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The PMS Diet

Premenstrual syndrome may hit you like a storm each month, throwing your mood and your body into chaos and misery. But does it have to be like that? We all know women who sail through their cycles with not a concern in the world. Is it possible that we all can achieve that level of hormone harmony and banish our PMS symptoms? Yes, I believe it is.

The PMS Diet

My philosophy is that health comes from the balance of three key components:

  1. What we put into our bodies (food, alcohol, drugs, etc.)
  2. How we move our body (exercise, flexibility, play, etc.)
  3. The thoughts we hold in our mind-body (gratitude, self love, frustration, etc.)

With this philosophy at the core of my approach, I often suggest that women with hormone imbalances consider the impact of their diet. And in PMS your diet can have a huge impact – for good, or for bad. So lets get to it and discuss how you can have an impact on your PMS by optimizing your diet.

  1. Quit sugar

Ladies, you know this one. But it is so damn hard to do – your body can send some pretty strong cravings for sugar when hormone imbalances associated with PMS cause your serotonin to plummet. But sugar is not going to make anything better.

Women who experience PMS eat, on average, 275% more refined sugar than women who do not have PMS. What?!! That’s a ton of sugar! And women with PMS also consume between 200-500 more calories per day – typically in the forms of carbohydrates, fats and sweets. That is not going to make anyone feel better!

The main issue is that sugar increases the loss of magnesium in the urine – and magnesium deficiency is thought to be the cause of a lot of PMS symptoms, including fatigue, irritability, brain fog, insomnia as well as period cramps. Just to add to your misery, sugar also increases salt and water retention, leading to swelling and breast tenderness. Ugh.

  1. Avoid alcohol

We’re still in common sense country here, but avoiding alcohol really is something you need to do if you want to balance your hormones and eliminate PMS. While reaching for a glass of wine (or two) is tempting when you’re in a PMS rage, you are not making things any better. Alcohol can inhibit your liver’s ability to detoxify hormones, and can lead to higher circulating estrogen levels. This can exacerbate the imbalance of hormones that is already thought to cause PMS – high estrogen to low progesterone.  So consider making a cup of tea instead, and skip the alcohol for your own sake.

  1. Cut the caffeine

I’m really not making any friends with this article. I’m feeling like a bit of a buzz kill! But let’s talk straight – hormone imbalances are strongly associated with our behaviours. And we can change our behaviours!

Drinking coffee, and other caffeine-containing beverages, has been found to be associated with PMS, and with a greater severity of PMS. If you have PMS, I encourage you to try a cycle without caffeine and see if you notice an improvement, a lot of the women in my practice have found this to have a huge impact.

  1. Skip the salt

If you experience bloating, breast tenderness or swelling during PMS, you should check your diet to see if you are eating too much salt. Mostly found in processed food, salt can contribute to water retention, and swelling. Skipping prepared, processed and fast foods should bring your salt intake down to a balanced and healthy level.

  1. Get complex

Breads, bagels, crackers, pasta and other simple carbohydrates are setting you up for blood sugar instability and almost guaranteeing a miserable PMS. Instead of these foods, opt for the complex carbohydrates, these are slower to digest, keep you full longer and your blood sugar stable. Women who eat more complex carbohydrates also eat more fiber, an important nutrient that promotes estrogen elimination from the body.

So banish the bread and instead go for whole grains – brown rice, oats, quinoa, millet, and amaranth are delicious. And try sweet potatoes, squash, lentils, and beans for filling complex carbohydrates.

  1. Go green

Leafy greens are a PMS fighting superfood! A rich source of calcium and magnesium, leafy greens also support liver function, encouraging the liver to detoxify and eliminate excess estrogen. Choose your favourite leafy greens and eat them every day – kale, spinach, arugula, swiss chard or collard greens are all excellent choices!

  1. Go fish!

Fish, and other foods that are rich in vitamin B6, are important for any woman struggling with PMS. B6, a water-soluble nutrient, is involved in over 100 reactions in our body, many of which are involved in the production of hormones and neurotransmitters. Vitamin B6 is one of the best studied nutrients for PMS, and it has been found to help restore balance for women with PMS and reduce symptoms, especially mood symptoms such as irritation, anger and sadness.

  1. Open sesame

Sesame seeds are an excellent source of calcium, and clinical trials have found that women with the highest intake of calcium have the lowest incidence of PMS symptoms. While most studies have been on calcium supplements, increasing dietary calcium is a great place to start.

