies!)

Symptoms of UTIs

Most women are pretty fast to identify a UTI. There is no mistaking that burning sensation when you pee, as well as that urgent and frequent need to urinate – even when very little comes out each time. Other symptoms to pay attention to are: cloudy urine, pain in the lower back or lower abdomen, or fatigue, fever and chills. If you pain, fever or fatigue – get to your doctor – the infection may have moved into your kidneys which needs immediate attention.

An Empowered Approach to Treating UTIs

While most women are given an antibiotic for UTIs – a treatment which is absolutely necessary in some cases – many women can manage their UTIs quickly and easily with a more natural and empowered approach. There is much more to the treatment of UTIs than just killing off bacteria (those antibiotics will kill off both good and bad bacteria) – we also need to support the health of the lady garden and the immune system.

Lifestyle and Prevention

If you have ever had a UTI it is likely you have been given this advice, but it is so important that it is worth mentioning again. Follow these simple tips to prevent UTIs:

  1. Pee after having sex (to flush the urethra of any bacteria that may have gotten in there)
  2. Drink lots of water
  3. Pee often – don’t hold it in!
  4. Wipe from front to back
  5. Don’t use scented products on your lady garden
  6. Wear cotton underwear and loose fitting clothes

Diet to Prevent Bladder Irritation

Some foods can promote a bladder environment that makes it more likely for you to develop UTIs – and can make it harder to effective treat infections, leading to an increased likelihood of chronic or recurrent urinary tract infections (no thank you!)

Limit caffeine, refined sugar, white flour, alcohol, and food allergies to support the health of your bladder and reduce irritation. If you are a smoker, you should quit as well.

Get Hydrated

Another piece of obvious advice, the importance of hydration can NOT be underemphasized in the treatment of UTIs. I recommend drinking water like it is your day job when actively treating a UTI. But for prevention you should still drink at least 2 litres of water per day. Avoid fluids that contain caffeine and sugar, and stick instead with just plain water – or water with lemon if you’d like.

Keep Your pH Balanced

We talked a lot about the importance of pH balance in the lady garden in the BV and yeast infection articles, and pH balance is just as important for urinary tract infections. Our urine should be slightly acidic (like our lady garden!) which creates an environment that is inhospitable to those UTI-causing bacteria, like e. coli.

Vitamin C is one of the easiest and most effective ways to support the proper pH of the urine. During acute UTIs you can take higher doses of vitamin C (discuss your dose with your Naturopath), and for maintenance take 1-2g per day in divided doses (morning and evening).

Promote Healthy Bacteria

UTIs are caused by the presence of nasty bacteria – most often e. coli, in the urinary tract. Promoting healthy levels of beneficial bacteria, especially lactobacillus, will prevent there from being large colonies of e. coli in the vaginal tract, urinary tract and digestive tract. A daily probiotic supplement is absolutely recommended, and I will often recommend a topical probiotic to be applied to the lady garden during acute infection.

Clear Out the Urethra

We’ve all heard of using cranberry to treat UTIs, and there is evidence that this treatment will help. Cranberry contains a compound called proanthocyanidin that prevents bacteria from adhering to the walls of the urinary tract. This allows you to clear the bacteria much faster. For an acute infection you need to use unsweetened 100% cranberry juice and drink a good amount per day – up to 16 ounces, diluted in water.

Banish Bad Bacteria

There are some excellent natural plant-based treatments for killing off the bacteria that cause UTIs. I never recommend these in isolation – they need to be taken as part of an empowered treatment plan. Destroying bacteria alone will not adequately treat a UTI.

Uva ursi is a powerful antimicrobial that can be highly effective in eradicating bacteria, including e. coli. It is not for use in pregnancy, breastfeeding, children or for more than one week at a time.

Goldenseal is another excellent antimicrobial that is effective against e. coli. It can be used as a supplement, in a tea, or as a lady garden rinse after sexual activity.

Boost Immune Function

To support your immune system, be sure you are maintaining healthy vitamin D levels. Vitamin D is necessary for the production of antimicrobial peptides – our body’s own antibiotics. Supplementation with vitamin D has been found to be associated with a decreased incidence of UTIs. And since just about every Canadian is deficient from October to May, a daily supplement is necessary for most everyone.

Empowered and UTI-Free!

I hope you can now see all the many factors that go into treating and preventing UTIs.  Working with a Naturopathic Doctor can help you to individualize your plan – to be sure that you are taking all the necessary steps to be empowered in the care of your lady garden.  If you’d like to talk – drop me a line!  You can book a 15 minute meet and greet session, join me on Facebook or Instagram.  I’m thrilled to a part of your empowered journey.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Natural Treatments for Pain-Free Periods

Natural treatment options for period cramps

Ok ladies. In the last article we talked about why your periods can be painful – conditions l

ike endometriosis, fibroids or pelvic inflammatory disease, and lifestyle factors. We also talked my top ten lifestyle tips for pain-free periods. (If you haven’t read that article, pop over and read it now, then come on back and join me here. I’ll wait.)

In this article we’re going to go deeper into the science on period pain and discuss ten of most promising natural treatments for managing period cramps and painful periods.

