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Going Grey

Purple, blue, red, pink – bright vibrant hair colours are all the rage these days!  But grey?  Is anyone really excited to see those grey hairs popping up?  Why are they there, and what can we do about it?  The answers may surprise you.

Aging Grey

Our hair follicles contain cells that make pigment, called melanin.  This melanin gives your hair its distinct colour.  As we age, these pigment cells start to die off and new hairs grow in lighter – in an array of shades from grey to silver and white.  Once that pigment cell is dead, it won’t come back – the hairs growing from that follicle will never be coloured again. 

And aging is inevitable.  Dermatologists often quote the 50-50-50 Rule – 50% of the population will be 50% grey by 50 years of age.  However, it differs for everyone.  It seems that white people tend to start going grey in their 30s, Asians in their late 30s and black people in their mid-40s. 

Grandma Was Great, and Grey

But it’s mostly your genes that determine how early you go grey – and how quickly!  (Thanks Mum.)  If your parents went grey early, it’s more likely that you will too.

Premature Greying

Genetic or otherwise, premature greying happens.  If you go grey 10 years earlier than the average person does, feel free to complain about it!  You can consider it premature if your hair is going grey before:

  • 20 years old if you’re white
  • 25 years old if you’re Asian
  • 30 years old if you’re black

Contributing to the Grey

There are health concerns that can contribute to grey hair.  If you’re convinced it’s not all in your genes, look at these factors to see if they are adding to your silver streaks.

  1. Lack of vitamin B12 – common in vegans and vegetarians
  2. Vitamin D deficiency – common in northern climates, especially during the winter months
  3. Low calcium – from poor intake or a parathyroid dysfunction, low levels are associated with premature greying
  4. Low iron levels – more common in women and vegans and vegetarians, low levels can contribute to greying and to hair loss
  5. Thyroid hormone imbalance – more common in women, impacting up to 1 in 6 women
  6. Vitiligo – an autoimmune disease that destroys pigment making cells
  7. Copper imbalance – copper can boost the production of melanin, the compound that gives hair its colour.  But don’t just start taking it – copper needs to be carefully balanced with zinc or it can cause mood swings, depression and anxiety.
  8. Smoking – smokers are much more likely to go grey before 30 years of age – 2 ½ times more likely!

What To Do About Grey Hair

Dye it or don’t, but whatever you do don’t pluck it!  Or at least don’t make a habit of it!  Repeatedly plucking hairs can damage the hair follicle and result in kinkier, less healthy hair growing in. 

Hair is made mostly of protein, so foods that are high in proteins are essential for healthy hair.  Nutrients like iron, calcium, zinc, vitamin D, omega 3 fatty acids, B12 and B6 have also been found to support hair health.  Some vegetarians and vegans, and people with digestive issues, may have difficulty getting enough of these from their food and might want to look at taking targeted supplements. 

Eating every 4-5 hours may also help to support hair health.  Hair is not considered an essential tissue by the body, and research suggests that if we go too long between meals the energy available to non-essential tissues could be reduced and could impact hair health. 

Consider having your nutrient levels tested to see if they are negatively impacting your healthy hair. And meet with a Naturopathic Doctor to discuss your diet if you feel like it could use a boost as well!

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Hormones and Hair Loss

One of my favourite/ least favourite stories to tell is how I became a Naturopathic Doctor.  I was in my late teens, finishing my last year of high school, when I began losing my hair.  What was happening to my thick full hair?? It was falling out more and more, but my doctors assured me I “still had lots of hair”, as if that was what mattered.  I was not taken seriously – whether because I was a teen girl, or because my doctors didn’t see how much hair I was losing every day, it didn’t matter.  My hair loss was destroying my self confidence and I was convinced it meant something was wrong.

A Familiar Story

Of course, it did mean something was wrong.  For myself, it was a combination of low iron (which I talk about as a root cause of hair loss) and significant stress.  And this loss of trust in the conventional medical community led me to change my plans from becoming a Medical Doctor to becoming a Naturopathic Doctor.

I’d like to think my story is unique.  But I’ve come to see that it is not.  Many women (and teen girls) come to my practice with similar stories.  Being dismissed and told that their hair loss is not a significant symptom.  Being told that it is normal.  Or having little to no testing done to identify the underlying cause of hair loss. 