Other great sources of calcium include tofu, sardines, leafy greens, cabbage, broccoli, green beans, squash, bean sprouts, almonds, brazil nuts, quinoa, chickpeas, beans and oranges.

  1. Beans, beans, beans!

There are many reasons why beans pack a powerful punch in treating PMS. Beans are an excellent source of magnesium, one of the most important nutrient imbalances in PMS. Taken as a supplement, magnesium can improve mood, reduce breast tenderness and relieve pain during periods.

But beans offer more than just magnesium. They also are a rich source of fiber and protein. Women who consume a mostly vegetarian diet have lower incidence of PMS and lower levels of estrogen – both benefits that can be achieved by just increasing the beans in your diet.

  1. Boost Bacteria

Fermented foods, like kim chi, sauerkraut, kombucha and kefir all contain probiotics – healthy bacteria that can live in our digestive tracts and support our overall health. Healthy bacteria do more than just help our digestion, they also support hormone balance – especially estrogen elimination, an important component of managing PMS.

When your bacteria balance is optimal your body is able to easily eliminate estrogen. When your bacteria levels are out of balance estrogen levels increase and can significantly contribute to PMS. So try some fermented foods, or take a daily probiotic to balance your bacteria.

 Diet and More

Diet is an excellent place to start in treating your PMS.  It may seem simple, but simple things can sometimes be incredibly powerful.  Each action you take on a daily basis, each food you eat, or those foods you don’t eat, all influence your hormone balance and determine whether you sail through PMS or struggle.  Once you have started with these dietary changes, if you are still experiencing symptoms, check out my top treatments for PMS, ask whether you may be experiencing PMDD or take a refresher on the hormonal imbalances of PMS.  And if you are ready to take the next step, feel free to get in touch so we can work together on resolving your PMS.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

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150 Symptoms of PMS

With 3 out of 4 women experiencing some symptoms of premenstrual syndrome, most of us can come up with a pretty good list of symptoms for ourselves. But did you know that 150 symptoms have been identified? That’s a pretty substantial number!

Ranging from mild bloating to severe mood changes and migraines, and everything in between, PMS can seriously impact a woman’s mood, quality of life, and relationships.

And remember, you don’t just have to accept PMS. You can manage it and treat it effectively. But that’s in another article. This one is The 150 Symptoms of PMS.

Digestive Symptoms

  1. Bloating
  2. Weight gain
  3. Constipation
  4. Diarrhea
  5. Nausea
  6. Vomiting
  7. Gas
  8. Cravings for salt
  9. Cravings for sweets
  10. Cravings for alcohol
  11. Increased appetite
  12. Decreased appetite
  13. Increased sensitivity to alcohol
  14. Increased sensitivity to taste/ spices/ flavour
  15. Increased thirst

Physical Symptoms

  1. Fatigue
  2. Water retention and swelling
  3. Increased sweating
  4. Night sweats
  5. Hot flashes
  6. Fatigue
  7. Increased sleep hours/ desire for sleep
  8. Clumsiness
  9. Easy bruising
  10. Increased heart rate
  11. Irregular heart beat
  12. Increased sensitivity to light
  13. Increased sensitivity to sound
  14. Increased sensitivity to touch
  15. Increased sensitivity to chemicals
  16. Seizures

Ear, Nose, Throat and Head

  1. Tinnitus (ringing in the ears)
  2. Dizziness
  3. Lightheadedness
  4. Headaches
  5. Migraines
  6. Cold sore outbreaks
  7. Puffy eyes
  8. Blurred vision
  9. Hordeolum (eye stye)
  10. Dry mouth
  11. Rhinitis (runny nose)
  12. Worsening of allergy symptoms
  13. Increased sensitivity to odours

Respiratory System

  1. Shortness of breath
  2. Worsening of asthma
  3. Sore throat
  4. Sensation of lump in throat
  5. Hoarse voice

Muscles, Bones and Joints

  1. Back pain
  2. Leg pain
  3. Joint pain or worsening arthritis
  4. Muscle weakness
  5. Muscle stiffness

Lady Garden Symptoms

  1. More frequent urination
  2. More frequent yeast infections
  3. More frequent urinary tract infections
  4. More frequent HSV outbreaks
  5. Dry vaginal tract
  6. Painful intercourse

Breast Symptoms

  1. Breast tenderness
  2. Breast swelling
  3. Increase in breast size

Skin Symptoms

  1. Acne
  2. Dry skin
  3. Oily skin
  4. Oily scalp
  5. Increased sweating
  6. Swelling of face or extremities
  7. Worsening of rosacea
  8. Worsening of eczema
  9. Worsening of psoriasis