But remember, these won’t work if you don’t have a healthy foundation in place, so start with the lifestyle changes, and then work with your Naturopathic Doctor to layer in some of these treatments to help you achieve your pain-free period!

Nutrients for Menstrual Cramps

B1 – Thiamine

Ah, thiamine, vitamin B1 – named so because it was the first B vitamin discovered! I’ve got a weak spot for B vitamins (and all vitamins really) because they are literally how our bodies get sh*t done! Thiamine is needed for your body to make energy from food – especially the grains that it is abundant in.

The mechanism by which this B vitamin can help period cramping stems from it’s action on the central nervous system and neuromuscular system – all coming down to it being effective for reducing spasmodic uterine pain (i.e. cramping). One study (link: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/8935744) found that taking vitamin B1 daily for 3 months completely alleviated period pain in 87% of study participants – damn! Worth a shot I think!

B6 – Pyridoxine

Vitamin B6 has fast become one of my favourite B vitamins (sorry B12!) due to it’s profound actions on female hormone balance. In addition to supporting energy production (just like all the B vitamins), vitamin B6 is needed to make progesterone, serotonin, norepinephrine and melatonin.

When used with its BFF, magnesium, vitamin B6 may be helpful in decreasing period cramps. When used for 10 days prior to the period, women have reported less painful periods (and less premenstrual acne!) when using a combination of B6 and magnesium. While it may not be enough on its own, it can be an important part of a treatment plan for period cramps.

Magnesium

Magnesium, known primarily for its ability to relax muscle (making it incredibly useful for blood pressure, muscle cramps and asthma), is unfortunately one of the most common nutrient deficiencies in North America. Found mostly in unprocessed foods (like leafy greens, nuts and seeds), magnesium deficiency can cause:

  • fatigue
  • irritability
  • weakness
  • muscle spasms
  • menstrual cramps
  • poor nail growth (I get asked about this issue all the time!)
  • insomnia
  • sugar cravings
  • anxiety

It has been suggested that the majority of women with PMS have a deficiency of magnesium – unfortunately magnesium is not easily tested for in laboratory tests, so deficiency often goes undiagnosed.

But the benefits of magnesium are not going unnoticed! A Cochrane study found that using magnesium for period cramps was effective for pain relief and resulted in women using less pain medication during their periods. Win! Magnesium: 1, period pain: 0.

Omega 3s

The last of our nutrients for period cramps, are our omega 3 fatty acids. These amazing compounds decrease inflammation (by altering prostaglandin production – remember this from the last article?) and taking relatively high doses (around 2 grams per day) has been found to reduce pain scores in women with period pain. And with all the side effects of omega 3s (healthy skin, less inflammation, improved mood, better heart health), it sure won’t hurt to give these a try.

Botanicals for Menstrual Cramps

While nutrients help our body to function optimally (that’s what they do!), botanicals, or plant medicines, act more like medications – changing or encouraging our bodies to function in specific ways. Most often I have my patients on a combination of nutrients (Woot! Optimal health!) and plant medicines to get the best outcomes.

Valerian

Best known for it’s sleep supporting actions, valerian (Valerian officinalis) can be very supportive for managing painful periods. With the ability to bind to GABA receptors in our brain (the same ones Valium uses), valerian can reduce pain, anxiety and insomnia. It has also been found to reduce spasmodic contractions – those same ones that lead to all the pain of period cramps. Valerian doesn’t need to be taken all month – just during your period to manage the discomfort and misery of painful periods.

Crampbark

Well doesn’t the name just say it all?? Crampbark (Viburnum opulus) has been used for generations for period cramps. Acting as a uterine relaxer and antispasmodic, crampbark is your best friend if your period cramps are accompanied by low back pain or pain that radiates into your thighs.   Taken in a similar manner as ibuprofen, one capsule of crampbark every 3-4 hours can help to reduce cramping and pain.

Ginger

I hate to play favourites (no, that’s not true. I totally love my favourites), but ginger is the BOMB when it comes to managing period pain.

With antispasmodic effects as well as the ability to inhibit the production of inflammatory and spasmodic prostaglandins (again with the prostaglandins!), ginger is a powerhouse of period pain management.

There have been studies comparing ginger with ibuprofen and found no difference in the effectiveness of the two treatments for period pain – in fact, more women in the ginger group were completely pain free than in the ibuprofen group. BOOM!

Ginger is most effective starting a few days before your period, and continuing through the first days when cramping is most likely to occur.

Black Cohosh

One of the best researched botanical medicines in the world, black cohosh’s claim to fame is in managing symptoms of menopause. But that’s not all it is good for.

Black cohosh (Actaea racemosa) is another uterine relaxer that can be useful for period cramping. It’s best for women who also have significant water retention (think swollen ankles, bloating and tender breasts), irritability during PMS, and delayed or irregular menstrual periods.

Other Natural Supplements

A few other natural medicines can help you achieve your dream of a pain-free period. And I certainly couldn’t leave them out! These two treatments are best used under supervision or advisement of your Naturopathic Doctor – so have a talk with them about whether to include these in your plan for a Pain-Free Period!

Melatonin

Melatonin for period crampsMelatonin is most commonly thought of as our sleep hormone, produced by the pineal gland in our brain to support sleep-wake cycles. But it does so much more than that!