I may not be able to help all of the millions of women who experience hair loss, but I hope by sharing my story, and some of my expertise, that I may be able to impact some. 

Hormones and Hair Loss

Hair loss can happen to a woman at any age, and while it may be more common as we get older, that doesn’t mean that it is a normal occurrence at any age.  Keep in mind – common is not the same as normal!  In this article I’m going to focus on the hormonal causes of hair loss, some of the most common causes I see in my practice.  In order to properly diagnose your hair loss, be sure to use the Hair Loss Lab Testing Checklist and get to the root cause. 

Thyroid Imbalances

Your thyroid is a small but mighty gland located in your neck, near your voice box.  The primary role of the thyroid is to encourage energy production by the body.  When the thyroid isn’t functioning optimally, there can be consequences throughout the body, including the hair.  Hair loss can occur with too little thyroid hormone (hypothyroidism) or too much (hyperthyroidism).  A condition known as alopecia areata is also linked to autoimmune thyroid disease, or Hashimoto’s thyroiditis

Conventional testing for thyroid function is not always adequate to identify an underlying thyroid condition.  If you suspect your thyroid may be contributing to your hair loss, get a comprehensive thyroid panel completed with your Naturopathic Doctor, functional medicine doctor or MD.  This test will look beyond TSH and test for free T3, free T4 and thyroid antibodies. 

Testosterone Overload

One of the most common causes of hair loss in women and men, high levels of testosterone can lead to hair loss, especially at the frontal hairline and the top of the head.  While typically thought of as a man’s hormone, women produce testosterone as well.  The real issue isn’t testosterone specifically, but a metabolite of testosterone called dihydrotestosterone, or DHT.  This form of testosterone is much more powerful than regular testosterone and binds strongly to hair follicles on the scalp, face, back and chest – leading to hair loss on the scalp, and acne on the face, back and chest. 

Many women can have lab testing for testosterone that looks normal, but DHT levels may still be high.  It is important to have both these hormones tested, especially if you have other signs of high androgens such as acne or irregular periods, or have been diagnosed with PCOS

Low Progesterone

Progesterone is a damn important hormone.  The natural balancer to both estrogen and testosterone, many hormonal imbalances are a result of low progesterone.  Progesterone is able to block testosterone from accessing receptors, preventing it from leading to hair loss.  Progesterone is also the reason women’s hair grows so thick and healthy during pregnancy! 

The three times in a woman’s life when low progesterone are most common are:

  1. If she is using the birth control pill.  On the pill you do not ovulate, and do not produce progesterone (the synthetic progestins in the pill are not the same thing)
  2. If she has PCOS and does not ovulate
  3. As she ages.  Progesterone production drops through your 30s and many women in their 40s are not making enough to balance their estrogen and testosterone levels.  Women in menopause make hardly any progesterone at all. 

Stress is another common cause of progesterone deficiency, as the body will steal all the available progesterone to make cortisol, our body’s main stress hormone. 

Insulin and Blood Sugar Imbalances

No hormone acts on the body in isolation.  They all influence each other.  Insulin, the hormone produced to encourage our cells to take up sugar and regulate the levels of sugar in our blood, can have an impact on hair loss when it is imbalanced.

When your diet is too high in refined or processed carbohydrates, your cells can become resistant to insulin, causing higher circulating levels of blood sugar.  When this occurs your ovaries can become resistant as well, an imbalance which disrupts healthy ovulation and causes your ovaries to produce more testosterone and DHT. 

Stress and Cortisol

You may pull your hair out when you are stressed, or stress may cause it to fall out.  Stress can cause increased or decreased cortisol levels, both of which can contribute to hair loss.  Excessive stress can also cause your hair to enter its telogen, or hair fall phase, prematurely.  This will often result in hair loss 2-3 months after the stressful event. 

High cortisol will also deplete progesterone and allow for more testosterone to bind to hair follicles, which can further exacerbate hair loss.  If you have significant stress, consider what changes need to be made to help lessen your stress, and explore whether cortisol testing may help to reverse and resolve your hair loss.