Mood and Emotional Symptoms

  1. Increased libido
  2. Decreased libido
  3. Poor decision making
  4. Eating disorders
  5. Anger
  6. Aggression
  7. Irritation
  8. Forgetfulness
  9. Indecisiveness
  10. Poor concentration
  11. Brain fog
  12. Inability to think clearly
  13. Poor learning, less able to retain information
  14. Lack of motivation
  15. Increased sensitivity
  16. Avoidance of social interaction
  17. Avoidance of responsibilities
  18. Withdrawn
  19. Confusion
  20. Excitability
  21. Mood swings
  22. Restlessness
  23. Hopelessness
  24. Anxiety
  25. Depression
  26. Loneliness
  27. Guilt
  28. Apathy
  29. Poor self esteem
  30. Reduced confidence
  31. Jealousy
  32. Paranoia
  33. Fearfulness
  34. Tension
  35. Poor coping
  36. Inability to relax
  37. Feeling keyed up or on edge
  38. Sadness
  39. Suicidal thoughts
  40. Frequent outbursts
  41. Sudden outbursts
  42. Feeling overwhelmed
  43. Feeling out of control
  44. Difficulty controlling anger or sadness
  45. Crying
  46. Melancholy
  47. Defensiveness
  48. Stubbornness
  49. Negative outlook
  50. More easily offended
  51. More easily hurt or upset
  52. Lack of coordination
  53. Intentional self harm
  54. Increased addictive behaviours (shopping, drugs, alcohol)
  55. Increased productivity
  56. Decreased productivity
  57. Hypersomnia
  58. Insomnia
  59. Lack of pleasure in life
  60. Worsening of pre-existing mental health concerns
  61. Possible increase in criminal behaviour

Well, try as I might, I could only find 133 symptoms of PMS.  To be considered a PMS symptom, it must have the following characteristics:

  1. Restricted to the luteal phase (second half) of the menstrual cycle
  2. Resolve by the four day of the next cycle (fourth day of the period)
  3. Cause impairment or distress for the woman
  4. Occur in at least two cycles
  5. Not be an exacerbation of another condition

Can you think of any PMS symptoms I may have missed? Were you surprised by any of the symptoms on here? Let me know in the comments below!

 

PMS or PMDD?

Premenstrual syndrome (PMS) is a many-headed beast – with over 150 different symptoms attributed to PMS, many women find the week before their period to be a challenging time.

But what about those women who are completely destroyed by their PMS? Who suffer with severe mood changes, insomnia and fatigue? For those women, they may be suffering from PMDD – premenstrual dysphoric disorder.

A Diagnosis of PMDD

PMDD is classified as a depressive disorder. It is not the same as clinical depression as it occurs with a very specific timing – during the second half of the menstrual cycle, after ovulation, and it resolves within a few days of starting your period.

PMDD causes a lot of distress and significantly impacts a woman’s ability to function and to maintain her quality of life. Between 2-6% of women experience PMDD, but many of them don’t seek treatment and instead suffer each month with severe symptoms.

PMDD is different from PMS in the severity of symptoms and the consequences of the mood changes.   The diagnosis is made by using symptom tracking reports and needs to meet the following criteria:

Treatment of PMDD

The conventional approach to treating PMDD results in most women being given one of two options: the birth control pill, or an antidepressant. While these treatments may be effective for some women, many more women are seeking a more natural, empowered approach to managing their PMDD.

Natural Approaches to PMDD

In my article on Ten Natural Treatments for PMS I discuss the lifestyle and diet for managing PMS. I suggest all women with PMDD also follow those recommendations. But for PMDD I tend to take a more aggressive approach – the symptoms are often severe enough to warrant a very targeted and bold plan.

Vitamin B6

Used in both PMS and PMDD, vitamin B6 is necessary for the production of cortisol, progesterone and serotonin – all hormones involved in PMS and PMDD. Taking high (orthomolecular) doses of vitamin B6 can be helpful at reducing symptoms of PMS and PMDD. Vitamin B6 is usually taken all month long, but higher doses can be used in the second half of the cycle if needed.

Calcium

Calcium has been found in studies to reduce a wide variety of symptoms associated with PMS. While I don’t find it to be useful on its own, in a robust protocol calcium can play a role in reducing both the mood and physical symptoms of PMS and PMDD.