Melatonin levels are lower during the second half of our menstrual cycle (during our luteal phase), and this is thought to be a factor in the development of period pain.

When melatonin levels are high, it can decrease the contractile force of the uterus – decreasing painful cramps. As well melatonin is known to have analgesic properties – decreasing pain. Melatonin also inhibits the production of those pesky prostaglandins that lead to most period pain.

Safe for most women, melatonin should be used for a few days prior to the onset of the period and for the first few days of the period. Taken before bed, you’ll likely get some stellar sleep as well!

BHRT Progesterone

For women whose period pain does not improve, no matter how many things they try, bioidentical progesterone can be a game changer.

Progesterone is the hormone that dominates the second half of the menstrual cycle, and a drop in the level of progesterone leads to an increase in inflammatory arachidonic acid and prostaglandins from the uterus. Welcome to Pain City.

If we can lessen the severity of this drop, or delay it, then often we can reduce the pain and intensity of uterus contractions that come from a hard drop in progesterone.

Best indicated for women in their 30s and 40s, bioidentical progesterone should be prescribed by a knowledgeable practitioner. Used for somewhere between 3-12 days before the onset of the period, progesterone may be exactly what some women need.

Onwards in your Pain-Free Period Journey!

Ladies, you don’t have to suffer. There are SO many things you can do to manage your periods so that they do not negatively impact your life. If you want to learn more, browse through some of the other articles on this website, or book an appointment to get your periods back on track!

WTF is MTHFR?

The world of genetics is confusing AF.  But trust me, you will be hearing more and more about genetics in the coming years.  In 2003 researchers completed The Human Genome Project, a many year endeavour to sequence the human genome and understand what our genes can tell us about our health.  And one of the most important genes identified was MTHFR.

MTHFR

MTHFR is the acronym for the gene that makes methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. This is an essential step in the methylation pathway – a complex pathway that results in the production of neurotransmitters (mental health), glutathione (liver, inflammation and antioxidant health), and processing of estrogen and testosterone (hormone health). Methylation has been considered by many to be the most important enzyme function in the human body.

MTHFR Polymorphisms

Somewhere between 30-50% (perhaps more) people carry a mutation (also called a single nucleotide polymorphism – or SNP) in the MTHFR gene, with an estimated 14-20% of people having a more severe mutation. First identified by the Human Genome Project, researchers noted that people with the MTHFR mutation were more likely to develop certain diseases, including ADHD, autism, Alzheimer’s, atherosclerosis and autoimmune disorders.

Autism Alzheimer’s ADHD Atherosclerosis Miscarriages Fibromyalgia
Deep vein thrombosis Neural tube defects Gluten intolerance Pernicious anemia Schizophrenia Chronic fatigue syndrome
Post-menopausal depression Chemical sensitivities Parkinson’s Irritable bowel syndrome Pre-eclampsia Stroke
Spina bifida Bipolar disorder Male infertility Vascular dementia Blood clots Congenital heart defects
Gastric cancer Migraines with aura Low HDL cholesterol Epilepsy Atherosclerosis Oral clefts
Type I Diabetes Cervical dysplasia Glaucoma Prostate cancer Multiple sclerosis Essential hypertension
Thyroid cancer Premature death Heart murmurs Placental abruption Myocardial infarction Tongue tie
Asthma Bladder cancer Low testosterone Heavy metal toxicity
Conditions Associated with MTHFR Polymorphisms

It is important to remember that just because you have inherited a gene (thanks mom and dad), does not mean you will develop one of these health conditions. There are many factors (diet, lifestyle, nutritional status, environment) that contribute to gene expression.

Your genes are not your destiny, but they are your tendency

MTHFR C667T and MTHFR A1298C

Two main MTHFR mutations have been identified and are the focus of most research.

Mutations are inherited from our parents, and as such we have two copies of each gene. A mutation on either of these genes can be heterozygous (+/-) – meaning only one copy is abnormal – or homozygous (+/+), meaning both inherited copies is mutated. Homozygous mutations are more likely to cause health problems. And having a homozygous mutation in both MTHFR C667T and MTHFR A1298C is considered to be the most problematic.

The Consequences of MTHFR Mutations

The importance of the methylation cycle, impacted by MTHFR mutations, can not be understated. Some of the consequences of altered MTHFR function include:

  • Decreased methylationMTHFR, naturopath, nutrigenomics
  • Increased heavy metal toxicity (iron, copper, lead, mercury)
  • Low iron (often secondary to elevated copper)
  • Increased homocysteine leading to vascular inflammation (cardiovascular disease, increased blood pressure, increased risk of vascular dementia)
  • Poor conversion of homocysteine to glutathione (increased stress, fatigue, toxin build up, cellular stress)
  • Poor conversion of homocysteine to methionine (increased atherosclerosis, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, anemia, inflammation)
  • Decreased production of SAMe and decreased serotonin levels (depression)

Nutrigenomics for MTHFR

One of the main reasons I became interested in genetic medicine, is the ability of nutrients, diet and lifestyle to strongly influence the function of our genes.  This field of study is known as nutrigenomics. 