Stopping Hair Loss

Understanding the hormonal causes of hair loss for women is just the first step.  To get to the root cause of your hair loss comprehensive testing is almost always necessary.  The problem is that many doctors don’t take hair loss seriously (I know from my personal experience!).  You may need to pay out of pocket to get the level of testing that you need, but in the end, that knowledge can help you put an end to your hair loss and allow you to regain not only your hair, but balance your hormones and give you your quality of life back.

Selected References

Ohnemus U, Uenalan M, Inzunza J, Gustafsson JA, Paus R. The hair follicle as an estrogen target and source. Endoc Rev. 206;27(6):677-706. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16877675

Ohnemus U, Uenalan M, Inzunza J, Gustafsson JA, Paus R. The hair follicle as an estrogen target and source. Endoc Rev. 206;27(6):677-706. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16877675

Randall VA. Androgens and hair growth. Dermatol Ther. 2008;21(5):314-28. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18844710

Randall VA. Hormonal regulation of hair follicles exhibits a biological paradox. Semin Cell Dev Biol. 2007;18(2):274-85. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17379547

Levy LL, Emer JJ. Female pattern alopecia: current perspectives. Int J Womens Health. 2013;5:541-556. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3769411/

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem. 

Sasquatches and Hair Loss: Supernatural Health Series

As a doctor in Canada I try to be very sensitive to the health concerns of my fellow Canadians.  Issues like high rates of autoimmune disease and multiple sclerosis, vitamin D deficiencies in the vast majority of individuals, and soaring rates of diabetes and heart disease are those I address in my practice every day.  And as a Canadian I also care about our supernatural community, most notably the Sasquatch.

Sasquatches (sometimes known as “Bigfoot” based on the most commonly found evidence of their existence), are native to the Pacific coast of North America, mostly through the Rocky Mountains of British Columbia, Oregon and Washington state.  Population counts vary as the Sasquatch are notoriously a secretive race.

Hair Loss in Sasquatches

One condition that is known to be distressing to Sasquatches is hair loss.  As Sasquatches do not use clothing they rely on their full body hair for warmth during the long northern winters.

Hair loss can have many different causes in both humans and Sasquatches.  I have highlighted a few of the most common below:

  1. Aging – hair loss is a normal process of aging. By 40 years of age, human hair growth slows, and it may be the same for the Sasquatch.  New hairs are not replaced as quickly as old ones are lost.  This will impact both male and female Sasquatches, however males may have more prominent hair loss due to the impacts of testosterone.
  2. Hormones – hormones, like testosterone and other androgens (“male hormones”) can contribute to hair loss in men, women and Sasquatches. The hair loss patterns in androgen associated hair loss are often easy to identify.  If you see a male Sasquatch with a receding hairline, or with loss from the top of their head, they should consider having their hormone levels tested.  If you see a female Sasquatch with all over hair thinning or with more hair on her chin or upper lip, suggest she have her hormone levels looked at.
  3. Low thyroid function – with up to 1 in 5 human adults experiencing low thyroid function it may be possible that rates are equally high in Sasquatches. Low thyroid function can lead to diffuse, all over hair loss, or in some cases patches of total hair loss (alopecia areata.)
  4. Celiac disease – another condition often associated with alopecia areata, celiac disease occurs when consumption of gluten (wheat, barley, rye) damages the small intestines and causes systemic symptoms by creating antibodies that attack various cells in the body, including hair follicles. The only treatment for the Sasquatch with celiac disease is total avoidance of gluten containing grains – which is not typically a staple in the Sasquatch diet.
  5. Nutritional deficiencies – depending on the diet of the Sasquatch, they may be prone to nutrient deficiencies that are contributing to hair loss. Just about any nutrient deficiency can lead to hair loss but some of the most common include iron, vitamin A, zinc and essential fatty acids.

Help for Hair Loss in Sasquatches

Just as with my human patients, I encourage any supernatural being, Sasquatch or other, to seek comprehensive testing when they experience hair loss.  Many doctors do not adequately assess for the many different conditions that can lead to hair loss, leaving people (and Sasquatches) frustrated and feeling like there are no answers.  But most cases of hair loss have an identifiable root cause, and once that is addressed even the most hopeless Sasquatch can regain hope, and potentially a full body of healthy hair.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes by the supernatural community. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed monster doctor. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor, Dr. Frankenstein, or other primary care provider is recommended for any supernatural being suffering from a health problem.