L-tryptophan and 5-HTP

Two supplements that can increase the production of serotonin in the body, L-tryptophan and 5-HTP, show a lot of promise in the treatment of PMDD. Supporting the serotonin system in women has been one of the most effective means of treating PMDD. L-tryptophan and 5-HTP are the direct precursors of serotonin and can significantly reduce mood symptoms of PMDD. These supplements are not taken together, and should not be combined with other antidepressants. Use under the guidance of a knowledgeable and experienced Naturopathic Doctor.

St. John’s Wort

One of the most commonly used botanical medicines, St. John’s Wort is an excellent treatment for women with PMDD. Acting on the serotonin system in the body, St. John’s Wort can reduce depressive symptoms of PMDD and improve mood. It can be taken all month long, or just during the second half of the menstrual cycle.

Chaste Berry

Chaste berry (chaste tree, Vitex agnus-castus), which I also discussed in the PMS article, has been found to be effective for PMDD. Chaste berry can reduce anger, irritability, anxiety, mood swings, and physical symptoms associated with PMS and PMDD. My experience is that it can be moderately effective for PMDD, but often additional treatments are needed to help women feel considerably better.

IV Micronutrient Therapy

One treatment that I have found to drastically improve PMS and PMDD symptoms in women is IV micronutrient therapy (IVMT). IVMT allows us to administer doses of vitamins (like B6, calcium and magnesium) at higher doses than you would be able to take orally. IV therapy also provides an abundance of nutrients necessary for detoxification of hormones – and reducing the hormone burden in the body can greatly improve symptoms of PMDD. Not every woman is a candidate for IVMT, but talk to your Naturopath to find out if you are.

Bio-Identical Progesterone

While we don’t know exactly what causes PMS and PMDD, one suspect in this mystery is an imbalance of estrogen and progesterone – often called estrogen dominance. When progesterone levels are unstable, or low, and estrogen levels are high, PMS and PMDD depression and mood swings can result. For some women, especially those in their 40s, bio-identical progesterone can be a lifesaver. Your ND will give you a questionnaire to identify a possible progesterone imbalance, and may also recommend hormone testing.

Empowering Your Journey

If you are interested in learning more about how to manage your PMDD, I suggest working with a qualified Naturopathic Doctor who can guide you on this journey.  PMDD is too severe, and too complex to try and piece together a treatment on your own.  Working with an ND who can guide and support you on this journey may be the best decision you make for your health and your sanity.

Select Resources

Comprehensive Gynecology, Seventh Edition. Ed. Lobo R, Gershenson D, Lentz G. 2017; 37, 815-828.

Ferri’s Clinical Advisor. Premenstrual Dysphoric Disorder. Ed. Ferri FF. 2019

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

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Bitch Redux

In my work in women’s health I see a lot of conditions impacting the lady garden, endometriosis, PCOS, fibroids, cervical dysplasia, yeast infections and UTIs. But the one issue a lot of the women in my practice complain about is bitchiness. It might not be a medical diagnosis, but it impacts up to 80% of women at some point during their monthly cycle.

Women’s Emotions

Women have evolved to have immense sensitivity, and their emotional variations allow them to be more responsive to the environment, people and connections important to them.

Women are naturally more empathic and intuitive than men (of course acknowledging the great diversity of individual personalities). Women have always been the caretakers, the gatherers, the life-givers. Women rely more on social relationships for their survival, and the survival of their children and communities. Women have great emotional intelligence, because they need to be able to intuit and empathize with those around them – their children’s needs, their community’s goals, their partner’s intentions.

Women’s Brains

Women’s brains develop different to men, hardwiring us to feel more deeply, be more attuned to the emotional states of others, and be more reactive to the needs of those around us. At 8 weeks gestation, the testes become functional and the resulting surge of testosterone kills neurons in the communication centre of the brain. The testosterone instead develops more neurons for action, aggression and sexual drive – ultimately taking up about 2.5 times the space in men’s brains than women’s.

In women’s brains more space is allotted for language, hearing and memory. The memory center, the hippocampus, is larger in women, allowing those early female gatherers to remember where to find the food. The insula, thought to be the seat of self awareness, empathy, and interpersonal relationships, is also noticeably larger in women. This may lead to an increased intuition, or gut feeling, in women.

Women’s Hormones

Women’s hormones DO make them more moody. For women being fixed and rigid doesn’t lend itself to survival. Our emotionality is our strength – we may not be as physically strong as men, we rely more on our emotional connections and strength of connections, community and family.