When we know what our genetic tendencies are, we can alter and optimize them through dietary and supplemental choices. It’s an empowering way to look at our bodies.

In order to optimize MTHFR function, there are some things that need to be avoided:

  1. Synthetic folic acid – further slows the MTHFR function
  2. Cyanocobalamin – a form of vitamin B12 that slows methylation
  3. Birth control pills – block the uptake of folate in the gut
  4. Methotrexate – another medication that blocks folate uptake
  5. Proton pump inhibitors – a medication for heartburn that alters stomach acid levels and decreases vitamin B12 absorption
  6. Processed grains – contain synthetic folic acid
  7. Mercury amalgams and heavy metals – can lead to greater heavy metal toxicity due to poor metal clearance

Individuals who have MTHFR polymorphisms will often thrive with appropriate nutritional support. Supplements that can help to improve methylation are the cornerstone of MTHFR therapy.

Supplemental Support for MTHFR

Folate – natural folate, from leafy green plants (foliage – that’s how folate got its name!) and natural supplements will help to improve methylation. Especially important during the months prior to pregnancy, women of reproductive age with MTHFR mutations should be taking folate regularly.

Vitamin B6 – an essential cofactor in the methylation pathway, vitamin B6 helps to ensure folate works properly.

Vitamin B12 – vitamin B12 is a methyl donor – it contributes a methyl group to the methylation pathway, allowing it to function at optimal capacity. B12 should be taken in the methylcobalamin or hydroxycobalamin form, and never in the cyanocobalamin form.

Treatments for MTHFRTMG (Trimethylglycine or Betaine) – another methyl donor, providing three methyl groups to the methylation cycle, this nutrient is commonly deficient in people with MTHFR. Stress, infections, inflammation and high levels of heavy metals will all increase the demand for THM. In a healthy body, plenty is made, but it is also available as a supplement and in foods such as broccoli, beets and other vegetables. TMG is especially useful for people with depressive symptoms as it increases the production of SAMe.

SAMe – a consequence of poor MTHFR function is low levels of SAMe. Essential for the production of serotonin, low SAMe can be associated strongly with depression. SAMe acts as a methyl donor in the body, and is made in the body through methylation processes. Supplementation is available although often levels improve with supplementation of methyl donors, B12 and folate.

NAC (N-Acetyl Cysteine) – a direct precursor to the production of glutathione. NAC can be used to support detoxification and decrease oxidative damage in people with MTHFR mutations.

Confused? 

You’re not alone!  The study of genetics, and the influence of our genes on our health, is some pretty deep, dark science stuff!  But it’s also incredibly informative, and empowering.  And if you’ve ever wondered how your genes are impacting your health, you should consider genetic testing and working with a Naturopathic Doctor,  Geneticist or Functional Medicine Doctor who can help you understand your genetic tendencies, and realize your optimal health potential.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

MTHFR in Mental Health

MTHFR is an essential component of human health, one that you may not have heard of, but you likely will be hearing more about it in the future.

MTHFR is an acronym for a gene – methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase. This gene produces an enzyme essential for human health – methylenetetrahydrofolate (MTHF). It has been estimated that somewhere between 30-85% of humans carry a mutation, or SNP (single nucleotide polymorphism) in this gene. This can lead to minimal changes in the function of this gene, or significant changes that can drastically impact health. Our current best guess is that between 6-14% of caucasians, 2% of African descent, and up to 21% of Hispanics have a severe mutation.

MTHFR in Mental Health

One of the essential functions of MTHFR is to produce neurotransmitters. Individuals with MTHFR mutations may be more at risk of developing one of the many mental health conditions associated with MTHFR:

  • depression
  • bipolar disorder
  • attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD)
  • schizophrenia
  • autism
  • addiction
  • anxiety

The neurotransmitters produced during the MTHFR cycle, in particular serotonin, dopamine, norepinephrine and melatonin, have important mood stabilizing effects. The decreased function of the MTHFR cycle in people with a MTHFR mutation can lead to lower levels of these neurotransmitters, increasing the risk of developing a mental health condition.

MTHFR and Anti-Depressants

In addition to increasing the odds of developing a mental health condition, an MTHFR defect can also alter the ability of a person to respond to antidepressant medications. A higher rate of non-responsiveness and/or adverse effects has been found in people with an MTHFR mutation.

MTHFR Testing

If you suspect you may have an MTHFR defect the only way to know for sure is to do a genetic test that will identify if you have a mutation in this important gene at one of two locations – known as C667T or A1298C. If you have a single mutation in one location (inherited from one parent) you have a “heterozygous” mutation – if you have two mutations in one location (inherited from both parents) then you have a “homozygous” mutation, which is generally more severe. If you have two mutations in both locations then you have a “compound homozygous” mutation, the most severe.

What to do about MTHFR

The most important thing to do about MTHFR is to support the normal function of this enzyme pathway with essential nutrients. This pathway (methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase) produces folate as one of it’s primary actions. Folate, vitamin B9, can be taken as a supplement and reduce the negative effects seen with MTHFR mutations. Avoiding things that can interfere with folate is also important – digestive diseases, poor diet, alcohol consumption and some medications (include the birth control pill). Additionally, avoiding synthetic folic acid, found mostly in processed foods (like bread, crackers and cereals), is also important as the folic acid can slow down the MTHFR cycle further.