DUTCH test, hormone testing,hormone test, women's hormones, hormone health

DUTCH: Gold Standard in Hormone Testing

In my work with women’s health and hormones, one of the biggest areas of debate is hormone testing. Women are confused about when and how to test their hormones, and if I’m honest, a lot of doctors are confused as well. Which is leaving women under-diagnosed and under-treated for their very real (and very annoying) hormone imbalances.

But no more. Science has come a long way and right now we have the ability to test for hormones in ways that we never have been able to before. And women everywhere can benefit. So if you’ve ever wondered, “Do I have a hormone imbalance?”, now we can easily answer that question.

The DUTCH Test

Hormone testing with the DUTCH testDUTCH is an acronym that stands for Dried Urine Test for Comprehensive Hormones. It is a simple, but sophisticated test that looks not just at your hormones, but how your body processes and metabolizes them.

The DUTCH test looks not just at your reproductive hormones (although it does look at those quite thoroughly), but it also looks at your stress hormones, your androgens (male pattern hormones), your melatonin and the new DUTCH test also looks at organic acids – markers for mood and nutritional balance in the body.

8 Reasons the DUTCH Test is the Gold Standard for Hormone Testing

  1. Simple collection

Nothing is easier than peeing on a piece of filter paper. (Ok… some people might get a little pee on themselves, but still… is that the worst thing that can happen to you today?)

  1. In depth hormone levels

If you have a question about your hormones, the answer is likely to be found in the DUTCH test. While your Naturopathic Doctor may still recommend blood testing for hormones like thyroid hormone, FSH or LH, just about every other hormone is covered in the DUTCH test.

  1. Metabolism matters

Hands down, the reason the DUTCH test is the best, is that it measures metabolites. The absolute level of your hormones matter – but what can matter more is what your body does with those hormones. This is metabolism – does your body turn testosterone into nasty acne-promoting 5a-DHT?? Does your body turn estradiol into DNA damaging 4-OH estrone? Are you healthfully metabolizing and eliminating estrogen from your body? The DUTCH test can tell you.

  1. It’s all about those curves

Not every hormone has stable levels over the entire day. In particular, our primary stress hormone, cortisol, and its metabolite cortisone, have a curve that changes over the course of the day. Blood tests only give us a single snapshot of your cortisol levels, but the dried urine test gives us not only the total levels of cortisol and cortisone, but also the curve – how those levels change over the day. This is some VALUABLE information for people who are struggling with stress, fatigue, anxiety, decreased libido, trouble sleeping and insomnia.

  1. Balanced estrogen

Estrogen is one of the most important hormones in our bodies, and it has so many benefits for our health, but it can also have negative impacts if it is not in balance.

Typical hormone testing for estrogen looks just at estradiol, the dominant estrogen in the body. But that only tells us such a small bit of information. If we want to balance our estrogen, and prevent complications of estrogen dominance, then we want to understand how our body copes with our burden of estrogen. What metabolism pathways does our body use? Are those the best pathways?

If you are considering bioidentical hormones (BHRT) for perimenopause, or menopause symptoms, then the DUTCH test is highly recommended at the initial visit to understand how you will metabolize the hormones.

  1. Androgens and acne and hair health

In my work with women, no one condition is more loathed or baffling than acne. WTF, am I right ladies? How did we reach our 30s and still have to deal with acne?? Often it’s an issue of androgen metabolism. But typical hormone testing just looks at the amount of testosterone being made, and not what your body is doing with it. If your body is sending more testosterone towards the DHT metabolites, you will have more acne and possibly hair loss (and chin/ upper lip hair growth!) The DUTCH test will tell you if this is happening – and then we can talk about what to do about it!

  1. Melatonin

If you are having difficulty sleeping, knowing your melatonin levels is amazing information to have. But not only those with insomnia or sleep challenges should know their melatonin levels. Melatonin is also a powerful antioxidant in our bodies, and optimal levels of melatonin have been found to reduce the incidence of hormonal cancers (including breast cancer). No other hormone test looks at melatonin, but the DUTCH test does.