Unlike men, whose hormone production spikes at puberty and remains fairly stable across their lifetime, women’s hormones ebb and flow over a monthly cycle and wax and wane over their reproductive years.

At the beginning of our menstrual cycle, at the onset of our bleeding, estrogen levels climb to prepare an egg for ovulation at midcycle. Estrogen production is strongly linked to serotonin production – and as estrogen goes up, so too does serotonin.

As estrogen continues to climb to the midcycle peak, most women note a positive mood state. During this time our biology encourages us to be more social, to connect to our tribe, more confident, to meet people and more alluring, to try to find a mate to conceive a baby with.

Estrogen acts as a stress hormone, or an anti-stress hormone. Making us more likely to brush off things that at other points in our cycle may provoke a significant response.

At midcycle estrogen levels are at their highest, along with dopamine and oxytocin. This encourages pro-social, trusting behaviour, and we are more generous and connected to others in our social network. We also talk more and are more interested in intimacy than at any other time of the monthly cycle.

Immediately after ovulation, our estrogen levels start to decline, but the rise in progesterone catches us before our moods crash. Progesterone doesn’t increase serotonin levels like estrogen does, but it supports GABA production, leading to a sense of calm and low anxiety that persists for about 10 days while progesterone levels are high.

All hell breaks loose during the final 3-7 days of the menstrual cycle however, with estrogen levels at a low, and progesterone levels steeply declining. Women during this time are more depressive, more cautious – a way for nature to keep us from harm during a time when we may be pregnant without knowing it.

The low estrogen also makes us less resilient, experience more physical pain, more emotionally sensitivity, and makes us more likely to react or respond to triggers that we would ignore during our high estrogen first half of the cycle. It’s not that we have more stress – we’re just way more likely to call it what it is and not stand for any shit.

Estrogen is essentially the “whatever you want honey” hormone – you are so much more willing to give to others and sacrifice your own needs when estrogen levels are high. But when those levels drop we are more likely to react and share our opinions – good or bad. It is not that we are reacting to things that aren’t really there – we’re reacting to things that upset or anger us – we just might ignore them at other times. If you feel underappreciated, overworked, or overwhelmed, or that you’re not in balance with your partner – it’s probably all true.

Bitch Redux

I want to encourage women to recognize the power in our hormonal fluctuations – our mood changes are adaptive – they help us seek out relationships, build connections, and preserve our energy. The mood changes that occur during our premenstrual phase are normal, and temporary. I want women to reclaim our natural hormone and mood fluctations, and be empowered by our emotions, rather than struggling against them.

My recommendation is to learn your natural fluctations and use your bitchiness as a superpower. Track your cycle – using any number of excellent free apps – and plan your month accordingly. Plan for presentations, meetings, anything requiring verbal skills for your first half of the cycle (the closer to ovulation the better! Your personality is magnetic when you’re near ovulation!) Have a task that requires fine motor skills – an intricate art project or rewiring your house? Keep that to the first half of the month as well.

Leave the tasks best left for your OCD-self for the last month of the cycle. I think most women probably read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up during the last week of their cycle. So put “clean out the kitchen cupboards” on your list for the premenstrual week (maybe stay out of your closet though – many women feel less appealing during their premenstrual week and this could be a disastrous task.) Your pain tolerance is also lowest during your premenstrual phase – so skip the dentist or your tattoo appointment and get a mani-pedi or skin care facial instead.

Think of your PMS as a time to spend in reflection and personal contemplation. Your intuition is at its peak in the week before your period, so take time to do a mental health inventory – are you doing what you want? Are you where you want to be? Pay attention to the things you are critical about during your premenstrual phase – these thoughts are probably a lot more valid than you might want them to be. Write down the things that upset you/ anger you/ send you into a whirling passion of emotions and act on them in the beginning of the next cycle when you’re feeling energized and empowered again. Harness your bitchiness, it could end up being your greatest power.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

Hormone Harmony in PMS

Welcome to the first installment of the “Hormone Harmony” series. In this series I’ll be exploring some of the most common states of female hormone imbalance, how your hormones can explain your symptoms, and some simple hormone hacks to help bring your body back into a state of hormone harmony.

Premenstrual Syndrome (PMS)

While a definition of PMS may not be necessary if you are reading this (it’s likely you’ve had first hand experience), I will try to give one that encompasses exactly what PMS is.