In addition to taking a folate supplement, focusing on a healthy diet is essential for managing MTHFR. Folate comes from foliage – so eating your leafy greens, broccoli and beans can provide folate in your daily diet.

Treating MTHFR can be complex. Working with a qualified practitioner, well-versed in MTHFR is essential to improve your health and support your mind and body.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Problems with the Pill

There is no doubt that the birth control pill was a huge player in the feminist revolution. First released in 1960, the pill allowed women to delay pregnancy and focus on their career, transforming the lives of women and society. While the pill may be a political powerhouse, and be effective at preventing pregnancy, my belief is that it is being overprescribed, and women are under-educated on the impact that the pill can have on their health.

This article will share some of the concerns that I, as a naturopathic doctor and women’s health expert, have regarding the pill. The purpose is not to convince you to give up the pill, but to empower you with information so that you can make an informed choice as to whether this medication is the right choice for you.

Problems with the Pill

  1. The Pill Depletes Nutrients

One of the biggest problems with the pill is the nutrient deficiencies that result from use. From B vitamins to essential minerals, the pill changes the absorption, utilization and metabolism of a number of different nutrients. These nutrient depletions are the underlying cause of many of the negative side effects of the pill – things like weight gain, moodiness, fatigue and blood clots. You can read all about the nutritional problems with the pill in this article.

  1. Weight gain

The estrogen in birth control pills can cause an increased appetite and fluid retention, leading to weight gain, especially in the first few months on the pill. Long term weight gain on the pill is more likely due to the decreased levels of B vitamins, necessary for carbohydrate and fat metabolism (i.e. burning fat for energy).

  1. No glory for our guts

The pill is known to alter the balance of healthy bacteria in our guts. Estrogen affects gut permeability (a risk factor for autoimmune disease) and bacteria balance, a condition known as dysbiosis. Healthy bacteria are incredibly important for our overall health – especially our immune, mood and digestive health. The pill has been linked to symptoms of gas, bloating, IBS, and an increased risk of Crohn’s disease in women with a family history of the digestive condition.

The change in healthy bacteria balance, combined with the estrogen in the pill, also makes women more susceptible to vaginal and digestive yeast infections. If you get frequent or recurrent yeast infections, or significant gas or bloating symptoms, consider if your pill may be part of the problem.

  1. Moodiness

Any woman can tell you that hormones can have a significant impact on your mood. The rises and dips in estrogen and progesterone that occur over a woman’s monthly cycle can lead to moods and behaviours that foster relationships, encourage sexual intimacy, and make women weepy, emotional and volatile. While some women on the pill notice very little difference in their mood states, other women find their normal emotional states become heightened in intensity and more difficult to manage. The reasons for this are very individual – some women don’t tolerate the high levels of estrogen and others find the high progesterone problematic. In either case, if the pill makes you moody switching to another pill is unlikely to help.

  1. Blood clots

Possibly the most well known side effect of the pill, the risk of blood clots is highest in women who are obese, are smokers or who have a family history of blood clots. The estrogen in the birth control pill is the most likely culprit, increasing the production of clotting factors and increasing a woman’s risk of blood clots by three-to-four fold. Deficiencies of key nutrients can also contribute to an increased risk of blood clots, most notably vitamin B6, vitamin E and magnesium – all of which are depleted by the pill.

  1. Thin endometrial lining

The endometrial (or uterine) lining is necessary for a successful implantation and pregnancy. In women wanting to have a family, long term use of oral birth control pills could thin the endometrial lining, leading to difficulty conceiving or maintaining a pregnancy. The underlying cause of this change is thought to be a down-regulation of estrogen receptors in the uterus, resulting from long term use of synthetic progesterone. The upside to this situation, is that this same mechanism is thought to be the reason why the pill reduces the risk of endometrial cancer.

  1. No sex drive

Never mind a thin endometrial lining if you can’t get up the urge to have sex at all. Many women report a low libido as a major issue they have with taking the pill. The pill lowers androgens and the lowered testosterone is likely responsible for the lack of sex drive. Around ovulation women typically experience a small, but significant, testosterone surge, causing them to seek out sex. On the pill you don’t experience this testosterone surge and your urge for sex can all but dry up. On a positive note – this decrease in testosterone is the reason why the pill can improve acne. But there are other ways to clear acne than giving up your lusty libido.

  1. Ignoring Mr. Right

Some of the most intriguing research on the pill surrounds a woman’s decision making around possible partners. Women who are on the pill tend to be attracted to more masculine, macho men with more ‘manly’ physical characteristics, and ignore men with softer, more ‘feminine’ features. Dr. Julie Holland, in her book Moody Bitches, refers to this as the “dad-or-cad” dilemma – women on the pill are more likely to be attracted to the bad-boy, rather than the more sensitive man who may be more acceptable as a long term partner and father to her children. Dr. Holland suggests it might be a good idea to get off the pill if you’re entering the dating pool, to prevent later regrets!