  1. Organic acids

Natural treatments and testing for depression and anxietyA new addition in 2018 to the DUTCH test is the 6 OAT (organic acid tests). I’m so excited for this new information!

Three new markers for neurotransmitters – to help us understand your mood. If you struggle with depression, anxiety or insomnia, this information can be very significant. If you have tried antidepressants without benefit, your organic acid markers for specific neurotransmitters, like serotonin, may tell you why.

Additionally there are three new markers for nutritional levels – looking at your B6 and B12 metabolism as well as your glutathione status. If you are concerned about weight gain or inflammation as part of your hormone imbalance, now we may be able to identify why.

The 1 Reason I don’t love DUTCH Testing

  1. The test results are ugly

I know. Such an aesthetic issue. But the test results are ugly – seriously. The results are clear. The information is valuable. But the results look a lot like a airplane dashboard, and some patients find this overwhelming. So take the time to talk through the results with your ND to understand what they mean for you.

Toronto, naturopath, doctor, naturopathic doctor, holistic, functional doctor

Next Steps

If you are interested in DUTCH testing, I suggest booking a 15 minute complimentary meet and greet to discuss the details. It is an amazing, useful, sophisticated test. But it’s not the right test for everyone. So let’s talk and see if it is the right test for you.

Dr. Lisa

Further Reading

https://dutchtest.com

https://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2016/05/08/dutch-hormone-test.aspx

 

Female Hair Loss: Lab Testing

My expertise in treating hair loss in women started with a personal experience of hair loss in my 20s. After being dismissed by my Medical Doctor who assured me it was “totally normal” I persisted in understanding why a healthy woman in her 20s would start losing hair.

Laboratory Testing for Female Hair Loss

As I discuss in my article, Getting to the Root of Female Hair Loss, treating hair loss can only be effective if you understand the root cause – why is a woman losing hair? Through laboratory testing an answer can often be found.

When I am working with women with hair loss I generally advocate for a tiered approach to lab testing for hair loss – starting with the most likely causes and progressing to the more complex.

For myself, the issue was an iron deficiency. By correcting that iron deficiency I was able to resolve my hair loss in under a year and it hasn’t recurred since.

Use the checklist below with your Medical Doctor or Naturopathic Doctor to determine the root cause of your hair loss. And if you’re ready to work with someone experienced in hair loss in women, get in touch and book an appointment today.

Female Hair Loss – Printable PDF

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Alopecia Areata – The Naturopathic Approach

Hair loss can be a devastating symptom for men and women alike.  When it happens during adolescence or young adulthood it can be even more so.  Alopecia areata, a type of hair loss that affects up to 0.2% of the population (that’s over 50 000 people in Toronto alone) most often starts in people under 20 years of age.

Men and women suffer equally from alopecia areata and it occurs in all ethnic groups.  While we don’t know exactly what causes alopecia areata the evidence suggests it is an autoimmune condition with genetics and environmental factors contributing to its onset.

DIAGNOSIS of ALOPECIA AREATA

Alopecia areata has a characteristic appearance of well-defined round or oval areas of hair loss.  Typically occurring on the scalp, the circular patches of hair loss are free from scarring and the skin is not discoloured.  Around the patch of hair loss some hairs will have an “exclamation point” appearance showing signs of the abnormal transition of the hair through it’s growth phase.

While alopecia areata usually occurs as defined patches on the scalp, alopecia totalis occurs when there is  total loss of the scalp hair and alopecia universalis refers to loss of all hair on the scalp and body.

Diagnosis of alopecia areata should consist of a detailed history, a thorough clinical examination and appropriate laboratory testing.   Markers of inflammation and nutritional status should be included in any blood work to identify potential contributing factors in the onset and development of alopecia areata.

TREATMENT of ALOPECIA AREATA

Treatment of alopecia areata is difficult to assess because spontaneous recovery and hair regrowth occurs within 6 to 12 months for more than half of all patients.  However, recurrence is high so efforts should be made to determine the underlying cause of alopecia areata and treat accordingly.