PMS is a recurrent set of physical and/or behavioural symptoms that occurs 7-14 days before a period and negatively impacts some aspect of a woman’s life

There have been over 150 (seriously!) symptoms of PMS identified. Some of the most common include:

  • Low energy
  • Mood changes – anger, crying, irritability, anxiety, depression, bitchiness
  • Food cravings
  • Headache
  • Low sex drive
  • Breast tenderness
  • Digestive upset – constipation, bloating, diarrhea, gas
  • Difficulty sleeping

Unfortunately we don’t really know what causes some women to experience PMS more than other women. But hormone imbalances are a common proposed cause, and in my practice I see balancing hormones as the most important means of decreasing symptoms of PMS.

Hormone Imbalances in PMS

The relationship between estrogen and progesterone is one of the most important hormone balances in a woman’s body. Imbalance in estrogen and progesterone levels is thought to be the primary cause of PMS.

Estrogen is produced throughout the month by the ovaries, adrenal glands and fat cells. It main action is growth – growth of breast tissue in puberty, and growth of the endometrial lining in the uterus during menstrual cycles.

Progesterone is produced during the second half of the menstrual cycle – after ovulation – by the ovaries.  Progesterone helps to balance the effects of estrogen and prepare the uterus for a possible pregnancy.

A too high estrogen level, or a too low progesterone level is thought to be the most likely cause of PMS symptoms in most women. This state, commonly called “estrogen dominance” is the most common hormone imbalance in women between the ages of 15 and 50. Estrogen dominance is becoming more common in North America due to increasing exposure to xenoestrogens (chemicals in our environment that mimic estrogen), high rates of obesity, decreased ability of our livers to detoxify and overwhelming amounts of stress.

The important thing to remember with PMS and hormone balance is that it is the relationship and balance of estrogen and progesterone that leads to symptoms. You may have normal levels of estrogen, but if your progesterone is low you will still experience symptoms. Progesterone levels are low in women who do not ovulate, and in those with significant stress (your body will convert progesterone into cortisol, leaving you deficient in much-needed progesterone).

Hormone Hacks for PMS

If you are a woman experiencing PMS, taking charge of your hormones and getting them into balance can make a huge difference in your quality of life. Below are some simple Hormone Hacks to get you started.

  1. Follow the PMS diet

There have been some significant findings in the diets of women who suffer from significant PMS. Compared to women who do not have PMS they eat 275% more sugar, 79% more dairy and 62% more refined carbohydrates. Avoiding these foods – and instead choosing fruits, vegetables, whole grains and healthy proteins – can diminish PMS symptoms significantly and promote healthy hormone balance.

  1. Cut the caffeine

No one wants to hear it, but drinking caffeine-containing beverages increases the severity of PMS. And those effects are worsened if you add sugar to your tea or coffee. So cut back, or cut it out all together if you want to decrease your PMS.

  1. Exercise

Women who exercise regularly have less PMS. Multiple studies have found this to be true, and the more frequently you exercise the better the boost. Exercise is known to decrease estrogen levels – so get out there and get moving.

  1. Get your nutrients in

Deficiencies in many nutrients have been found in women with PMS. Some notable ones include magnesium, vitamin B6, and zinc. All of these nutrients can be found in nuts and seeds – also known to be excellent sources of vegan protein.

  1. Get tested

Understanding your hormone imbalances can be incredibly valuable to managing symptoms like PMS. Testing your hormone levels will give you a clear understanding of what is happening in your body during a specific phase of your menstrual period. For PMS we test hormone levels (estrogen, progesterone and prolactin) about 7 days before your expected period.

  1. Herbal hormone balancers

There are some phenomenal hormone balancers in the world of herbal medicine. Vitex agnus-castus (also known as chaste berry) can improve progesterone levels, helping to balance estrogen dominance. Phytoestrogens, like those found in black cohosh, soy and flaxseeds, can also help to normalize estrogen levels by decreasing the action of our body’s own estrogen in favour of the milder estrogen signal from plant estrogens.

  1. Bioidentical progesterone

When all else fails in hormone balancing for PMS, your naturopathic doctor can prescribe low dose bioidentical progesterone in a cream that you can apply during the final weeks of your menstrual cycle. This will be helpful if your progesterone levels are low, or if your estrogen levels are high. Be sure your ND is qualified to prescribe bioidentical hormones, as additional training is required.

Don’t suffer with hormone imbalances like PMS.  You can achieve hormone harmony, and working with a Naturopathic Doctor can get you there.  Book an appointment, or a meet and greet now to find your personal balance.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only. It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider. Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.