As if that wasn’t enough, another study found that women on the pill tend to seek out men with more genetic similarities to themselves, increasing their risk of miscarriage and genetic issues in their offspring. Women off the pill tend to choose men that are more genetically dissimilar – a pairing that tends to result in healthy pregnancies, happier relationships, more satisfying sex, and an increased likelihood of female orgasm.

  1. Masks symptoms

One of my biggest concerns with the pill is that it is used by conventional doctors as a band-aid for every female reproductive issue. Got PCOS? Take the pill! Got endometriosis? Take the pill! Got fibroids? Take the pill! PMS or menstrual cramps? Take the pill! Perimenopausal? You get the pill too! In no way does the pill address the underlying issues of these women’s health issues. The pill just provides a steady state of synthetic hormones, suppressing and masking the symptoms of the underlying imbalance. When you get off the pill you are no better than when you started – but you are older. And if you want to try and start a family you still have to address the underlying imbalance. The use of the pill as a way to suppress and deny the imbalances in women’s hormones is a disservice to women and I deplore it.

  1. The pill is a carcinogen

Ok. I get it, this sounds scary. But it’s true. The International Agency for Research on Cancer includes oral birth control pills as a carcinogen on its list of known human carcinogens. Studies have shown that birth control pills can increase the risk of breast cancer, cervical cancer and liver cancer. It can reduce your risk of ovarian and endometrial cancers, however. In general I’d suggest using the pill for as short a duration as possible and consider other forms of contraception for the majority of your reproductive years.

We have to keep in mind that the pill is not without problems. It contains synthetic hormones at levels much higher than our body produces on its own. Some of the side effects like acne, breast tenderness, or moodiness might be manageable, but I think women need to be empowered with knowledge to decide if the pill is the right choice for them.

If you have concerns about using the pill, want to balance your hormones naturally, or discuss natural forms of non-hormonal contraception, book an appointment now. Your hormones are in your hands – strive for hormone harmony!

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Nutritional Needs of Teens

There is a lot of growth during the teen years.  Emotional growth, intellectual growth, spiritual growth and, of course, physical growth.  All of this growing can be exhausting (this is one of the reasons teens need so much sleep!) It also means that nutritional needs are increased to support all this growth and change.

Teens need over 2 litres of water daily

The teen years are second only to pregnancy and lactation for high nutrient requirements.  The best way to ensure you are getting all of these nutrients is to eat a diverse diet high in different coloured fruits and vegetables, whole grains (such as brown rice, quinoa, barley, and millet), legumes and beans, lean meats (or alternatives) and low fat dairy (or alternatives).

Below are two charts on micronutrient (vitamins and minerals) and macronutrient (protein, carbohydrate, fats, water) nutritional needs.  Values given are daily requirements.

Micronutrient_Needs_Teens

*Vitamin D requirements are higher in Canada from October to May due to inadequate sun exposure during the winter.

**Any female who is sexually active should be taking an additional 400mcg daily to prevent birth defects if pregnancy occurs

Macronutrient_Needs_Teens

Remember: these reference values are for normal, apparently healthy individuals eating a mixed North American diet. An individual may have individual physiological, health, or lifestyle characteristics that may require different intakes of specific nutrients.

If you are concerned you are not getting enough nutrients in your diet consider a high quality multivitamin-mineral supplement to meet your needs.  It is better to take a supplement to meet your needs than to deprive your body of the building blocks it needs to grow and maintain health through your teens and beyond.

References:

Health Canada Dietary Reference Intake Tables.  Available online at: http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/reference/table/index-eng.php http://www.hc-sc.gc.ca/fn-an/nutrition/reference/table/index-eng.php

Low Testosterone in Men: Supportive Supplements

Many otherwise healthy men are suffering with low testosterone levels.  Testosterone is an important hormone for male sexual health, but also mood, energy, muscle strength, bone density and many many other functions in the body.

Testosterone levels decline with age, and men of this generation are producing up to one-quarter less than their grandfathers.

Symptoms of low testosterone are variable but may include:

  • Low libido
  • Erectile dysfunction
  • Depression and low mood
  • Brain fog and reduced mental functioning
  • Osteoporosis
  • Reduced muscle mass
  • Infertility and low sperm count

Low testosterone levels can be identified on blood or salivary panels. If you think you may have low testosterone, ask your doctor for a test.

You can learn about lifestyle approaches to improving low testosterone levels here, or read on to learn how specific nutritional and botanical supplements can increase your testosterone and get you back to feeling vibrantly healthy.

Nutritional Supplements

Zinc

The most important nutrient for male health, even a slight deficiency in zinc can lead to lower testosterone levels and decrease sperm counts. It is estimated that 80% of men are not getting the daily recommended intake of zinc (11mg). Good food sources are nuts, pumpkin seeds and whole grains. Take supplements only under the care of a qualified naturopathic doctor – taking too much zinc can be toxic to sperm and result in infertility. Taking zinc with folic acid has also been shown to be more effective at balancing hormones and sperm production than either alone.

Astaxanthin

This carotenoid molecule (less well-known than it’s cousin beta carotene), is isolated from algae.  Astaxanthin has been found to increase testosterone levels and sperm health after three months of supplementation. It has stellar antioxidant properties and is safe for most men.