While many things can contribute to the development of alopecia areata research suggests that some of the most significant factors are:

  • Stress (physical or emotional)
  • Hormone fluctuations
  • Infectious diseases or illnesses
  • Autoimmune conditions
  • Pre-existing health conditions such as celiac disease, ulcerative colitis, psoriasis, multiple sclerosis, vitiligo and lupus
  • Nutritional deficiencies – especially zinc and iron

crisp bread
Seeds are a good source of zinc.

As a Naturopathic Doctor my focus is on uncovering potential imbalances that may be contributing to the development of disease.  With alopecia areata there are often multiple factors that must be addressed – nutrient deficient diets, stress, poor immune function and hormone imbalances being the most common.

Potential natural treatments depend on individual needs – unfortunately there is no one diet or supplement that can cure alopecia areata.  The best course of action is to understand your health – what are the potential causes of your hair loss and how can they be addressed through dietary, nutritional and supplemental support.

To learn more about my individualized approach to hair loss, book a complimentary 15 minute meet-and-greet.  Learn how you can improve your health today.

References:

  1. Shapiro J. Hair Loss in Women. N Engl J Med. 2007;357:1620-1630.
  2. Springer K, Brown M, Stulberg DL. Common hair loss disorders. Am Fam Physician. 2003;68(1):93-102.
  3. Tosti A. Diseases of hair and nails. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI eds. Goldman’s Cecil Medicine. 24th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Mosby Elsevier; 2012:chap 450.
  4. Alkhalifah A, Alsantali A, Wang E, McElwee KJ, Shapiro J. Alopecia areata update part I. Clinical picture, histopathology and pathogenesis. J Am Acad Dermatol. 2010;62(2):177-188.
  5. Brajac I, Tkalcic M, Dragojevic DM, Gruber F. Roles of stress, stress perception and trait-anxiety in the onset and course of alopecia areata. J Dermatol 2003;30:871-878.
  6. Harries MJ, Sun J, Paus R, King LE Jr. Management of alopecia areata. BMJ. 2010;341:c3671.
  7. Rushton DH. Nutritional factors and hair loss.  Clin Exp Dermatol. 2002;27(5):396-404. Trost LB, Bergfeld WF, Calogeras E. The diagnosis and treatment of iron deficiency and its potential relationship to hair loss.  J Am Acad Dermatol. 2006;54(5):824-844.
  8. Park H, Woo Kim C, Seok Kim S, Wook Park C.  The therapeutic effect and the changed serum zinc level after zinc supplementation in alopecia areata patients who had a low serum zinc level. Ann Dermatol. 2009;21(2)142-146.

 

Getting to the Root of Female Hair Loss

Hair loss is a condition affecting many adults – both men and women.  Women are more likely to question why they are experiencing hair loss and may be more negatively affected by the hair loss than men.  Women with hair loss report lower self esteem and often have higher levels of fear, stress, depression and anxiety.

Conventional medicine is often dismissive of female hair loss.  The hair loss is most often not severe alopecia (the medical term for hair loss) and it is often diffuse (scattered over the scalp).

So why are women in their 20s, 30s, and 40s experiencing hair loss?  There are a number of potential causes.  By addressing the root cause of the hair loss, many women are able to stop the hair loss and in some instances, reverse it.

Aging

Unfortunately, hair loss is a normal part of aging.  By the age of 40, the rate of hair growth slows down.  New hairs are not replaced as quickly as old ones are lost.  This age-related hair loss affects both men and women.  In men the hair loss can be more prominent due to the effects of androgens (male sex hormones – such as testosterone).

Androgens

Androgens can contribute to hair loss in women just like in men.  It has been known since the time of Hippocrates that male sex hormones (androgens) contribute to hair loss.  This androgen-related hair loss is very common in women.  A report published in the Clinical Dermatology journal states that it affects approximately 30% of women before age 50.   When it occurs in women it is often referred to as “female pattern hair loss”.

There are a number of reasons why a woman may be affected by androgen-related hair loss.  Genetics, excess androgens, insulin resistance, diabetes, polycystic ovarian syndrome, and low antioxidant status are all associated with female pattern hair loss.

