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Food Sensitivity Testing

Food sensitivity testing is one of the tools Naturopathic Doctors use to assess health in our patients.  In Naturopathic Medicine our goal is to find the cause of symptoms of illness and disease.  In a previous article, Understanding Food Sensitivities, I discussed what food sensitivities are and the importance of testing. In this article we will look at the options for food sensitivity testing.

Testing for Food Sensitivities

There are several methods of testing for food sensitivities.

  1. Elimination Diet

wheat is a common food allergenMost people attempt a food elimination diet as an initial way of self-diagnosing food sensitivities.  A hypoallergenic, anti-inflammatory diet is consumed for a set period of time (usually 6-12 weeks).  All the most common allergenic foods are eliminated and the patient self-monitors for improvements in symptoms.  Foods are re-introduced one at a time after the initial period of restriction.  If symptoms arise on reintroducing the food then a food sensitivity is suspected.

Advantages: Promotes a general sense of well-being, high level of patient involvement in their health.

Disadvantages: Does not eliminate all potential sources of sensitizing foods.  Requires compliance with a restricted diet for a period of time.  Can be expensive (the cost of egg-free, gluten-free, dairy-free, organic food adds up quickly).

  1.    Electrodermal Food Allergy Testing

A machine is held by the patient and the electrical frequencies of food are tested against the body’s reaction to those foods (the brain interprets the electrical signal and elicits a skin resistance response which is read by the machine).

Advantages: Painless.  Children can be tested easily.   A clear outline of food sensitivities and the severity of sensitivities is given.  Foods do not have to have been consumed recently for valid results (although accuracy is increased if they have been consumed recently or are consumed frequently).

Disadvantages: Moderately expensive.  Some practitioners do not accept the validity of the testing method.  Test accuracy relies on technician proficiency.

  1. IgG Food Sensitivity Testing

A blood test is analyzed by a specialized laboratory to assess for IgG (immunoglobulin G – one of two antibodies produced during an sensitivity response). IgG antibodies are produced for several hours or days after exposure to an allergen (which is one of the reasons why some symptoms of food sensitivity don’t occur immediately after eating a food).

Advantages: Gives a clear outline of food sensitivities and the severity of the sensitivity.  Tests for a wide variety of commonly consumed foods (from 120 to 300 foods).  Only a small amount of blood is required for the test and it can be done in office or at home.  Antihistamine use is permitted during the test.

Disadvantages: Can be expensive.  Food must be consumed within 3 weeks prior to the test for an accurate reading.  Immunosuppressant drugs (prednisone, chloroquine and azothioprine) must not be used during the testing.

In my Toronto clinic I most commonly use the IgG food sensitivity blood test to assess for food sensitivities.  Clinically I have found this test to accurately identify sensitivities and result a corresponding improvement in patient symptoms. I support my patient’s ability to choose whatever testing they find to be ideal and can support that decision making process and help to develop a treatment plan, whatever the testing method selected.

Why is this testing different than that provided by my MD or allergist?

milk is a common food allergyMost severe, immediate allergy symptoms are a result of IgE (immunoglobulin E) – responsible for Type I hypersensitivity reactions in which a food antigen attaches to an IgE antibody and results in an immediate, and potentially life-threatening, hypersensitivity reaction.  Because of this many MDs have limited their testing to this class of immunoglobulins.

There is considerable evidence for IgE testing, but there is also abundant evidence that IgG(immunoglobulin G) is an important marker for food sensitivity testing.  IgG and IgG-complexes are involved in 80% of all food allergy or sensitivity reactions.  IgG is involved in delayed immune responses which are more common in food intolerance.

How can I learn more about food allergy testing?

At my Toronto clinics, I offer Rocky Mountain Analytical’s IgG Food Allergy test.  They offer more information here.  You can also book a complimentary 15 minute consult with me to discuss whether or not food sensitivity testing can help you achieve your goals for a vibrant, healthy life.

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.

 

Ten Tips to Treat Allergies

Spring has sprung!  And with it comes… allergies.  The sniffling, sneezing, burning and redness can put a damper on this beautiful time of year.  But there is hope.  Here are ten tips to try this allergy season.

1. An Apple a Day…

The oldest medical cliché in the book – but it’s true.  A study of 1500 people found that eating apples lowers the incidence of allergy and asthma symptoms.

2. Eat Citrus Fruits Daily

Eating citrus regularly can decrease the symptoms of allergies and asthma.  This is likely due to the vitamin C and bioflavonoids that are abundant in citrus fruit.  Eat at least one citrus fruit daily – organic lemons, limes, oranges, tangerines, clementines, kumquats and grapefruits are good choices.

3. Eat Lots of Berries

Berries truly are a ‘superfruit.’  They are rich in vitamin C, bioflavonoids, anthocyandins and antioxidants.  A high intake of antioxidants has been shown to have a positive impact on allergy symptoms.  Eat one handful of blueberries, blackberries or raspberries daily to get the benefit from these sweet superfoods.

4. Determine Food Allergies and Avoid Them

Food allergies and sensitivities can cause a lot more than just digestive symptoms.  Consider having a food allergy test to determine your individual food reactions.  Or try the elimination diet with your Naturopathic Doctor to see how food allergies and sensitivities are impacting your allergies.

5. Eliminate Margarine From Your Diet

Margarine is high in poly-unsaturated omega-6 fatty acids which can result in inflammation in the body (the symptoms of allergy – runny nose, itchy red eyes – are due to inflammation of mucous membranes).

Adults and children with allergies should remove all margarine from their diet.  A 2003 study found that eating margarine led to more symptoms of wheezing and runny nose (allergic rhinitis) in children with allergies.

6. Try the Anti-Inflammatory Diet

There are foods that we eat that can decrease inflammation and there are other foods that can promote inflammation in our bodies.  The Anti-Inflammatory diet can teach you how to boost anti-inflammatory foods (like flax seed oil, citrus fruits and various vegetables) and decrease pro-inflammatory foods (like margarine, dairy products and red meat).

7. Increase Essential Fatty Acids

Essential fatty acids are the heavy-hitters of the natural anti-inflammatory world.  Omega 3 fatty acids found in flaxseed and cold water fish are the most effective in the treatment of allergy symptoms.  Increasing omega 3 fatty acids in your diet (or through use of supplements) results in decreased production of inflammatory chemicals and fewer allergy symptoms.

8. Quercetin

Quercetin is a bioflavonoid that is found in a wide variety of foods (including apples, citrus fruits, onions and buckwheat).  It is nature’s anti-histamine, reducing the release of histamine from mast cells.  It should be taken preventatively – year-round for chronic allergies and seasonally for seasonal allergies.

9. Stinging Nettles (Urtica dioica)

This local medicinal plant has a long history of use in the treatment of allergies.  It has been rigorously studied and has been shown to be as effective, or more effective, than popular allergy medications.  It is available as a tea or in freeze-dried extracts.  It should be taken daily throughout allergy season.

10. Acupuncture

Acupuncture can be a useful addition to the management of chronic or seasonal allergies.  Between 6-10 sessions are needed to tonify the detoxification systems of the body and balance the organ systems (skin, liver, kidneys, and adrenals) that are commonly involved in allergy symptoms.

Book an appointment with your Naturopathic Doctor now to customize your comprehensive plan for the upcoming allergy season.  It may turn out to be your best season yet!

Disclaimer

The advice provided in this article is for informational purposes only.  It is meant to augment and not replace consultation with a licensed health care provider.  Consultation with a Naturopathic Doctor or other primary care provider is recommended for anyone suffering from a health problem.