Botanical Supplements

Mucuna pruriens

A traditional Ayurvedic herb, mucuna is able to balance the entire cascade of male hormone balance from the production of GnRH in the hypothalamus all the way to testosterone production in the testes. Human and animal studies have shown increases in sperm count and increased testosterone. It also has been found to decrease reports of stress and decreased stress hormone (cortisol) production.

Tongkat Ali

Eurycoma longifolia Jack, or Tongkat Ali, is a traditional Malaysian botanical medicine. We don’t know exactly how it works, but studies have demonstrated increases in hormones, including testosterone as well as increased libido and sperm count.

Withania somnifera

Ashwaganda, an excellent adaptogenic botanical, has been found in studies to improve sperm counts, hormone balance and testosterone levels. This botanical is best indicated for men with stress in addition to low testosterone levels.

Tribulus terrestris

A botanical with a long history of use for improving male virility, muscle strength and sexual potency. Tribulus is thought to enhance production of lutenizing hormone, leading to an increase in testosterone production. Studies have found daily supplementation can improve hormone parameters after as little as one month.

As with all supplements, supervision by an experienced and qualified Naturopathic Doctor is recommended to ensure safe and effective use.  Natural remedies may be natural, but they are not without side effects and potential interactions.  Your ND will help you find your ideal balance.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Naturopathic Medicine and Endometriosis

Endometriosis is a chronic condition affecting millions of Canadian women. It can begin at any age between the teens and 40s and impacts between 10-15% of women in these age groups.

There is no cure for endometriosis, but Naturopathic Medicine can offer women with this condition hope for improved hormone balance, decreased pain and support for fertility.

Prior to reading this article, I suggest you check out Understanding Endometriosis to learn how to recognize the symptoms of endometriosis and the underlying imbalances that lead to this frustrating condition.

Naturopathic Treatments for Endometriosis

A Naturopathic treatment plan for endometriosis will be highly individualized to each person, addressing their unique lifestyle, dietary and symptom needs. The treatment goals vary person to person, but always include a combination of the following:

  • Normalize the function of the immune system
  • Balance hormones
  • Support liver detoxification of hormones
  • Reduce and block pro-inflammatory chemicals produced by the body
  • Support the large intestine and microbiome (healthy bacteria)
  • Decrease stress

Vitamin CBy addressing these underlying imbalances in endometriosis Naturopathic Doctors can improve the overall health of women with endometriosis, decrease or eliminate symptoms of endometriosis and address the underlying cause of endometriosis.

Normalize Immune Function

There are many nutrients involved in healthy immune function. One of the largest categories of immune supportive nutrients are the antioxidants. Nutrients like vitamin C, beta carotene, vitamin E and selenium all enhance immune function and can be used to support endometriosis treatment. Many of these nutrients also decrease inflammation and can improve pain associated with endometriosis.

Vitamin D, an incredibly important nutrient for Canadians, has profound impacts on endometriosis. Vitamin D regulates cell growth and differentiation in endometriosis, enhances macrophage action and decreases inflammation. Vitamin D supplementation has been found in studies to reduce the weight of endometriosis lesions as well.

Balance Hormones

hormone balanceEndometriosis is a hormonally responsive condition – the growth of the endometrial lesions occurs under the influence of estrogen – so balancing hormone levels is an important treatment goal for all women with endometriosis.

Phytoestrogens, such as lentils, flax seeds and soy, can bind to estrogen receptors and have a less potent effect than our body’s own estrogen. When these phytoestrogens are bound to receptors they displace our own estrogen resulting in a lower estrogen effect overall. These foods should be incorporated into our diet daily for optimal hormone balancing effects.

Indole-3-carbinole and DIM (di-indolylmethane) from brassica vegetables are also estrogen regulating supplements that act much like phytoestrogens by binding estrogen receptors and decreasing our body’s estrogen response. Your Naturopathic Doctor may recommend these supplements, or recommend increasing consumption of broccoli, cauliflower, cabbage and brussels sprouts for hormone balancing in endometriosis.

Reduce Inflammation

Grapes are a source of resveratrolMany of the most profoundly effective treatments for endometriosis work by reducing inflammation in the body. Pycnogenol, a pine bark extract, has anti-inflammatory, immune supportive and anti-growth properties. Studies have shown significant improvements in pain symptoms in women using pycnogenol.

Resveratrol, a substance found in the skin of grapes, is especially beneficial for women with endometriosis and infertility. Resveratrol can decrease inflammation, reduce proliferation of endometrial lesions and protect eggs from the effects of aging.

N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) is one of the most promising treatments for endometriosis. Studies have found immune function improvements (increases in T regulatory cells, decreases in TNF-alpha), significant decreases in inflammation (including increases in glutathione – a cellular anti-inflammatory) as well as reduces in the size of existing endometrial lesions.

Support Liver Detoxification

The liver is essential for hormone balance as it is where our body detoxifies estrogen and prepares it for elimination. B vitamins are necessary for this function, allowing the liver to more efficiently inactivate and process estrogen.