Drug-Induced Hair Loss

A long list of pharmaceutical drugs can cause hair loss.  Some of the most common ones are:

  • Medications_hair loss
    Many common medications can contribute to female hair loss

    Antibiotics

  • Anticoagulants (Coumadin, heparin)
  • Antidepressants (Prozac, lithium)
  • Antiepileptics (Valproic acid, Dilantin)
  • Cardiovascular drugs (ACE inhibitors, beta-blockers)
  • Chemotherapy drugs
  • Endocrine drugs (Clomid, danazol)
  • Gout medications (Colchicine, allopurinol)
  • Lipid-lowering drugs
  • Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (Ibuprofen, naproxen)
  • Ulcer medications (Zantac, tagamet)

When possible, natural alternatives to these drugs should be considered if hair loss is occurring.

Nutritional Deficiencies

A deficiency of almost any essential nutrient can lead to hair loss.  A Naturopathic Doctor can assess your overall nutrient status, but there are a few signs you can look for at home.

Zinc – white lines on the nail can indicate poor wound healing, a common sign of low zinc levels.

Vitamin A – bumps on the back of the arms (called hyperkeratosis) is a common sign of vitamin A deficiency.

Essential Fatty Acids dry skin on the elbows and other parts of the body is a common sign of low essential fatty acid levels.

Another nutrient deficiencies that may lead to hair loss is iron.  A simple blood test is needed to determine iron levels.  Your Naturopathic Doctor can help you interpret this test – many labs have normal ranges that include low iron levels that should be corrected with iron supplements.

If you are deficient in any of these nutrients a test of hydrochloric acid (stomach acid) should be considered to determine if you are not absorbing nutrients properly from your diet.

Hypothyroidism

Hair loss is one of the first features noticed by most women with hypothyroidism.  10 to 20% of the adult population has mild to severe hypothyroidism.  A blood test can be done to determine if hypothyroidism is causing your female hair loss.

Celiac Disease and Gluten Intolerance

Gluten Free LogoCeliac disease is a medical condition where gluten (a protein found in wheat, barley, and rye grains) damages the small intestines and causes systemic symptoms by cross-reacting antibodies that attack various cells in the body, including hair follicles.  The hair loss with celiac disease is often complete – a condition known as alopecia areata.

In people with gluten intolerance, the condition may manifest as hair loss (not complete) rather than digestive symptoms (which are a predominant feature of celiac disease).

Consider being tested for celiac disease if you have any of the following symptoms:

  • Bulk, pale, frothy, foul-smelling bowel movements
  • Weight loss
  • Signs of multiple vitamin and mineral deficiencies

A gluten-free diet will virtually eliminate symptoms in people with celiac disease.  A trial elimination of all gluten containing foods is recommended for anyone with hair loss to determine if gluten sensitivity is a cause.

Treatment of Hair Loss in Women

One of the central philosophies of Naturopathic Medicine is to treat the cause.  The treatment for female hair loss depends on the underlying cause of the hair loss.

hormone balance_feet
Hormone balance, addressing nutrient deficiencies and addressing the cause will improve hair loss in women.

Treatment of Androgen-Related Hair Loss in Women

  • Address underlying causes of androgen excess
  • Improve blood glucose regulation – low glycemic index diet, blood glucose normalizing supplements (such as glucomannan, fenugreek, or bitter melon), and regular exercise
  • Increase antioxidant intake – vitamin C, vitamin E, selenium, green tea
  • Saw palmetto extract – reduces the formation of dihydrotestosterone (DHT) a more potent form of testosterone that is often elevated in male and female pattern hair loss.  Works in a similar manner to Propecia (finasteride) – a prescription drug often used in female hair loss.

Treatment of Nutrient Deficiency-Related Hair Loss in Women

  • Test hydrochloric acid levels to ensure nutrients from food are being absorbed and supplement when necessary
  • A high-potency multivitamin and mineral formula (with iron when indicated)
  • Flaxseed or fish oil daily as a source of essential omega-3 fatty acids

Hair loss in women is a concern that should be taken seriously.  Although some hair loss naturally occurs with aging there may be another underlying cause of hair loss.  Consult with your Naturopathic Doctor if hair loss is a concern for you.  There is help available.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.