Nutrients known as lipotropics also promote liver function by promoting the flow of fat and bile (containing estrogen for elimination) out of the body through the large intestines. Choline, betaine, methionine and dandelion are all prime examples of lipotropics that can be used to enhance liver detoxification in endometriosis.

oatmealSupport Large Intestines and Healthy Bacteria

Our body eliminates estrogen by attaching it to a carrier molecule (glucuronic acid) and excreting it through the bile into the stool. Unfriendly bacteria in the large intestines can prevent our ability to eliminate estrogen by breaking this bond between estrogen and it’s carrier. This estrogen is then recycled back into our body, resulting in higher circulating levels of estrogen.

We can modify this action, and support healthy hormone levels, by following the Endometriosis Diet which emphasizes healthy fiber and avoidance of unhealthy fats. Probiotic supplements can also be used in some cases to encourage healthy bacteria balance.

Decrease Stress

Stress occurs frequently in our fast-paced society, but we know that unhealthy levels of stress, or poor adaptation to stress is linked to decreased immune function and may trigger the kind of biochemical imbalances that lead to endometriosis. Studies have demonstrated that endometriosis grows more rapidly, or recurs faster and in greater quantities, during times of extreme emotional stress.

Breathing exercises, physical exercise, yoga, meditation, mindfulness, good quality sleep and adaptogenic herbs and supplements can decrease your stress response and help you to manage your endometriosis, naturally.

Not All Nutrients Are Beneficial

Just because it’s natural, does not mean it’s safe. It is strongly recommended to consult with a Naturopathic Doctor to develop a safe and effective endometriosis plan that will address your concerns and give you the best chances for success.

Additionally, some nutrients may negatively impact endometriosis. L-carnitine, an amino acid, was shown in one study to induce a condition resembling endometriosis with accompanying infertility when give to young female mice. We are not sure of the impact this may have on humans, but a cautious approach is recommended.

Treating Endometriosis

Understanding EndometriosisTo take a fully empowered, knowledgeable approach to your endometriosis I recommend you read the other articles written by Dr. Lisa Watson, ND on endometriosis: Understanding Endometriosis, The Endometriosis Diet, Endometriosis and the Immune System, Acupuncture and Endometriosis and Endometriosis and Infertility.  If you are ready to take the next step, book a complimentary 15 minute meet-and-greet appointment with Dr. Watson, or book an initial consultation.  You can feel better! Get started now.

References

Hudson, Tori. Women’s Encyclopedia of Natural Medicine. New York: McGraw Hill, 2008.

Lauersen, Niels H and Bouchez, Collette. Getting Pregnant. New York: Fireside, 2000.

Lewis, Randine. The Infertility Cure. New York: Little, Brown and Company, 2004.

Kohama T, et al. Effect of French maritime pine bark extract on endometriosis as compared with leuprorelin acetate. Journal of Reproductive Medicine; 2007:52(8),703-8

Vassiliadis S, Athanassakis I. A “conditionally essential” nutrient, L-carnitine, as a primary suspect in endometriosis. Fertil Steril. 2011 Jun 30;95(8):2759-60.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

A Male Prenatal?

We all recognize the importance of prenatal supplements for women.  But can men benefit too?  Women are encouraged to take a nutritional supplement for at least three months before getting pregnant and I think men should do the same!

Nutrients for Male Fertility

Certain nutrients are needed for the production and protection of sperm.  Making sure that men have enough of these key nutrients can improve sperm count, sperm motility and the percentage of healthy sperm.

Vitamin C and E

Antioxidants for male fertilityVitamins C and E are antioxidants – they protect the body from damage done by reactive oxygen species (ROS or ‘free radicals’).  Sperm are especially sensitive to damage by ROS.  This is why semen contains high amounts of vitamin C and other antioxidants, to protect the sperm from ROS damage.

A diet that is deficient in antioxidant rich fruits and vegetables can lead to lower sperm count, poor motility and more abnormally shaped sperm.

However, you can get too much of a good thing.  Excess doses of vitamin C and E can have pro-oxidant effects – leading to oxidative damage rather than preventing it.  Working with a Naturopathic Doctor can help you determine your optimum dose for fertility.

Selenium

Supplements for Male Fertility

Another antioxidant, selenium deficiency is associated with poor male fertility.  Selenium supports sperm production and supplementation can improve sperm motility and sperm count.

As with vitamin C and E, too much selenium can cause adverse effects.  It is best used in combination with other antioxidants at low dose, or as a food-based nutrient.              

Folic acid

Normally associated with female fertility, men can benefit from folic acid supplementation as well.  Folic acid is necessary for DNA synthesis and the protection of DNA during sperm production.

It has been suggested that supplementing men with folic acid may decrease miscarriage rate by decreasing genetic mutations.

Zinc

No single nutrient has a greater impact on male reproduction than zinc.  Zinc is necessary for folic acid absorption and metabolism, testosterone production, formation and maturation of sperm and fertilization.

The scary thing is that 79% of men are not consuming even the recommended daily allowance (RDA) of zinc.  Most men who are considering fatherhood could benefit from a zinc supplement.

But as with so many things, you can have too much of a good thing.  Excess intake of trace minerals like zinc can lead to pro-oxidant effects.

Men and women contribute equally to fertility – you each give your DNA to your baby.  Put your best DNA forward and consider seeing a Naturopathic Doctor who can recommend a male prenatal supplement to optimize your fertility, and the health of the next generation.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.